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  1. #21
    S Saiyan God Mace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kai View Post
    I spend time thinking about how things will contribute to my life rather than just getting on with things. Now I have to ask: Is there actually any real benefit to figuring out why we do stuff?
    It's to do with Prejudice.

  2. #22
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    Well, if we didn't question why we do stuff, INTP's would go insane.

  3. #23
    Iron Maiden fidelia's Avatar
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    Questioning why you do things is important for several reasons.

    EJCC had some good points, and they are especially interesting coming from an ESTJ. As you read about ESTJs, many people (unfairly) characterize them as out of touch with their emotions, not introspective, or overbearing. She is a great example of someone who has looked at some of those issues and used them as as an opportunity to educate others and also to balance out those tendancies where she finds them.

    We don't have enough lifetimes for the amount of mistakes we could make. If we can watch and understand our own positive and negative tendancies, as well as what is working/not working for others, we can save ourselves a lot of pain and a lot of irretrievable regrets and unfixable errors.

    Some feel it is their own business and if they make a mistake, it's their own problem. The flaw in that reasoning is that every decision we make has an impact on other people in some way. Who we marry isn't just our own business: we forever alter our immediate and extended family dynamics, we bring children into the world who are affected by what kind of parents ourself and the other person makes individually and in combination, we affect the education system, the medical sytem, the justice system and the climate of the country by what kind of kids we produce, we affect what kind of work gets done in the world by us as a couple, and we affect those in our circle whose lives we could improve/deteriorate by teaming up with another person. That is just one small example.

    The bigger a decision, the more it will affect others than only us, which is why it is up to us to properly research, analyze our own tendancies, consult others who have experience or regrets or wisdom etc.

    We also become much more comfortable with ourselves as we grow able to predict why we act and feel as we do. When we are more personally comfortable, we are then able to focus on the needs and interests of the people around us. Our own discomfort is really a form of self-centredness, even though we rarely would think of it in those terms. Therefore, when we become more confident and secure, we also become more selfless. At the same time, we also are better able to take care of ourselves properly (emotional needs, carving out appropriate time for self, treating our bodies well etc). This too is going to have a better effect on the larger society.

    Our insights to why we act as we do also give us clues for understanding why other people act in the way they do and give us more empathy and kindness than we could otherwise feel for them. As we become aware of how others have overlooked our shortcomings or contributed to the good things that we have, it helps us to extend grace towards others when they need it and to think of how we can provide for their needs too.

    No man is an island. Each of us individually contributes to the well-being or the downward slide of our culture or society. However, even if it were for selfish reasons, figuring ourselves out usually contributes to better relationships, a greater acceptance of who you are while shoring up your negative traits, more teachability, better character, a more rewarding work life, and often more money.

  4. #24
    Senior Member NewEra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kai View Post
    It's the summer holiday for this university student, which means that I've got lots of free time.

    Yay!!!! Or wait....

    I'm starting to think, that maybe the 'mass' of people that do stuff without thinking too much about the reason behind their actions, actually have a decent way of living. Perhaps this group that make broad sweeping generalisations against, secretly realise that there isn't much point questioning.

    I spend time thinking about how things will contribute to my life rather than just getting on with things. Now I have to ask: Is there actually any real benefit to figuring out why we do stuff?
    I think you're just thinking too much.

  5. #25
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kai View Post
    It's the summer holiday for this university student, which means that I've got lots of free time.

    Yay!!!! Or wait....

    I'm starting to think, that maybe the 'mass' of people that do stuff without thinking too much about the reason behind their actions, actually have a decent way of living. Perhaps this group that make broad sweeping generalisations against, secretly realise that there isn't much point questioning.

    I spend time thinking about how things will contribute to my life rather than just getting on with things. Now I have to ask: Is there actually any real benefit to figuring out why we do stuff?
    Yes, there is a point:

    "The unexamined life is not worth living." ~ Socrates

  6. #26
    Senior Member MonkeyGrass's Avatar
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    Of course there's a point! I may not be able to change myself or anyone else with the knowledge I acquire, but I can learn to get around something so I can explore new territory and build on that knowledge. Changing how we look at things changes how we respond to them. Different response = different results.

    I could keep using the same key on a lock over and over, or (almost as maddening) fumble around with a giant ring of keys, trying them systematically. Or, I could learn how locks work, what makes them tick, and PICK the damn thing and get to the other side of the door. ;OP

    Besides, what would be the fun of taking everything and everyone at face value? You can do really nifty things with new knowledge.
    I think I think more than you think I think.

  7. #27
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kai View Post
    It's the summer holiday for this university student, which means that I've got lots of free time.

    Yay!!!! Or wait....

    I'm starting to think, that maybe the 'mass' of people that do stuff without thinking too much about the reason behind their actions, actually have a decent way of living. Perhaps this group that make broad sweeping generalisations against, secretly realise that there isn't much point questioning.

    I spend time thinking about how things will contribute to my life rather than just getting on with things. Now I have to ask: Is there actually any real benefit to figuring out why we do stuff?
    Yes, but whether or not you care about that benefit will depend on your personal value system.

    Ns do have a nasty habit of labeling SJs silly sheep who follow the crowd just because they're mindless zombies, and that's very inaccurate. In actuality SJs just think the established method works better than experimental ones because we have concrete memories of it working. Fair enough.

    Your critique here is standard SJ: "If it doesn't apply to any measurable, tangible goals in real life, who cares?"

    And you have to understand that this viewpoint is based on a fundamentally different value system about what should be sought from life. While you may value consistency, practicality, predictability and stability, other types have completely different core values and goals for their lives which may seem strange to you.

    But from my value system, for instance, understanding the principles behind why we do things is a goal unto itself. It doesn't matter if it achieves any tangible goals in the real world; simply gaining new understanding is enough for me.
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  8. #28
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post

    But from my value system, for instance, understanding the principles behind why we do things is a goal unto itself. It doesn't matter if it achieves any tangible goals in the real world; simply gaining new understanding is enough for me.

    What is this-- a change of heart on your part?
    A desire to go from a superficial snorkeler to a scuba diver who plumbs the depths of the human psyche?
    There may be hope for you yet, son.

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