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  1. #21
    triple nerd score poppy's Avatar
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    Wow, interesting. I hadn't heard the term "HSP" before, although I have known people who probably are. I also didn't know that there was a wikipedia article defining "Man Cave".


    Quote Originally Posted by run View Post
    But don't non-HSPs need that stimulation?
    Hm, I'm not sure what you mean by that. I don't think less sensitive people require loud tv/music/activities, but some people like it. I am not one of them.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Not to annoy anybody with stupid questions,

    But if HSP means High sensative person, how do you know if you are one? Is it being highly sensative to exterior stimuli? I'm thinking that's excactly what it is given the context.

    Is it the case, too, when you can't read when the radio or television is on? I can't..I need near silence.

    So, if somebody could clarify that? That would be great.

    As for the thread itself, I think you have a few options.

    Silently Honest put it pretty good when he said being assertive would be the best approach. They will become aware that it is effecting you, and you might have to ask them more than once, but I think it's the best method.

    If you choose not to confront them, you can try noise-canceling head phones? That's a pretty specific answer, but if you are serious about it, Bose makes awesome head phones that do a pretty good job at cancelling out exterior noise. How they do it, I don't know.

    But if you want to take my appraoch..then turn up your television or stereo really really loud. When they come barging in, you can tell them straight up. But I wouldn't reccoment it. I'd do it in good fun, and know it's not a mature method of problem solcing
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  3. #23
    Wild Card Atomic Fiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    But if you want to take my approach..then turn up your television or stereo really really loud. When they come barging in, you can tell them straight up. But I wouldn't recommended it. I'd do it in good fun, and know it's not a mature method of problem solving
    This is the funny way of doing it, someone recommended this to me a while ago when I first had this problem too. I decided it wasn't worth the extra noise so I just did what I recommended earlier.

  4. #24
    Senior Member run's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Silently Honest put it pretty good when he said being assertive would be the best approach. They will become aware that it is effecting you, and you might have to ask them more than once, but I think it's the best method.
    That's the problem. I always feel that asking people twice would be rude. If they wanted to do it, they would have the first time you asked, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallulah View Post
    Sometimes, they need to leave the house and do something else so that the others can enjoy their entertainment the way they like it.
    Key word: sometimes.

  5. #25
    Wild Card Atomic Fiend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by run View Post
    That's the problem. I always feel that asking people twice would be rude. If they wanted to do it, they would have the first time you asked, right?
    Okay, so you feel buying headphones might be the best approach?

  6. #26
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by run View Post
    That's the problem. I always feel that asking people twice would be rude. If they wanted to do it, they would have the first time you asked, right?



    Key word: sometimes.
    I understand what you mean. What I might say as an F to you, as a T, might be a little bit of a roles-reverse, but they need to develop some respect if they don't listen to you the first time. If they didn't listen to you the first time, they could have ignored you, not taken you serious, or forgotten. In my opinion, I think it would be right for you to remind them even a few more times. For your sake, and theirs. If they didn't listen to you, they need a bit of leverage. They might listen. And your problem, and theirs, could be fixed.

    If that makes sense.

    You have more control over this than you think. They shouldn't victimize you. You shouldn't feel like a victim, because you have control. It's simple and right that you should confromt them. But I understand how it isn't as easy as one might put it out to be.
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  7. #27
    heart on fire
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    Silently Honest put it pretty good when he said being assertive would be the best approach. They will become aware that it is effecting you, and you might have to ask them more than once, but I think it's the best method.
    It is an urban myth that asking a TV addict will enourage them to take the feelings/needs of the non-TV addict into account.

    TV addicts will defend to the death their right to blast the TV into the wee dark hours of the night. They will either become very aggressive or incredibly defensive.

    It is a constant battle over the TV volume with a TV addict in my experience. Some of them, such my mother during my childhood, cannot be reasoned with at all. My father spent 20 years sleeping in a room with the TV blaring at top volume deep into the night. I wore earplugs in my room because the noise kept me up. I still don't understand how he lived with that.

    The TV in our culture has this image of being like an authority figure sitting in the corner. Of course one cannot be expected to turn it off, of course one cannot be asked to wear headphones with it. After all that's like asking your parent or dictator to shut up! One must be able to hear and obey the dictates of the TV from all corners of the room.

  8. #28
    Senior Member run's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    It is an urban myth that asking a TV addict will enourage them to take the feelings/needs of the non-TV addict into account.

    TV addicts will defend to the death their right to blast the TV into the wee dark hours of the night.
    he's not a tv addict though.

    I'd say the consensus is that they can get stimulation other ways besides the tv. If the tv was watched for a total of, say, 3 hours total and Kid #1 watched tv in his room a little more, that ain't bad. Not that I would ask that, but I think our rights/needs can meet, and I think its ok to ask them to chill at this point.

    Next problem though: Whether or not they listen is subjective, especially since I'm not around all day to know if they're on it or not. I only see what I see. So when I have to ask them again, which I will, I'll say "hey you're still on the tv a lot." - "No I'm not" ...and then what?

  9. #29
    Senior Member Nonsensical's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heart View Post
    It is an urban myth that asking a TV addict will enourage them to take the feelings/needs of the non-TV addict into account.

    TV addicts will defend to the death their right to blast the TV into the wee dark hours of the night. They will either become very aggressive or incredibly defensive.

    It is a constant battle over the TV volume with a TV addict in my experience. Some of them, such my mother during my childhood, cannot be reasoned with at all. My father spent 20 years sleeping in a room with the TV blaring at top volume deep into the night. I wore earplugs in my room because the noise kept me up. I still don't understand how he lived with that.

    The TV in our culture has this image of being like an authority figure sitting in the corner. Of course one cannot be expected to turn it off, of course one cannot be asked to wear headphones with it. After all that's like asking your parent or dictator to shut up! One must be able to hear and obey the dictates of the TV from all corners of the room.

    That's being a bit Judgmental, Heart. We can't assume that he is a tv addict, we can't assume he will act this way, and we can't even assume that so-called tv addicts do this in general. Maybe some?
    Is it that by its indefiniteness it shadows forth the heartless voids and immensities of the universe, and thus stabs us from behind with the thought of annihilation, when beholding the white depths of the milky way?

  10. #30
    Senior Member run's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OneWithSoul View Post
    I understand what you mean. What I might say as an F to you, as a T, might be a little bit of a roles-reverse, but they need to develop some respect if they don't listen to you the first time. If they didn't listen to you the first time, they could have ignored you, not taken you serious, or forgotten. In my opinion, I think it would be right for you to remind them even a few more times. For your sake, and theirs. If they didn't listen to you, they need a bit of leverage. They might listen. And your problem, and theirs, could be fixed.

    If that makes sense.

    You have more control over this than you think. They shouldn't victimize you. You shouldn't feel like a victim, because you have control. It's simple and right that you should confromt them. But I understand how it isn't as easy as one might put it out to be.
    very very interesting.

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