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View Poll Results: Absolutism?

Voters
24. You may not vote on this poll
  • E - yes

    3 12.50%
  • E - no

    6 25.00%
  • I - yes

    4 16.67%
  • I - no

    8 33.33%
  • S - yes

    1 4.17%
  • S - no

    0 0%
  • N - yes

    6 25.00%
  • N - no

    16 66.67%
  • T - yes

    2 8.33%
  • T - no

    8 33.33%
  • F - yes

    5 20.83%
  • F - no

    6 25.00%
  • J - yes

    0 0%
  • J - no

    3 12.50%
  • P - yes

    8 33.33%
  • P - no

    10 41.67%
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  1. #1
    Senor Membrane
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    Default Different Kinds of Absolutisms

    I'm talking about strict rules of any kind that forbid something in your life totally. Are you vegetarian, are you not having sex till you marry, not drinking, not eating certain meat... Anything that draws a definite unbreakable rule in your daily life.

    To make this clear, I am not really talking about rules that are given to you by religion or some other organization. I mean absolutism that YOU have decided for yourself.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Moiety's Avatar
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    ENFP and no.

  3. #3
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    No

  4. #4
    Senior Member placebo's Avatar
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    Never kill myself, that's it I think. Lol how morbid.

  5. #5
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    Maybe I should explain the reason I am asking this.

    I've met people with many kinds of absolute rules. Sometimes they define their whole life on a single rule, and this has puzzled me. Maybe because it is so black and white. Back in the day when I didn't basically drink at all, I had attitude against people who drank a lot. I thought they are wasting their lives and causing trouble to other people. After I started seeing more shades of gray, the rule lost it's meaning.

    I observed similar black n white attitudes among the other types of absolutists and this has led me to assumption that such rules are not healthy, or they might be the result of less healthy mind. If I am right, there should be no clear correlation between absolutism and MBTI functions.

    What do you think?

  6. #6
    Senior Member placebo's Avatar
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    It kind of depends what the person's reasons are for it I think.
    I mean, if it's a rule you have because you look down on it, sometimes I think those people shouldn't judge something they don't understand. I hate the self-righteous. But if you have maybe really personal reasons about it--like there's some kind of personal pain associated with whatever you have a rule against--then that's more understandable.

  7. #7
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    I'm pretty sure everyone has an absolute in their life: they won't have sex with an immediate family member, kill children, torture animals, steal food from the starving, set the elderly on fire, I could go on and on...

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGuffin View Post
    I'm pretty sure everyone has an absolute in their life: they won't have sex with an immediate family member, kill children, torture animals, steal food from the starving, set the elderly on fire, I could go on and on...
    Those are rules set by society (and pretty surely very universal morals). They are not really related to this. Come on, you know what I'm talking about.

    Quote Originally Posted by placebo View Post
    But if you have maybe really personal reasons about it--like there's some kind of personal pain associated with whatever you have a rule against--then that's more understandable.
    Well, if someone doesn't drink because he knows he will beat his wife and kids, then it is basically common sense and not directly related to my question. (But, in fact, if he beats them he is not healthy, so it could be indirectly related)

  9. #9
    Senior Member placebo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nolla View Post
    Those are rules set by society (and pretty surely very universal morals). They are not really related to this. Come on, you know what I'm talking about.



    Well, if someone doesn't drink because he knows he will beat his wife and kids, then it is basically common sense and not directly related to my question. (But, in fact, if he beats them he is not healthy, so it could be indirectly related)
    Oh yea, I was also thinking a little more indirectly, such as knowing someone who died of alcoholism or having an abusive alcoholic parent or something (so it's a bit of a psychological thing). Also, for reasons such as personal health might be understandable--such as being vegan, or not smoking.

    But I guess, like what I said, it's sort of limiting to create such a strict rule. Though, I'm sure some people do grow out of it like you. I almost get the sense that it's like the person is concentrating all their fears or insecurities about life on that one rule, and if they can keep that rule, they are doing 'good' in their lives.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by placebo View Post
    I almost get the sense that it's like the person is concentrating all their fears or insecurities about life on that one rule, and if they can keep that rule, they are doing 'good' in their lives.
    Yes! This is very close to how I see it. It is like, I have seen that "this thing" is bad. And I will not have another opinion about it. Then it all comes down to avoiding "the bad" but while doing so, I allow myself to be blind to the other "bads".

    Quote Originally Posted by placebo View Post
    Oh yea, I was also thinking a little more indirectly, such as knowing someone who died of alcoholism or having an abusive alcoholic parent or something (so it's a bit of a psychological thing). Also, for reasons such as personal health might be understandable--such as being vegan, or not smoking.
    Ah, yeah, health as a motive is really hard to categorize here. It is partly a creation of society, partly fashion and partly of real heath advice. I still don't know if being a vegan is good or bad for health. All I know is that people have eaten meat basically forever, and this is why I don't feel no reason to go vegan. On the other hand, I smoke. And I know it isn't good. So, it is very difficult to include health in this "theory".

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