User Tag List

First 34567 Last

Results 41 to 50 of 81

  1. #41
    Senior Member MrME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LucrativeSid View Post
    But, is being driven crazy a bad thing? That's the question! My girlfriend drives me crazy sometimes, but I love her!
    When it's stress-related, yeah. I would put money down that if a fairly outgoing extravert were forced to live my day-to-day life, within three months they would be clawing away at the wallpaper.
    INFJ
    4w5

  2. #42
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    6,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrME View Post
    When it's stress-related, yeah. I would put money down that if a fairly outgoing extravert were forced to live my day-to-day life, within three months they would be clawing away at the wallpaper.
    Of course we would go crazy. No strong introvert in their right mind would ever happily adjust to my life either.
    I don't think to be forced into whole new life would be a way to change your preferences. (Heck, I'm a P trapped in a J life!! Its terrible!! )

    But like anything, small steps. Slowly changing your focus. Change doesn't happen by force or in a set period of time. It happens by very purposeful and controlled effort of the person trying to make a change. And if you force yourself into a sudden huge lifestyle change, you get tired and frustrated, and you're still who you are. But slow, purposeful mental adjustments are possible to do. Over time people can make big changes in their personality. (In my mind, anyway.)

  3. #43
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrME View Post
    When it's stress-related, yeah. I would put money down that if a fairly outgoing extravert were forced to live my day-to-day life, within three months they would be clawing away at the wallpaper.
    Being forced into something may build some resentment, no matter what the situation is. But even then, they can either spend their time being resentful and scratching at wallpaper like a dumbass, or they can come to peace with it and try to think of a way to benefit from the experience. You always have the power of choice. Your attitude is yours to control. And if an extrovert made the choice themselves to live as introvert for three months from the beginning, rather than being forced into it, they'd already be a lot more at peace with it and a lot more prepared for it. Living as an introvert has more benefits than one could measure.

    The outcome of the extrovert would depend on the choices they made about the situation. Anything else is merely an excuse.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  4. #44
    Senior Member MrME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LucrativeSid View Post
    Being forced into something may build some resentment, no matter what the situation is. But even then, they can either spend their time being resentful and scratching at wallpaper like a dumbass, or they can come to peace with it and try to think of a way to benefit from the experience.
    Okay, let's not latch on to my use of the word "forced," here. I would challenge any extravert to voluntarily live my day-to-day life for three months straight. I said this already, but it bears repeating: I spent years trying to turn myself into an extravert, and all I got out of it were years of misery, depression, and confusion. I would expect an extravert attempting to turn him or herself into a introvert would experience something similar because their nervous system is not hardwired for long periods of time alone.
    INFJ
    4w5

  5. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrME View Post
    Okay, let's not latch on to my use of the word "forced," here. I would challenge any extravert to voluntarily live my day-to-day life for three months straight. I said this already, but it bears repeating: I spent years trying to turn myself into an extravert, and all I got out of it were years of misery, depression, and confusion. I would expect an extravert attempting to turn him or herself into a introvert would experience something similar because their nervous system is not hardwired for long periods of time alone.
    I wasn't latching on to the word "forced". I knew that wasn't your point. That's why I addressed an unforced scenario as well, so you wouldn't think I misunderstood you. "And if an extrovert made the choice themselves to live as introvert for three months from the beginning, rather than being forced into it, they'd already be a lot more at peace with it and a lot more prepared for it. Living as an introvert has more benefits than one could measure."

    You're still talking about pure change, though, and I'm not. Sorry about that. I think a pure change would be a worthless goal, regardless of whether it is possible or not. (The expanded version of this opinion is a few posts back.) It's only worthwhile to learn how to take the benefits from the opposite side while still keeping what you've already got. If you have to lose all your own benefits to gain the others, how would that even make sense?

    I was just responding to the idea that an extrovert couldn't live an introverted lifestyle for three months without going crazy or suffering from numerous negative side-effects.

    Why do humans flourish? Because we can adapt. A human being that cannot adapt is a sad human, indeed.

    So, sorry about the confusion. I wasn't talking about fully changing from one thing to another.

    Billions of introverts have spent years in misery, depression, and confusion without even trying to become extroverts. When you stopped trying to become an extrovert, what was it like? How happy are you now?
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  6. #46
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    By the way, those were serious questions. Not leads into something else that I want to say.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

  7. #47
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    6w7 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEE
    Posts
    6,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MrME View Post
    Okay, let's not latch on to my use of the word "forced," here. I would challenge any extravert to voluntarily live my day-to-day life for three months straight. I said this already, but it bears repeating: I spent years trying to turn myself into an extravert, and all I got out of it were years of misery, depression, and confusion. I would expect an extravert attempting to turn him or herself into a introvert would experience something similar because their nervous system is not hardwired for long periods of time alone.
    yea, either way, it would be frustrating
    voluntary or not. you can make minor changes to anything.
    minor changes lead to big changes. If I stopped talking and went into my room for a while, i'd appear more introverted, but i'd still be an extravert.

    Now if I began to try to be happy with introversion, or re engergize by spending time alone, (once in a while, on purpose.) Then slowly I may start to become more introverted.

  8. #48
    Senior Member MrME's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    383

    Default

    No worries, Sid. My extraverted roommates have both said that they would go crazy if they tried to live like I do. For example, I had a two-week vacation a few months back and I spent the vast majority of it at home.

    I also recognize that I'm extremely introverted and reclusive. It's a trait that I share with my father and my grandfather.

    Quote Originally Posted by LucrativeSid View Post
    When you stopped trying to become an extrovert, what was it like? How happy are you now?
    These days I'm probably happier than I've been since I hit my teens.

    Long story short, I landed in the hospital after suffering a pretty severe breakdown. The doctors said that I wouldn't be allowed to leave unless I agreed to go on an anti-depressant, so I agreed to go on Paxil. Once on Paxil, my emotions pretty much dried up, and I found myself spending a lot of time alone. I guilted myself out about it for a while, too. Then I weened myself off Paxil and found that I truly liked being alone with all the benefits that it brings, (peace, quiet and the opportunity to concentrate on subjects that I find fun and interesting), despite the guilt that I felt for losing touch with some people in my life.
    INFJ
    4w5

  9. #49
    lurking.... Wyst's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    1,662

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LucrativeSid View Post
    LOL. Elitist! And you must be talking about if you chose to act like an extrovert, not be one, because if you were actually being one, you wouldn't self-destruct.
    Exactly!
    Since we'll self-destructo if we choose to truly act like one, I think that being an extrovert isn't a choice.

  10. #50
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    837

    Default

    Sometimes I'd take statements like the ones your roommates made as something similar to, "I'd go crazy if I couldn't eat chocolate." Sure, the person loves chocolate, but without it, they'd be fine. (Unless they convinced themselves otherwise.) They might even realize that they like bananas even more than chocolate, especially if they were optimistic about the upcoming change. With stuff like this, your own choice and belief can pretty much make the case.

    I'll make no claims as to whether what they (or anyone) says is the absolute truth or not. That's not the kind of line I like to draw in my sketch of the world.

    I always claim uncertainty over whether or not I'm an E or I. I know tons of people who would swear it either way. The majority of folks that know me from here think I'm an E. However, I've spent years living alone in an apartment, often going months and months without visiting anyone or going anywhere. I never felt an ounce of guilt about it, either. Instead of feeling ashamed about this kind of behavior, I'd just make fun of the people who's invitations I'd declined for their inability to even do it.

    Am I happy or sad when I'm alone for long periods of time? I can be either one. And the same goes for when I'm socializing - it only depends. I don't think my happiness and ability to flourish has much to do with my introversion and extroversion and how I feed those things. The other factors are more important. Catering to your introverted or extroverted needs is no panacea for happiness. It's only one small part.
    "When a resolute young fellow steps up the great bully, the world, and takes him boldly by the beard, he is often surprised to find that it comes off in his hand, and that it was only tied on to scare away the timid adventurers." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-16-2017, 10:02 AM
  2. Glasser and Choice Theory
    By rivercrow in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-13-2016, 06:42 AM
  3. Towers Of Hanoi as an extraversion/introversion test
    By Luke O in forum Online Personality Tests
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 10-04-2015, 11:01 PM
  4. Transitioning to self sufficiency as a career choice
    By Chthonic in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-05-2014, 09:23 PM
  5. I've Figured it Out: Distinguishing Someone as S or N
    By Usehername in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 136
    Last Post: 08-24-2008, 09:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO