User Tag List

First 5678 Last

Results 61 to 70 of 79

Thread: Eccentricity

  1. #61
    Senior Member Heart&Brain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Posts
    218

    Default

    A few years ago I watched a documentary about a Scottish Psychiatrist who had specialised in researching eccentricity. Unfortunately I don't remember his name, nor his exact definition of eccentricity, but he considered it innate and an interesting human variation that could neither be grasped by concepts of normality or insanity. But I remember some of his findings:
    Eccentricity is rare: 1 out of 10.000. (Finding enough research subjects was a funny story in itself, since eccentrics will not be pre-collected neatly in psychiatric hospitals, prisons, schools or other institutions for researchers to come and study...)

    Anyway, he found his sample of eccentrics and these are some of the results I remember:
    Compared to the general population on average eccentrics have a slightly longer life-expectancy. They have less incidents of mental illness. They live in single households more often. During their lifetime they have a higher number of committed romantic relationsships but then with shorter duration. They get a smaller number of children than average. They tend to be much more energetic and driven. They experience themselves as happy with their life more often than the average population. Their average intelligence is above normal and they can be highly educated. They tend to experience less anger and conflicts and are less likely to be criminal offenders or resort to violence.

    They pursue with zest their own idiosyncratic goals and are not interested in getting societal acceptance, nor do they seek societal attention, outrage or engage in powerstruggles. Live and let live-outlook.

    Examples of eccentrics included a British professor of theoretical physics who had spend most of his life experimenting to make a perpetuum mobile! He would explain how he obviously knew that it was impossible according to the laws of physics, but that he couldn't see why this would prevent him from keep trying when he enjoyed his project so much!

    Another example was a rich American lady from the LA-area, Jenny something who lived in the middle of the 20th century. Ever since her youth she loved to sing opera and payed for expensive lessons with famous singers, made records with her singing and hired famous concert halls to give her own concerts. She lived for this, never got married, never took any part in the usual rich-bunch social mores.

    The only problem was she couldn't really sing by any normal standards! She got terrible reviews and was ridiculed, but she didn't really pay attention. Eventually she got a dedicated audience who simply loved the funny freedom of these absurd opera-concerts and the honest and genererous love and energy she radiated and shared.

    She is dead now, but on her tombstone she left something like this:
    Many people said that I couldn't sing. They may have been right.
    But nobody can say that I didn't sing.

    Isn't that beautiful? The subjective intensity of doing, enjoying and enthusiastic sharing is celebrated over the conformity of judgement, objective performance and social success.

    So, eccentricity as goodnatured egotist vitality?
    A nice human variation, me thinks!

  2. #62
    Senior Member LostInNerSpace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Posts
    1,027

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heart&Brain View Post
    A few years ago I watched a documentary about a Scottish Psychiatrist who had specialised in researching eccentricity. Unfortunately I don't remember his name, nor his exact definition of eccentricity, but he considered it innate and an interesting human variation that could neither be grasped by concepts of normality or insanity. But I remember some of his findings:
    Seems like he tested a nice bunch of eccentrics. One presumes he would have got different results by first jolting them with a proverbial cattle prod.

  3. #63
    lab rat extraordinaire CrystalViolet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    XNFP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    2,170

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heart&Brain View Post
    A few years ago I watched a documentary about a Scottish Psychiatrist who had specialised in researching eccentricity. Unfortunately I don't remember his name, nor his exact definition of eccentricity, but he considered it innate and an interesting human variation that could neither be grasped by concepts of normality or insanity. But I remember some of his findings:
    Eccentricity is rare: 1 out of 10.000. (Finding enough research subjects was a funny story in itself, since eccentrics will not be pre-collected neatly in psychiatric hospitals, prisons, schools or other institutions for researchers to come and study...)

    Anyway, he found his sample of eccentrics and these are some of the results I remember:
    Compared to the general population on average eccentrics have a slightly longer life-expectancy. They have less incidents of mental illness. They live in single households more often. During their lifetime they have a higher number of committed romantic relationsships but then with shorter duration. They get a smaller number of children than average. They tend to be much more energetic and driven. They experience themselves as happy with their life more often than the average population. Their average intelligence is above normal and they can be highly educated. They tend to experience less anger and conflicts and are less likely to be criminal offenders or resort to violence.

    They pursue with zest their own idiosyncratic goals and are not interested in getting societal acceptance, nor do they seek societal attention, outrage or engage in powerstruggles. Live and let live-outlook.

    Examples of eccentrics included a British professor of theoretical physics who had spend most of his life experimenting to make a perpetuum mobile! He would explain how he obviously knew that it was impossible according to the laws of physics, but that he couldn't see why this would prevent him from keep trying when he enjoyed his project so much!

    Another example was a rich American lady from the LA-area, Jenny something who lived in the middle of the 20th century. Ever since her youth she loved to sing opera and payed for expensive lessons with famous singers, made records with her singing and hired famous concert halls to give her own concerts. She lived for this, never got married, never took any part in the usual rich-bunch social mores.

    The only problem was she couldn't really sing by any normal standards! She got terrible reviews and was ridiculed, but she didn't really pay attention. Eventually she got a dedicated audience who simply loved the funny freedom of these absurd opera-concerts and the honest and genererous love and energy she radiated and shared.

    She is dead now, but on her tombstone she left something like this:
    Many people said that I couldn't sing. They may have been right.
    But nobody can say that I didn't sing.

    Isn't that beautiful? The subjective intensity of doing, enjoying and enthusiastic sharing is celebrated over the conformity of judgement, objective performance and social success.

    So, eccentricity as goodnatured egotist vitality?
    A nice human variation, me thinks!
    I found this oddly uplifting.

    Hmmmm....eccentric is a word I have bandied about to describe me, that and off beat, although I wouldn't consider myself a true eccentric. I have no desire to prove it to anyone. I've known one or two true eccentrics...one was an art teacher, and egotisical was the word I use for her, and a friend at uni-he was really adorable. His child like glee was infectious, and his oblivious ways...he was just very lovable.
    Currently submerged under an avalanche of books and paper work. I may come back up for air from time to time.
    Real life awaits and she is a demanding mistress.

    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  4. #64
    DoubleplusUngoodNonperson
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    MBTI
    Hype
    Posts
    2,078

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Edgar View Post
    Rich people are eccentric.

    Poor people are just weird.
    Somehow the word "weird" fails to capture the entirity(sp?) of people like Ted Kaczynski, but you already knew this when posting!

  5. #65
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4
    Socionics
    INFp
    Posts
    3,403

    Default

    Whats normalcy then?
    Whats mainstream?

    Whats a sheep and whats a black sheep.

    I wanna be a ninja turtle.

    Do I consider myself eccentric or just left of center eclectic, I'll go for erudite, hahaha I wish. Its like saying am I really INFP, truly doggedly FINP or was that PINF, I has an undercoat of TENJ so watch out. Normally I'd feel eccentric but I don't invent stuff.

    Like a straight linear path, the road most traveled tends to be the least satisfying.

    All I'm doing is creating branches that deviate towards a different experience all the while traveling along the same path though in a different direction. Which means I'm either way ahead of the ball game or severely behind the ball game or just messing around in the middle hoping to coast along life's corridors as a straggler or a wayfarer or both. Wait does that include all the fringe benefits, I'd go for that.

  6. #66
    Freshman Member simulatedworld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Enneagram
    7w6 sx/so
    Socionics
    ILE
    Posts
    5,554

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    And here at Lake Wobegon, all our children are above average.
    *got the Garrison Keillor reference*
    If you could be anything you want, I bet you'd be disappointed--am I right?

  7. #67
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    4,601

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    Whats normalcy then?
    It's a hideous looking and awkward sounding word that's been invented by someone I want to find and shoot, in order to replace the already existing word "normality".
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  8. #68
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    4,601

    Default

    My dad: guy with undiagnosed Asperger Syndrome born in the 1930's. Never wore jeans his entire life. Gave over his life to finding and restoring AJS motorcycles (before they became Matchless) and Rover 16's from the 1940's. Extremely gifted mechanic, but never did it for a living - joined the army to look after the horses, left, got married, had 5 kids and went to live in the middle of nowhere far from family and friends, and pursue self-sufficiency to ridiculous levels (eg making kids grind home grown wheat between stones to make flour, etc). Wife left him 17 years later, after he had still never had a job paying more than minimum wage, whilst performing rare feats of mechanics in the garage every night. Offered a job for a professional vintage car restoring company - declined. Single-handedly built an entire garage and extra three rooms for his house, living alone in a small village, again far from anywhere or anyone else that he knew. The rest of the village knew him as the guy that drove around in the 1947 Rover 16 or on the 1952 AJS motorcycle, or possibly on an electric bicycle, wearing full bright yellow So'wester and rain cape like an old fashioned fisherman, who always smiled and laughed and fixed anyone's lawnmowers no matter how fucked up they were and never charged a penny. The day he died at age 67, he had been working on his Rover 16 - he was taking a tea break before installing a new carburettor when he suffered a fatal heart attack and died with a spanner* in one hand and wearing a tweed suit. His funeral, at the Jehovah's Witness hall (as per his assumed request, as he left no will) was attended by 300+ people, and the picture on the OHP of him had the words "always smiling" underneath them. Even though he absolutely never made any effort to make friends and couldn't conform to society even if he'd wanted to. All he left to his kids were the vintage vehicles and a cat - his house had been rented and none of his kids had anywhere to store the vehicles, so they had to be sold before the landlord took possession.

    He was known as the local eccentric.

    *I think you Americans call that a wrench.
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  9. #69
    no clinkz 'til brooklyn Nocapszy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    MBTI
    ENTP
    Posts
    4,516

    Default

    That guy was awesome.

    Except the flower thing... what was that about?
    we fukin won boys

  10. #70
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simulatedworld View Post
    *got the Garrison Keillor reference*
    Apparently you and I are the only two who would admit that publically. LOL!

Similar Threads

  1. How do you feel about eccentricity?
    By Survive & Stay Free in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 01-19-2013, 11:38 PM
  2. Eccentricity and MBTI
    By MerkW in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 96
    Last Post: 10-19-2010, 04:21 AM
  3. How are you eccentric?
    By onemoretime in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 09-20-2010, 06:17 PM
  4. [MBTItm] SJ and NT and Eccentricity
    By entropie in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 05-04-2010, 03:08 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO