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  1. #1
    brainheart
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    Default The Instincts of Type Four in Literature

    I finished reading The Double by Dostoevsky last night. Talk about a wonderful example of the social four. Here's an excerpt (you can read all of it at http://fiction.eserver.org/novels/the_double.html):


    ... In this way, hesitating and seeking for the solution of his doubts, our hero ran to Semyonovsky Bridge; but while running to Semyonovsky Bridge he very rationally and conclusively decided to return. "It will be better so," he thought. "I had better try the other tack, that is . . . I will just go - I'll look on simply as an outsider, an outsider - and nothing more, whatever happens - it's not my fault, that's the fact of the matter! That's how it shall be now."

    Deciding to return, our hero actually did return, the more readily because with this happy thought he conceived of himself now as quite an outsider. "It's the best thing; one's not responsible for anything, and one will see all that's necessary . . . that's the fact of the matter!" It was a safe plan and that settled it.

    Reassured, he crept back under the peaceful shelter of his soothing and protecting woodstack, and began gazing intently at the window. This time he was not destined to gaze and wait long. Suddenly a strange commotion became apparent at all the windows. Figures appeared, curtains were drawn back, whole groups of people were crowding to the windows at Olsufy Ivanovitch's flat. All were peeping out looking for something in the yard. From the security of his woodstack, our hero, too, began with curiosity watching the general commotion, and with interest craned forward to right and to left so far as he could within the shadow of the woodstack. Suddenly he started, held his breath and almost sat down with horror. It seemed to him - in short, he realized, that they were looking for nothing and for nobody but him, Mr. Golyadkin! Every one was looking in his direction. It was impossible to escape; they saw him . . . In a flutter, Mr. Golyadkin huddled as closely as he could to the woodstack, and only then noticed that the treacherous shadow had betrayed him, that it did not cover him completely. Our hero would have been delighted at that moment to creep into a mouse-hole in the woodstack, and there meekly to remain, if only it had been possible. But it was absolutely impossible. In his agony he began at last staring openly and boldly at the windows, it was the best thing to do. . . . And suddenly he glowed with shame. He had been fully discovered, every one was staring at him at once, they were all waving their hands, all were nodding their heads at him, all were calling to him; then several windows creaked as they opened, several voices shouted something to him at once. . . . "I wonder why they don't whip these naughty girls as children," our hero muttered to himself, losing his head completely...
    I think fours express themselves most accurately in the arts so I think this is a great way to show the enneagram four instincts in action.

    Anyone else have other examples? (I can think of a number off the top of my head but I'm going to leave it at this for now.)

  2. #2
    Senior Member Cloud of Thunder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainheart View Post
    I finished reading The Double by Dostoevsky last night. Talk about a wonderful example of the social four. Here's an excerpt (you can read all of it at http://fiction.eserver.org/novels/the_double.html):




    I think fours express themselves most accurately in the arts so I think this is a great way to show the enneagram four instincts in action.

    Anyone else have other examples? (I can think of a number off the top of my head but I'm going to leave it at this for now.)
    Anna Karenina is the perfect example of the Sexual 4w3.

    The narrator/protagonist of Confessions of a Mask is an obvious 4w5.
    The only way out is through. The faster you're in, the better.

  3. #3
    brainheart
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cloud of Thunder View Post
    Anna Karenina is the perfect example of the Sexual 4w3.

    The narrator/protagonist of Confessions of a Mask is an obvious 4w5.
    Yeah, AK for sure, same with Madame Bovary:

    Love, she thought, must come suddenly, with great outbursts and lightnings,--a hurricane of the skies, which falls upon life, revolutionises it, roots up the will like a leaf, and sweeps the whole heart into the abyss. (Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary)


    I don't know Confessions of a Mask.


    My guess is Jane Eyre would be an example of a sp/sx 4w5:

    I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. (Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre)



    Esther Greenwood of the Bell Jar is a good example of a sx/sp four:

    If neurotic is wanting two mutually exclusive things at one and the same time, then I'm neurotic as hell. I'll be flying back and forth between one mutually exclusive thing and another for the rest of my days....

    ... because wherever I sat—on the deck of a ship or at a street café in Paris or Bangkok—I would be sitting under the same glass bell jar, stewing in my own sour air.
    ( Sylvia Plath, The Bell Jar)

  4. #4
    Whisky Old & Women Young Speed Gavroche's Avatar
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    Speaking about Dostoevsky, the character of Ivan Karmasov from TBK is a very good example of So/Sp 4w5.

    Also, Emma Bovary is a Sp/Sx 4w3.
    EsTP 6w7 Sx/Sp

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    E=60% S=55% T=70% P=80%

    "I don't believe in guilt, I only believe in living on impulses"

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    can't handcuff the wind Z Buck McFate's Avatar
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    Madame Bovary is the first character who came to mind in reading the op, though no passages in particular immediately come to mind.

    Ivan Karamazov though? I've long thought Ivan was prototype 5: trying to get rid of existential distress by intellectualizing the crap out of it. He doesn't relish in or romanticize it at all- he just wants the perfect rational formula to make it go away.
    Reality is a collective hunch. -Lily Tomlin

    5w4 sx/sp Johari / Nohari

  6. #6
    Senior Member Cloud of Thunder's Avatar
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    Confessions of a Mask is an autobiographical novel by Japanese author Yukio Mishima (who himself was a 4), chronicling everything from his childhood, his sexual awakening, to his fantasies about death. It's quite a read.
    The only way out is through. The faster you're in, the better.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by brainheart View Post
    My guess is Jane Eyre would be an example of a sp/sx 4w5:

    I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself. (Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre)
    wow yes this, love it

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