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  1. #51
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    It's strange... whilst on the one hand I feel like I was practically born bored and that it's my natural state, on the other hand I know I've always got something to do and can always find things to do, never have difficulty occupying myself. And yet, whatever I'm doing most of the time, I'm still bored. About the only time I'm not even slightly bored, when the awareness of boredom is utterly banished (temporarily), is when I'm having a really fun, lively, intelligent and exploratory conversation with someone.
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
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    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  2. #52
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    I'm only bored when I'm upset.

    When I'm not, the things I do seem worth doing...
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemonday View Post
    I recently read an interesting essay by Adam Phillips, "On Being Bored".
    It made me wonder how boredom might relate to type. Do you think boredom is a symptom of poverty of imagination? Of inactivity? Or frustration with reality?
    Are you bored often? Are you more bored by having a lot of (boring) stuff to do, or not enough? How does it manifest itself? And how do you overcome it - do you use distraction techniques? Or do you focus on deeper issues?

    Does boredom serve a purpose, like depression - can it make us question the pattern and progress of our lives to-date?
    Does it make us shake ourselves out of a rut? What other purpose might it serve?
    Nobody pointed this out yet, but I really think the characteristic with the strongest relationship to boredom is extroversion. Extroverts NEED external stimulation or the result is boredom. Most of the people here that report little to no boredom are introverts. I myself only get bored when I'm in a situation where I feel obligated to pay attention to the environment when something boring is going on. It manifests itself more like anxiousness or being antsy because I know as soon as I get out of that situation, I'll be okay. Generally, most strong introverts have so much going on in their heads that it's hard for them to get bored, and they generally have lifestyles that don't rely much on the environment for stimulation.

    S/N relates to the Big Five trait of Openness. High openness types (N) have a low tolerance for repetition and the familiar and look for novelty. Familiar things can become boring to them. Low openness types (S) have a low tolerance for novelty, and when exposed to too much, they feel a strong need for being around the familiar.

    J/P relates to Conscientiousness (C). People high in C (J's) are more disciplined and capable of continuing with work even if it is boring. Low C types (P's) are generally less professional, less formal, and more interested in fun.

    *late add on*

    I just thought of this. High openness types have a broad range of interests and the low openness types have a narrow range. So if you have 10 fields of interest instead of let's say 2, it's a lot easier to find something that will keep you from getting bored.

  4. #54
    Senior Member Wade Wilson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluemonday View Post
    Yes. I've been in that negative feedback loop. It's dangerous and can get horrific pretty quick.
    How do you get out of it, or do you just have to wait for it to pass?
    Well, unfortunately it's piling a negative on top of a negative for me. To alleviate my boredom I engage in any various form of escapism which is only temporarily relieving me of the problem which, of course, returns once I get back to reality.

    My main issue is that without engaging in reckless behavior I don't really know how to find any consistent outlets for alleviating boredom. Ten years ago the answer would have been to quit my job, take all my money out of the bank and take a roadtrip to some random place. I got over that after about the fifth time of having to move back home broke & unemployed though.
    I know a girl, she's one of a kind
    But the poor little thing, she's going out of her mind
    There's something you forgot - there's a reason why she's lost
    Cos baby she don't want to be found

  5. #55
    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiL View Post
    Lately I've been feeling like life is a grand struggle against boredom. For me, I'd say I get bored due to frustration with reality. As a kid, I was hyper and always had ideas and plans to entertain myself with, but as I've gotten older, I've realized that most of these ideas and plans will never come to fruition. I'm fighting this sense of futility that leads to boredom with everything. I thrive on the feeling that what I'm doing is part of some larger future goal, and when those goals feel uncertain, I get discouraged and bored pretty easily. That really sounds like a sort of depression, but I'm rarely sad, just lost.

    I can say that the boredom I've been experiencing lately is absolutely connected to questioning the pattern and progress of my life to date. I feel right now that I'm searching for some realistic larger goal or path to latch on to, and until I do, I find it hard to commit to things, which leads to boredom. To fight it I try to stay busy - do things that get me out of my comfort zone and make me consider new ideas or possibilities. I hope that if I find something new in this period of uncertaintly - if I try to widen my perspective - I'll be inspired again. It can be laborious though.

    Edit: I also try to keep a sense of humor about everything, to make it more bearable.
    Sounds like existential ennui to me.
    I don't know what the answer is...it's the curse of our generation.
    How to find meaning in a world that makes no sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by wedekit View Post
    I am rarely ever bored. I can always find something productive to do. Though I say "Dr. So-and-so's class is boring", I think that I really mean "dull". I am always irritated by people who lie around moaning "I'm borrreeeddddd". Get a hobby. It works, I promise. Not all pleasures and entertainment in life come from immediate gratification.
    That's quite judgmental of you. A hobby is just a distraction. I think it is perhaps braver to be bored and to explore the reasons why, then to desperately try to fill your life up with useless time-killing 'stuff'. Only an unthinking person would equate having no time with being fulfilled.

    Quote Originally Posted by Antisocial one View Post
    This is exactly about what I was talking about.
    What a smart J will do is planning, so that he/she ends up in a situation where doing things = doing things you want to do. Everything else is just a obstacle that serves as planning and coordiantion training.
    Also I have steel nerves and that helps me a lot in life.

    For example I can wake up in 2:00 AM and study for the rest of a night and I can do it without problem since situation requires that.
    What I want to say is that I work toward goals and beign bored simply is not a part of that movie.
    You are a marvel. I need a smart J.

    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    After thinking about it for a day, I have come to realize, I don't get bored but I do get lonely.
    It's odd how they seem to relate, isn't it?

    I wonder about the implementation of boredom, that is to say, how can we feel the absence of something without knowing what that something is? It isn't like loss, where we have a before and after state. It's almost like the loss of potential, like we have a vision of what our life should be like, or how our life should feel, against which we compare our current state, and it is found to be wanting. As such, I guess it is almost inevitable for Ps - living in the world of possibilities, as they do....

    Quote Originally Posted by substitute View Post
    It's strange... whilst on the one hand I feel like I was practically born bored and that it's my natural state, on the other hand I know I've always got something to do and can always find things to do, never have difficulty occupying myself. And yet, whatever I'm doing most of the time, I'm still bored. About the only time I'm not even slightly bored, when the awareness of boredom is utterly banished (temporarily), is when I'm having a really fun, lively, intelligent and exploratory conversation with someone.
    Yeah. More of those please.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haphazard View Post
    I'm only bored when I'm upset.
    When I'm not, the things I do seem worth doing...
    I don't know if that is boredom, or mild depression, sometimes the edges blur.

    Quote Originally Posted by ImNotTooPopular View Post
    Nobody pointed this out yet, but I really think the characteristic with the strongest relationship to boredom is extroversion. Extroverts NEED external stimulation or the result is boredom. Most of the people here that report little to no boredom are introverts. I myself only get bored when I'm in a situation where I feel obligated to pay attention to the environment when something boring is going on. It manifests itself more like anxiousness or being antsy because I know as soon as I get out of that situation, I'll be okay. Generally, most strong introverts have so much going on in their heads that it's hard for them to get bored, and they generally have lifestyles that don't rely much on the environment for stimulation.

    S/N relates to the Big Five trait of Openness. High openness types (N) have a low tolerance for repetition and the familiar and look for novelty. Familiar things can become boring to them. Low openness types (S) have a low tolerance for novelty, and when exposed to too much, they feel a strong need for being around the familiar.

    J/P relates to Conscientiousness (C). People high in C (J's) are more disciplined and capable of continuing with work even if it is boring. Low C types (P's) are generally less professional, less formal, and more interested in fun.

    *late add on*

    I just thought of this. High openness types have a broad range of interests and the low openness types have a narrow range. So if you have 10 fields of interest instead of let's say 2, it's a lot easier to find something that will keep you from getting bored.
    I see where you're coming from, but I don't know if that's true. 10 things can become boring as easily as 2.
    I'm pretty sure I'm an introvert but I have a high capacity for boredom. I think the things that bore introverts and extroverts may well be different though. Introverts tend to have a more intense focus on fewer things and are less easily distracted. Extroverts seem to need more variety.

    Quote Originally Posted by Wade Wilson View Post
    Well, unfortunately it's piling a negative on top of a negative for me. To alleviate my boredom I engage in any various form of escapism which is only temporarily relieving me of the problem which, of course, returns once I get back to reality.

    My main issue is that without engaging in reckless behavior I don't really know how to find any consistent outlets for alleviating boredom. Ten years ago the answer would have been to quit my job, take all my money out of the bank and take a roadtrip to some random place. I got over that after about the fifth time of having to move back home broke & unemployed though.
    Yeah, been there, done that. The only comfort is that tolerance of boredom does seem to increase with age.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  6. #56
    & Badger, Ratty and Toad Mole's Avatar
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    Boredom is usually a cover for another emotion. For instance, when I say I am bored, what I mean is, I am angry.

    But really I am not owning my own anger and blaming someone else instead. So I will say, you are boring, rather than I am angry at this particular thing.

    If I could admit my anger to myself, my boredom would disappear.

    But my conscience or superego tells me that anger is bad, so I try and hide it behind boredom and blaming.

    So I am playing hide and seek with my anger to placate my superego.

    But the funny thing is that when I can say, I am angry at this particular thing, my anger transforms into exuberance.

    And this is true of all emotions - when we allow ourselves to feel them, they transform into something else. So when we allow ourselves to feel, we are constantly flowing emotion, like a constantly bubbling fountain of feeling. I think they call it, being alive.

    But my superego stops me being alive.

    How I hate my superego.

  7. #57
    Senior Member substitute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZiL View Post
    Lately I've been feeling like life is a grand struggle against boredom. For me, I'd say I get bored due to frustration with reality. As a kid, I was hyper and always had ideas and plans to entertain myself with, but as I've gotten older, I've realized that most of these ideas and plans will never come to fruition. I'm fighting this sense of futility that leads to boredom with everything. I thrive on the feeling that what I'm doing is part of some larger future goal, and when those goals feel uncertain, I get discouraged and bored pretty easily. That really sounds like a sort of depression, but I'm rarely sad, just lost.

    I can say that the boredom I've been experiencing lately is absolutely connected to questioning the pattern and progress of my life to date. I feel right now that I'm searching for some realistic larger goal or path to latch on to, and until I do, I find it hard to commit to things, which leads to boredom. To fight it I try to stay busy - do things that get me out of my comfort zone and make me consider new ideas or possibilities. I hope that if I find something new in this period of uncertaintly - if I try to widen my perspective - I'll be inspired again. It can be laborious though.

    Edit: I also try to keep a sense of humor about everything, to make it more bearable.
    Yet again, you're right inside my head!!

    Things I do need to have meaning, I need to see and feel where they fit into a bigger picture, how they enable progress towards a meaningful goal not just for my life but sorta making a difference in the world, leaving a legacy if you will. If I can't see this, then whatever I do, however superficially exciting - I'm bored, because it seems pointless to me.

    I think this could be one reason why I could never do the career in paid employment thing... I've been successful at self-employment because I could determine my own 'promotional ladder' as it were... but I could never do entry level stuff for long. For a while I was for example, photocopying the service sheets for my local church - a dull, routine, unchallenging and boring task. But I was able to do it for a while quite happily, only by reminding myself about how it fitted into the whole, how it enabled bigger things to happen that I believed in. Once I questioned those things though and couldn't believe they were happening any more, my work felt pointless and I just couldn't bear to do it, I'd come home at the end of a working morning and feel really profoundly depressed - as I say it had taken all my persuasion skills turned onto myself to keep doing it anyway, but once the meaning was lost I just couldn't do it a second longer and just quit without notice.

    I've had the same thing with jobs... I could go in at entry level and sustain interest as long as I believed a) the job I was currently doing was an important tile in a bigger mosaic that I believed in and was happy to help with enabling its continuing existence and b) it was a necessary step in a direction I wanted to go in and would enable progress for me in that direction. As soon as I had reason to question those points, the job became intolerable.
    Ils se d�merdent, les mecs: trop bon, trop con..................................MY BLOG!

    "When it all comes down to dust
    I will kill you if I must
    I will help you if I can" - Leonard Cohen

  8. #58
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by substitute View Post
    Yet again, you're right inside my head!!

    Things I do need to have meaning, I need to see and feel where they fit into a bigger picture, how they enable progress towards a meaningful goal not just for my life but sorta making a difference in the world, leaving a legacy if you will. If I can't see this, then whatever I do, however superficially exciting - I'm bored, because it seems pointless to me.

    I think this could be one reason why I could never do the career in paid employment thing... I've been successful at self-employment because I could determine my own 'promotional ladder' as it were... but I could never do entry level stuff for long. For a while I was for example, photocopying the service sheets for my local church - a dull, routine, unchallenging and boring task. But I was able to do it for a while quite happily, only by reminding myself about how it fitted into the whole, how it enabled bigger things to happen that I believed in. Once I questioned those things though and couldn't believe they were happening any more, my work felt pointless and I just couldn't bear to do it, I'd come home at the end of a working morning and feel really profoundly depressed - as I say it had taken all my persuasion skills turned onto myself to keep doing it anyway, but once the meaning was lost I just couldn't do it a second longer and just quit without notice.

    I've had the same thing with jobs... I could go in at entry level and sustain interest as long as I believed a) the job I was currently doing was an important tile in a bigger mosaic that I believed in and was happy to help with enabling its continuing existence and b) it was a necessary step in a direction I wanted to go in and would enable progress for me in that direction. As soon as I had reason to question those points, the job became intolerable.
    I feel the same way as you. As a matter of fact, I spent most of my mothering years either as a stay-at-home-mom or self-employed. I have a hard time working for other people because of the very reasons you just stated.

    I just started a job as an office assistant 3 weeks ago. So far so good, though it's a lot more intense than I was hoping for. And I feel like I'm keeping plates spinning on the tops of sticks - not something I like... but I'm hoping it will have a side benefit of preventing Alzheimer's!

  9. #59
    meh Salomé's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victor View Post
    How I hate my superego.
    I know the feeling....
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  10. #60
    Don't Judge Me! Haphazard's Avatar
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    I think I actually understood what Victor said this time.

    I'm so proud of myself.
    -Carefully taking sips from the Fire Hose of Knowledge

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