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  1. #11
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nebbykoo View Post
    All technical language is exclusive by nature, and that can be off-putting, and many people like that effect. It separates them (and their knowledge) from others.
    If you want to talk about to people who don't speak the language, then use analogies with common items or concepts to get the point across. Anti-jargon!
    Quite correct. This is a variant of the tragedy of the commons. A wishes to make the point, in writing, that he is technically proficient. He writes a discourse peppered with technical terms, some pertinant, some not. His colleague, B, sets about demonstrating his proficiency by writing a paper peppered with more technical terms, this time most of them only decipherable to those in the know. C sets about competing on similar lines, as does D - and so on.

    It only takes one smart arse to start this trend and any papers involving the humanities become gobbledegook.

    The tragedy is that knowledge becomes exclusive. Exclusivity is the greatest arrogance; hurdles are set primarily to affirm an existential position not promulgate ideas.

    This site has many tips for making your papers more accessable: Free guides

  2. #12
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BerberElla View Post
    No, I think with certain types of people, any kind of knowledge breeds arrogance because they are arrogant people to start off with. The superior knowledge is just one of the many ways they display that arrogance. If they didn't have it, they would be arrogant with other things.

    You can get people who are very knowledgable who don't feel arrogant nor condescending to people who don't know as much.
    Yes, but I'm not arrogant in general. I just find it hard not to feel arrogant when I have technical knowledge. I even avoid showing it, but it's definitely there in a big way that increases with the amount of technical knowledge.

    How do you know that they're just not displaying their arrogance?

    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    Quite correct. This is a variant of the tragedy of the commons. A wishes to make the point, in writing, that he is technically proficient. He writes a discourse peppered with technical terms, some pertinant, some not. His colleague, B, sets about demonstrating his proficiency by writing a paper peppered with more technical terms, this time most of them only decipherable to those in the know. C sets about competing on similar lines, as does D - and so on.

    It only takes one smart arse to start this trend and any papers involving the humanities become gobbledegook.

    The tragedy is that knowledge becomes exclusive. Exclusivity is the greatest arrogance; hurdles are set primarily to affirm an existential position not promulgate ideas.

    This site has many tips for making your papers more accessable: Free guides
    What's wrong with exclusivity? No offense, but of what use could such knowledge possibly be to crude, common people? They would simply tear it down and dismiss it as impractical and irrelevant to their lives, because they can't see beyond their own experiences and the immediate applications.

    It would only be detrimental to the development of such ideas if these people were allowed to access them and so easily form and share their uninformed opinions about things. They would drown out the good ideas with their mass support of simpler ones that seemed right to them. It helps filter the people who aren't serious about understanding the subject out of the discussion.

    People are always talking about the problems of exclusivity, but they never consider the problems the alternative approach would create.

  3. #13
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    Yes, but I'm not arrogant in general. I just find it hard not to feel arrogant when I have technical knowledge. I even avoid showing it, but it's definitely there in a big way that increases with the amount of technical knowledge.

    How do you know that they're just not displaying their arrogance?
    True, I don't know, I guess it's the feel I get off of them. People who are arrogant seem to have this vibe pouring out of every word they say, the way they stand, the look in their eyes when they are looking at people, it's just in your face.

    IRL it's easier to tell, online is the only time I think I would mistake that feeling, but rarely since even their posts are steeped in arrogance.

    I wouldn't say that about you, you seem to be tempered with a better ability to try and understand everyones POV, something alot of INFJ's are really good at. Very very smart people, lots of knowledge, but minus the arrogance that can often go with that. (I know you are saying you feel that way on the technical aspect of things, but it's not leaking out of your words in the way it does with them)
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

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  4. #14
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
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    Perhaps your usual lack of certainty leads you to over correct when you are capable of being confident?
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  5. #15
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    Once you have studied something long enough, even if the material seemed difficult at first it will eventually seem elementary or even common sense. It is easy to forget that other people have not had this training, and then you lose patience with them.
    My wife and I made a game to teach kids about nutrition. Please try our game and vote for us to win. (Voting period: July 14 - August 14)
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  6. #16
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    I think lack of technical knowledge in respective areas where the knowledge should exist, are more susceptable to arrogant behaviour. The need to try and seem 'well knowing' by being blunt and arrogant to cover for knowledge shortcomings.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  7. #17
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Liquid_Laser View Post
    Once you have studied something long enough, even if the material seemed difficult at first it will eventually seem elementary or even common sense. It is easy to forget that other people have not had this training, and then you lose patience with them.
    Yeah! I think that has something to do with it. I generally take a while to lose patience, but when someone continually misunderstands how to select their address bar and type something into it, well... that can be frustrating.

  8. #18
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Athenian200 View Post
    Yeah! I think that has something to do with it. I generally take a while to lose patience, but when someone continually misunderstands how to select their address bar and type something into it, well... that can be frustrating.
    Welcome to the NT side of life.
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  9. #19
    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xander View Post
    Welcome to the NT side of life.
    I think everyone relates to NTs a little when they encounter someone who constantly struggles to figure out something incredibly simple. Almost everyone I know has at least ONE story about having to work with an incompetent person stumbling around and doing everything wrong, making their lives miserable.

    NTs are just naturally good at so many things that most other people aren't, that it's magnified in them.

  10. #20
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Hmm, in my experience people that don't know what they talk about are usually the loudest. Funny. Completely opposite experience from just about everyone else here. xD
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

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