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  1. #21
    Member PureWhispers's Avatar
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    The only person I know who was professionally diagnosed with it is an ENFP...
    MBTI: ENFJ | Enneagram: 4w5

  2. #22
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Diagnosed with it or not, the only point at which it becomes a disorder is when it impairs your ability to live a normal, productive life.

    I am the ADHD poster child. I am hyper, cheerful, creative, and can't sit still for the life of me.

    I was not diagnosed as a kid (despite the occurrence of the above + disciplinary problems), my parents denied the existence of mental health. My Dad's answer to all ailments was "hard work."

    When I was about 31, my second daughter was just born, I was working 2-3 jobs to keep my wifey at home. I just took a new position and although the work was not intellectually stifling, it was taking me forever to finish my tasks. I was falling asleep in meetings (unless I was presenting something, at which time I was happy as can be), and getting really frustrated at the amount of overtime I was putting in to get everything done.

    I asked a psychologist friend of mine if I could be tested for ADHD and he said to go to my primary care physician, which I did. My PCP gave me some SNRI medication first, whcih tore my stomach up and didn't help me focus worth a damn. Then he gave me a Rx for Ritalin. Within 20 minutes of ingesting the first tablet the world stood still before my eyes for the first time, it was such a relief!

    -A.

  3. #23
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    Its the N. It relates things. With Ne imagine walking around and seeing how things relate, your mind jumps from one thing to another, being Se we ignore how things relate and look for the differences. We naturally ignore 90% of the world, we hear a car crash and are just like oh thats a car crash. An Ni will relate it to something internally while an Ne will race through all the things that they have seen that relate to car crashes. N dominant/auxilary will relate everything, its like this relates to this, which relates to this, which relates to this, which.... Now try to keep a straight thought when you naturally percieve things based on how it relates.
    Im out, its been fun

  4. #24
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    Personally I think ADD/ADHD is a response to a poorly balanced endocrine system or mineral deficit. I became ADD the last few years with an adrenal gland and cortisol increase.

  5. #25
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    Well, I am pretty sure I have it although I was never officially diagnosed. I took some Ritalin for preparing for an exam and let me tell you, it helped a lot!!!!
    Also my performance at work was much better when on even a really small dosage of Ritalin... My job is really boring unfortunately...so the Ritalin makes it much easier to concentrate on the boring stuff...

    My son has been diagnosed with ADHD just not long ago, and the funny thing is he must be NT, and all the doctors wouldn't believe me for a really long time, saying things like he is not the "typical case" etc.. Cause he loves to read and is practically a genius, they thought that it must be impossible that he is ADHD... lol.

    When he got evaluated though, the psychologist said 100% ADHD... so go figure...
    Nothing is always xyz...

  6. #26
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    Personally I think ADD/ADHD is a response to a poorly balanced endocrine system or mineral deficit. I became ADD the last few years with an adrenal gland and cortisol increase.
    [Not Hating, Just Commenting]
    I would have to disagree here; your statement (bolded) is too global.

    As far as your issues with increased adrenaline/cortisol was that resolved via medication or lifestyle change? I know my wife's aunth, when she was terminally ill with brain cancer, was receiving major doses of Deca Dron, a corticosteroid. At that time she was hyper manic, it was really bizarre as she was usually really calm.

    So, I know cortisol can cause hyperactivity, but am having issue with believing all that are ADD or ADHD have a cortisol imbalance.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Synapse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    [Not Hating, Just Commenting]
    I would have to disagree here; your statement (bolded) is too global.

    As far as your issues with increased adrenaline/cortisol was that resolved via medication or lifestyle change? I know my wife's aunth, when she was terminally ill with brain cancer, was receiving major doses of Deca Dron, a corticosteroid. At that time she was hyper manic, it was really bizarre as she was usually really calm.

    So, I know cortisol can cause hyperactivity, but am having issue with believing all that are ADD or ADHD have a cortisol imbalance.
    Well I'm only going from my experience, my adrenal insufficiency is linked to my hypoglycemia which is a reaction to sugar and caused me to become ADD with an association with disrupted functioning of T4 and T3, thyroid hormone, in such an instance my focus progressively declined to the point I had an attention deficit and appeared catatonic. This shocks me because to go from reading 20+ books a year to struggling to focus enough to read or write anything without skipping was unheard of for me. Yet it was happening and still is to an extent. My brain dropped out at a crucial junction in my life when I needed to focus most.

    What most people are unaware of is how significant the role of proper adrenal and or thyroid conversion and function is and the associated reactions that happen.

    To get a better understanding this article makes for interesting reading.

    ADHD/Brain

    A specific sympathetic nerve channel between the vegetative centers and the adrenals directly stimulates the release of noradrenaline and adrenaline from cells of the adrenal marrow into the blood stream when under stress. This vital cell system, influenced by amphetamines and under stress from the hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline, together with the whole metabolism and hormone and immune systems, are compromised. The adrenergic cells of the adrenal marrow are stimulated simultaneously by cortisol that formed in the adrenal cortex. Cortisol is the final hormone from the stress cycle of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. This axis is also influenced by the amphetamine over activation, via the noradrenagic, dopamine and serotonin agitation of the limbic system. In this scenario the frontal pituitary excretes cortisol stimulating ACTH hormone into the blood stream, which stimulates cortisol synthesis in the adrenals. The elevated cortisol table has a stress reducing effect on the hypothalamus which acts like a control valve to prevent backflow (graphic 10). This negative backward coupling can be disturbed by permanent stress. It is the opinion of today's psychiatrists that nearly all depressive episodes are caused by stress, which blocks the cortisol. Since most of the anti -depression drugs, like amphetamine, elevate noradrenaline and serotonin in the brain synapses, the hyper kinetic syndrome and the attention deficit can be seen as stressors and the positive amphetamine effect in the beginning can be seen as a stress reducing factor. The relationship between the cortisol hormone and the adrenal receptors in the brain or between the inner organs in the periphery of the brain is, in any case, much more complicated. Since there are different adrenal receptors (alpha and beta receptors) and a constantly elevated cortisol level mainly sensitizes the beta receptors and increases their numbers, the signaling path of the beta receptors is more strongly activated within the cell.

    As with all amphetamines, there is a reduction in effectiveness over time, because the effective dosage has to overcome the threshold value for the activation of the adrenal alpha-receptors. The permanent stimulation of these receptors, caused by Ritalin, also activates a desensitizing effect, as a counter regulation of the receptors. The therapeutic dose has to be increased and the dependency potential develops which involves the noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin receptors as well as their coupled intracellular signal pathways and the synthesis of the cell energy. Besides that, the danger exists with higher Ritalin doses that the neurotransmitter reservoirs don't replenish fast enough because Ritalin forces a sudden drainage. The result can be unexpected psycho-social and organic slips .
    Ritalin is a Doping Medication Not a Healing Medication.

    Inevitably the question arises whether the cause of ADD is indeed a deficit of the noradrenalin or due to the different sensitivities of the noradrenergic sub-receptors when under normal noradrenalin release. The fact is that when an increase of noradrenalin, induced by Ritalin, takes place, enough noradrenalin is at hand and the noradrenalin receptors are quickly and lastingly agitated; this underlines the fact that with hyperactive children, the alpha receptors, under stress with normal noradrenalin output, are not sufficiently stimulated and the dopamine psycho-motor synapses are not sufficiently counter stimulated. The central stimulation of the noradrenergic alpha receptors seem to be, at first glance, the means for stimulating the wakefulness and attention controlling brain area during therapeutic practice. Long tern Ritalin therapy proves to interfere enormously with personality development and physical maturity during childhood and teen years, with highly risky long-term consequences.

    From the experience with simple tyrosine stimulation instead of long-term Ritalin stimulation, the alternative therapy principle for children and teens with ADD and ADHD can be derived from an orthomolecular therapy principle. In clinical studies, tyrosine applications have shown to produce stress-reducing effects.

    Tyrosine is also the starter molecule for the synthesis of the thyroid hormone (thyromine). Under stress conditions the free thyronine (T3), in relationship to the inactive reverse thyronine (rT3), respectively to the thyronine which is tied to a protein, is decreased. The T3 content is nonetheless essential for the synthesis of the universal energy carrying molecule adensintriphosphate (ATP) within the breathing cells of the mitochondria. The adrenergic stimulated neurons the ATP requirement is increased, since the ionic in and out flow, plus the secondary signal pathways, are energy dependent.

    T3-thyronine deficiency can also produce psycho-motor unrest and lack of concentration.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Synapse View Post
    Well I'm only going from my experience, my adrenal insufficiency is linked to my hypoglycemia which is a reaction to sugar and caused me to become ADD with an association with disrupted functioning of T4 and T3, thyroid hormone, in such an instance my focus progressively declined to the point I had an attention deficit and appeared catatonic. This shocks me because to go from reading 20+ books a year to struggling to focus enough to read or write anything without skipping was unheard of for me. Yet it was happening and still is to an extent. My brain dropped out at a crucial junction in my life when I needed to focus most.

    What most people are unaware of is how significant the role of proper adrenal and or thyroid conversion and function is and the associated reactions that happen.

    To get a better understanding this article makes for interesting reading.

    ADHD/Brain
    The thing is what caused this. Something changed for you to go from 20+ books to your state. While what you described caused the symptoms of Add, what caused your brain to malfunction? ADD can be linked to an imbalance, but what I dont think doctors understand is what caused the imbalance, they just try to fix the imbalance. We spend so much time trying to fix symptoms. The imbalance is a symptom itself because it was not there before.
    Im out, its been fun

  9. #29
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if I am ADD or just NP syndrome lol.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

  10. #30
    Senior Member Gauche's Avatar
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    Never been diagnosed ADD or something like that, and never had a serious problem caused by ADDness, but I do certainly have a slight form of ADD. Some traits just fit perfectly and some fit less

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