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  1. #1
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    Default Interpersonal Perception

    Interpersonal perception examines the beliefs that interacting people have about each other. This area differs from social cognition and person perception by being interpersonal rather than intrapersonal, and thus requiring the interaction of at least two actual people.

    Person Perception - The mental processes we use to form judgments and draw conclusions about the characteristics and motives of other people.

    Social cognition - how people process social information, especially its encoding, storage, retrieval, and application to social situations.

    Going for a job interview it is said that it takes about the first 5 seconds to determine a persons acceptance or not. Whether they are neatly dressed or scruffy, prepared or not etc, confident body language or not etc. that usually the first person will be remember most as the standard for the rest of the interview and the last person will be remembered most while the middle people will be all kinds of fuzz.

    Finding David Kenny's ideas helpful.

    Accuracy - the correctness of A's beliefs about B
    Self-other agreement - whether A's beliefs about B matches B's beliefs about himself
    Similarity - whether A's and B's beliefs match
    projection/assumed similarity - whether A's beliefs about B match A's beliefs about herself
    Reciprocity - the similarity of A's and B's beliefs about each other
    Meta-accuracy - whether A knows how others see her
    Assumed projection - whether A thinks others see her as she sees them

    In the every day first impressions are more about body language than actual speak sense and tone. say 70-75% of communication is non verbal so what creates the impressions, to perceive or judge situations according to how you feel, think, sense or intuit another person and the vibe you get. Would this be different for P's and J's, say. J's like value statements, P's like discernible statements?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    Interpersonal perception examines the beliefs that interacting people have about each other. This area differs from social cognition and person perception by being interpersonal rather than intrapersonal, and thus requiring the interaction of at least two actual people.

    Person Perception - The mental processes we use to form judgments and draw conclusions about the characteristics and motives of other people.

    Social cognition - how people process social information, especially its encoding, storage, retrieval, and application to social situations.

    Going for a job interview it is said that it takes about the first 5 seconds to determine a persons acceptance or not. Whether they are neatly dressed or scruffy, prepared or not etc, confident body language or not etc. that usually the first person will be remember most as the standard for the rest of the interview and the last person will be remembered most while the middle people will be all kinds of fuzz.

    Finding David Kenny's ideas helpful.

    Accuracy - the correctness of A's beliefs about B
    Self-other agreement - whether A's beliefs about B matches B's beliefs about himself
    Similarity - whether A's and B's beliefs match
    projection/assumed similarity - whether A's beliefs about B match A's beliefs about herself
    Reciprocity - the similarity of A's and B's beliefs about each other
    Meta-accuracy - whether A knows how others see her
    Assumed projection - whether A thinks others see her as she sees them

    In the every day first impressions are more about body language than actual speak sense and tone. say 70-75% of communication is non verbal so what creates the impressions, to perceive or judge situations according to how you feel, think, sense or intuit another person and the vibe you get. Would this be different for P's and J's, say. J's like value statements, P's like discernible statements?
    everyday situations? your the one doing the listening in the conversation? perceiving.

    i think J would like absolute statements...for a job? ready, plan, set, go

    P would be more flaky...might come across as indecisive and not assertive at all

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    Quote Originally Posted by thisGuy View Post
    everyday situations? your the one doing the listening in the conversation? perceiving.

    i think J would like absolute statements...for a job? ready, plan, set, go

    P would be more flaky...might come across as indecisive and not assertive at all
    Just with the J/P thing, I think a J interviewer can mistake P-flex as flakiness or indecision, while a P interviewer can mistake J confidence/closure as domineering or inflexibility.

    In general interactions with people, I found that projecting an air of easy-going confidence -- regardless of how I really feel -- and smiling and looking friendly sets the entire tone of the conversation. Not doing it can deep-six you, depending on what you want from the situation. People warm up to friendly (though non-invasive) people, and those who do not warm up would have shut you out anyway.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Just with the J/P thing, I think a J interviewer can mistake P-flex as flakiness or indecision, while a P interviewer can mistake J confidence/closure as domineering or inflexibility.

    In general interactions with people, I found that projecting an air of easy-going confidence -- regardless of how I really feel -- and smiling and looking friendly sets the entire tone of the conversation. Not doing it can deep-six you, depending on what you want from the situation. People warm up to friendly (though non-invasive) people, and those who do not warm up would have shut you out anyway.
    Yeah your spot on with that. When people interact with each other, they are sending verbal or nonverbal messages. And in that way the expression from body language and verbal communication is an indication of what positive and negative energy is created.

    Positive affirmation is the image that associates as the floating sphere for another time. When the reference turns heated, the positive nature of previous encounters is accessed and the negative nature is canceled. Where as with negative associations takes ten times the energy to return to a positive frame, it is then a trust issue. Seeing the non confidence, the tardiness based on appearance and reference to what is a healthy indicator of being.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thisGuy View Post
    everyday situations? your the one doing the listening in the conversation? perceiving.

    i think J would like absolute statements...for a job? ready, plan, set, go

    P would be more flaky...might come across as indecisive and not assertive at all
    Good call then that would depend on confidence more. Know what needs to be done and do it, a J could lose it at the last minute while P could have it all together, casual vs controls, what pressures existed before and after I guess.

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    Like the shopping cart experience. The entrance tends to stay on the left because people tend to browse on the right, the hot spots tend to stay in the front because people tend to notice the bargains sooner, the brands stay in the middle because its eye level, the music and direction of the path is pleasant and coordinated to make you feel at ease. What is familiar then tends to be the response that is right.

    Body language and verbal communication is taken in as an interpersonal relation sort of, like attachment styles in cognitive perspective.

    a) the proportion of significant relationships in which thoughts and feelings corresponded to the different attachment styles.
    b) the ease with which exemplar relationships are generated.
    c) interpersonal expectations.

    most people process relational knowledge corresponding to all three attachment styles and the relative availability and accessibility of this knowledge determines which style people report to characterize their thinking about relationships.

    Attachment theory provides a framework for understanding emotional reactions and also love, loneliness, and grief in adults.

    Secure adults find it relatively easy to get close to others and are comfortable depending on others and having others depend on them. Secure adults don't often worry about being abandoned or about someone getting too close to them.

    Avoidant adults are somewhat uncomfortable being close to others; they find it difficult to trust others completely, difficult to allow themselves to depend on others. Avoidant adults are nervous when anyone gets too close, and often, love partners want them to be more intimate than they feel comfortable being.

    Anxious / ambivalent adults find that others are reluctant to get as close as they would like. Anxious / ambivalent adults often worry that their partner doesn't really love them or won't want to stay with them. Anxious / ambivalent adults want to merge completely with another person, and this desire sometimes scares people away.

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    I meant to talk about interpersonal perception but attachment is interelated as taken from this site.

    Great Ideas in Personality--Interpersonal Theory

    Interpersonal theory comprises three strands of leading ideas: the principle of complementarity, the principle of vector length, and the principle of circumplex structure.

    The first strand: the principle of complementarity which contends that people in dyadic interactions negotiate the definition of their relationship through verbal and nonverbal cues. This negotiation occurs along the following lines: dominant-friendliness invites submissive-friendliness, and vice versa, whereas dominant-hostility invites submissive-hostility, and vice versa.

    The second strand is the principle of vector length, which contends that within diagnoses of personality type on the interpersonal circle, vector length is an index of psychopathology. In general, people with rigid, inflexible personalities have more problems even if such people are inflexible in a friendly direction whereas people with flexible, adaptive personalities have fewer problems even if such people are generally more hostile than friendly.

    The third strand is the principle of circumplex structure, which contends that variables that measure interpersonal relations are arranged around a circle in two-dimensional space. A circumplex can be viewed as merely a useful pictorial representation of a particular domain, can be viewed as implying circular order, can be viewed as implying exact circumplex structure.

    I thought it was interesting shush

  8. #8

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    An ENFP should make a theory on this, if any of us can be bothered .
    Freude, schöner Götterfunken Tochter aus Elysium, Wir betreten feuertrunken, Himmlische, dein Heiligtum! Deine Zauber binden wieder Was die Mode streng geteilt; Alle Menschen werden Brüder, Wo dein sanfter Flügel weilt.

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    Well yeah interpersonal theory is used with big five personality too.

    Interpersonal theory is rooted in the assumption that everything people do in interaction with one another reflects an effort to achieve and maintain self-esteem and to avoid anxiety. People's characteristic ways of accomplishing these ends are called security operations or interpersonal reflexes. A person's personality, according to interpersonal theory, comprises the set of all the person's interpersonal reflexes.

    Taking the circumplex model to other areas.



    The Constructive styles include (11) Achievement, (12) Self-Actualizing, (1) Humanistic-Encouraging, and (2) Affiliative. These styles characterize self-enhancing thinking and behavior that contribute to ones level of satisfaction, ability to develop productive relationships and work effectively with people, and proficiency at accomplishing tasks.
    11 Achievement: Based on the need to attain high-quality results on challenging projects, the belief that outcomes are linked to ones effort rather than chance, and the tendency to personally set challenging yet realistic goals. People high in this style think ahead and plan, explore alternatives before acting, and learn from their mistakes.

    12 Self-Actualizing: Based on needs for personal growth, self-fulfillment, and the realization of ones potential. People with this style demonstrate a strong desire to learn and experience things, display creative yet realistic thinking, and have a balanced concern for people and tasks.

    1 Humanistic-Encouraging: Reflects an interest in the growth and development of people, a high positive regard for them, and sensitivity to their needs. People high in this style devote energy to coaching and counseling others, are thoughtful and considerate, and provide people with support and encouragement.

    2 Affiliative: Reflects an interest in developing and sustaining pleasant relationships. People high in this style share their thoughts and feelings, are friendly and cooperative, and make others feel a part of things.
    The Passive/Defensive styles are (3) Approval, (4) Conventional, (5) Dependent, and (6) Avoidance. These styles represent self-protecting thinking and behavior that promote the fulfillment of security needs through interactions with people. However, in doing so, they interfere with personal effectiveness and negatively impact individual health and well-being.
    3 Approval: Reflects a need to be accepted and a tendency to tie ones self-worth to being liked by others. People high in this style try very hard to please others, make good impressions, and be agreeable and obedient.

    4 Conventional: Reflects a preoccupation with conforming and blending in with the environment to avoid calling attention to ones self. People high in this style tend to rely on established routines and procedures, prefer to maintain the status quo, and want a secure and predictable work environment.

    5 Dependent: Reflects a need for self-protection coupled with the belief that one has little direct or personal control over important events. People high in this style allow others to make decisions for them, depend on others for help, and willingly obey orderspossibly as a result of recent changes in their personal or work lives.

    6 Avoidance: Reflects apprehension, a strong need for self-protection, and a propensity to withdraw from threatening situations. People high in this style play it safe and minimize risks, shy away from group activities and conversations, and react to situations in an indecisive and non-committal way.
    The Aggressive/Defensive styles include (7) Oppositional, (8) Power, (9) Competitive, and (10) Perfectionistic. These styles reflect self-promoting thinking and behavior used to maintain ones status/ position and fulfill security needs through task related activities. Though sometimes associated with short-term success, these styles lead to stress, create conflict, and result in inconsistent performance.
    7 Oppositional: Reflects a need for security that manifests itself in a questioning, critical, and even cynical manner. Though people high in this style ask tough questions that can lead to better ideas, they might also emphasize even minor flaws, use criticism to gain attention, and blame others for their own mistakes.

    8 Power: Reflects needs for prestige and influence, and the tendency to equate self-worth with controlling others. People with strong tendencies toward this style dictate (rather than guide) others actions, try to run everything themselves, and treat others in aggressive and forceful ways.

    9 Competitive: Based on a need to protect ones status by comparing ones self to others, outperforming them, and never appearing to lose. People high in this style seek recognition and praise from others, view even non-competitive situations as contests or challenges to prove themselves, and try to maintain a sense of superiority.

    10 Perfectionistic: Based on the need to attain flawless results, avoid failure, and the tendency to equate self-worth with the attainment of unreasonably high standards. People high in this style are preoccupied with details, place excessive demands on themselves and others, and tend to show impatience, frustration, and indifference toward others needs and feelings.

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