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  1. #11
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    A psychiatrist diagnosed me with ADHD because I found the chair in the office particularly bouncy and bounced my butt on it a few times.

    No seriously. They were incredibly bouncy.

    And there were ads for ADHD medication all over the walls, on the clocks, on the stress balls, and on the pens.

    Those chairs were that bouncy on purpose. I am sure of this.
    And those chairs were installed by Big Pharma.

  2. #12
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    Seriously, it's all a conspiracy to make you pay for placebos.

    Where is a tin foil hat when you need one?
    That's the thing, though. They're not placebos.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  3. #13
    Shaman BlackCat's Avatar
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    Did you not see my response?

    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCat View Post
    Being forced to get help often results in rebelling against it.

    You should just treat everyone differently who is a psychologist or a counselor, you might actually get something out of it. Why expect EVERY counselor to be that way based on a few examples? Don't let the bad apple ruin the bunch. They are just doing their job, and if you just mess with them then it will be naturally inaccurate, since you are purposefully not being accurate with your representation of yourself and your answers to their questions.
    () 9w8-3w4-7w6 tritype.

    sCueI (primary Inquisition)

  4. #14
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    Many humans, by nature, tend to be apposed to authority.
    Children tend to accept authority. However the demographic of 'teenager' has been created for marketing purposes.

    And the 'teenager' has been marketed as the rebel without a cause.

    However in revolutionary societies like the US or France this inchoate teenage rebellion resonates with the bourgeois revolution that shaped both societies.

    So on the one hand in these societies teenagers grow up absurd. But on the other hand, they are carrying out the cultural imperative of the bourgeois revolution.

    And these two aspects of teenagers have set like reinforced concrete and are being exported to the world by the world's greatest propaganda machine, Hollywood.

  5. #15
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCat View Post
    Did you not see my response?
    Yes, sorry. My more logical mind tells me you are correct. However, whenever I sense superficiality, I want to dismantle it before it's own eyes.

    All I can do is comply the next time.

    To be honest, the main purpose of this thread was to see if someone else understood me. However, advice is interesting.

    That's my problem. I don't even want advice.

    @ Victor: I despise the American media, particularly television. I unraveled the mysteries of commercialism at a very young age.

  6. #16
    Shaman BlackCat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mystic Tater View Post
    Yes, sorry. My more logical mind tells me you are correct. However, whenever I sense superficiality, I want to dismantle it before it's own eyes.

    All I can do is comply the next time.

    To be honest, the main purpose of this thread was to see if someone else understood me. However, advice is interesting.

    That's my problem. I don't even want advice.
    Oh, my bad.

    As long as you know what you need to do, and as long as you try to change the situation for the better, then my work here is done.
    () 9w8-3w4-7w6 tritype.

    sCueI (primary Inquisition)

  7. #17
    Ginkgo
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackCat View Post
    Oh, my bad.

    As long as you know what you need to do, and as long as you try to change the situation for the better, then my work here is done.
    Indeed, thank you.

  8. #18
    Senior Member SciVo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    However the demographic of 'teenager' has been created for marketing purposes.
    I must take issue with this. While adolescents are over-studied by marketers, they are also under-studied by psychologists. I've heard that neuroscience has found that during adolescence, the brain is in a very different phase than before or after. The advent of sexuality produces an exploratory phase of wild neuron growth (as in babies) for discovering the rules of adult society, before eventually pruning unused paths (again). As a result of those infantile profuse neural tangles, teenagers actually have worse judgment than just before puberty. So, I believe that adolescence is a very distinct phase of life that deserves more professional attention, and not just from compliance professionals trying to sell something.
    INFP ~ Fi/Ne/Ni/Te ~ 9-2-4 sp/so

  9. #19
    Senior Member compulsiverambler's Avatar
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    I like the psychologists and psychiatrists I've seen. I just find they're the only ones worth confiding in most of the time, because they're not too emotionally entangled and seem, at least, to understand what I'm talking about and have useful things to say. They don't tell me I'm analysing things too much, or look baffled or incredulous. I've never felt manipulated though, in a covert way, and I imagine I wouldn't like that. I've never had one try to push my buttons.

    And God, I wish it were that easy to get diagnosed with ADHD in this country. There are just two free public clinics here with professionals qualified to diagnose it in adults, so if you're not wealthy or privately insured it often takes years from your initial GP's referral to get through the whole process. Not to mention the fact that most doctors haven't even heard of it lasting into adulthood and you've got an extremely high chance of being misdiagnosed with various mood and anxiety disorders first.

  10. #20
    Patron Saint Of Smileys Gloriana's Avatar
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    I've had a similar distrust of psychology professionals for most of my life. I was targeted at school for severe bullying starting at age 11, and after awhile I literally stopped going to school because no one would do anything to help the situation. I was forced to go to court, and then the laundry list of different psychologists/counselors began filling.

    First one I ever had was at age 12, and the guy had this metal washer suspended from the end of a thread. He held the thing by the string until it was still, then asked a yes or no question out loud. The thing started moving, either back and forth or side to side to represent the "yes" or the "no". He told me to hold it and ask things aloud, questions like "Should I go back to school?" and "Is my mother upset by this?", etc.

    He held my hand as I held the thing, under the guise of 'keeping it steady'. All of sudden the thing was telling me to go back to school, that my mother was upset, that it would be better for everyone if I missed no more days. He asked me if I was moving the little 'pendulum'. I looked him square in the eye and told him I wasn't, and he responded as if he was surprised like "Well I'm not either, how about that?".

    I was only 12 but right then and there I just thought "You complete quack". The guy was basically using what amounted to a Ouija board as his method of child psychology, and it implanted a very deep distrust and skepticism in me about that profession. I was only 12 but I was not a fool, and felt extremely violated by that experience since this man held a lot of my fate in his hands (in terms of whether or not he would recommend me for juvenile hall).

    I had a string of similar counselors in my younger years, and through my teens. These were state funded facilities most of the time, and while even then I knew they were most likely overworked and underpaid, it was often a bone of contention for me. After ten minutes of talking to me and reading some quick form I'd filled out, they would diagnose me as depressive with social anxiety, and it was like I ceased existing as a person.

    I could personally own that I had lots of issues, but what I hated was how hard they tried to cram me into the parameters of their handy diagnosis criteria even if I did not fit there. I often took to messing with them myself, marveling at how irritable they would get when I told the truth and how seemingly enthused they were when I would lie but place myself into the criteria they wanted me to be in.

    I did not give up on it entirely though. I did have the fortune to have one single therapist in my youth who actually listened and approached me as an individual with individual reasons for my depression and anxiety problems. I was only given 20 sessions with her by the state and was sad when it had to end. It stuck in my mind as proof there were decent psychologists out there.

    I would say the majority of psychologists I had definitely pushed for medications first thing, either setting me up with the prescribing psychiatrist in the facility or sending me to a GP with a note so I could get pills. I've been on so many different meds I could not name them all now. They simply did not work, all they did was make me into a zombie. I was told I was combative for my resistance to meds, and I tried entertaining the idea they were right, trying to be open minded. In the end though, the meds just made it all worse (for me personally).

    I did not see any significant change in my depression/anxiety until I was 23. I took it upon myself to start reading psychology books and reading every book I could my hands on about therapy techniques. I felt at home with cognitive therapy techniques immediately, and started applying them with my own schedules and lists. I worked my butt off, and after going through another handful of psychologists that could not help, I finally found one that I felt I could respect and trust.

    I changed into a completely different person within the span of about three years of work, and I have not looked back since. I certainly still struggle with things but I am not what I once was, I am no longer at the mercy of depression and anxiety. I didn't use one pill to get here either. It was partly my proactive investment in what I guess is called "Bibliotherapy" and partly by finding a psychologist that was up front, confrontational without being condescending, with an ability to work WITH me as a team.

    I can completely relate to being suspicious of certain mental health professionals, I think there are a lot of them out there who are too dogmatic with what they've been taught in universities and seminars to really help an individual (same goes for any sort of doctor to be fair).

    Still, I think going in with an open mind is key. I think it is true that if you decide the person across from you is going to be a quack and have the radar set only to recognize their failings, it will most likely be a self fulfilling prophecy. I think there are psychologists/counselors who are very good at what they do and do have the ability to help people, I think it's just the cliche' advice everyone gives about being patient in finding the right one.

    It is harder when you've been exposed to the quacks with the parlor tricks and the condescending "I'm here to dominate your mind" sort of approach though, for sure. Harder, but not impossible.
    "Nobody in life gets exactly what they thought they were going to get, but if you work really hard, and you're kind, amazing things will happen. I'm telling you...amazing things will happen" --Conan O'Brien

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