User Tag List

123 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 41

  1. #1
    [bento boxed] EJCC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    ESTJ
    Enneagram
    173 so/sx
    Posts
    18,259

    Default What type did your culture raise you to be?

    The stereotype / common wisdom is that women are raised to be enneagram 2 (nurturing, caring, helpful), and men are raised to be enneagram 8 (protective, dominant, competitive). That has been my experience in predominantly white subsections of American society, as well as my personal experience (I'm still trying to tone down my overcompensatory 2 wing), but that's it.

    As a counterexample, one of my best friends, a Puerto Rican woman (3w2) who is as into the Enneagram as I am, strongly believes that Latinas in America are raised to be enneagram 8. She's the one who first posed this question to me - but she's not on the forum, so I'm bringing the question here instead.

    Especially interested in feedback from non-Americans, and American PoC. But I'm obviously well aware that the OP doesn't have a monopoly of control over the conversation.

    Thoughts?
    EJCC: "The Big Questions in my life right now: 1) What am I willing to live with? 2) What do I have to live with? 3) What can I change for the better?"
    Coriolis: "Is that the ESTJ Serenity Prayer?"

    ESTJ - LSE - ESTj (mbti/socionics)
    1w2/7w6/3w4 so/sx (enneagram)
    lawful good (D&D) / ravenclaw + wampus (HP) / boros legion (M:TG)
    conscientious > sensitive > serious (oldham)
    want to ask me something? go for it!
    Likes Cat Brainz, Lotus, Fay liked this post

  2. #2
    Obliviously Mad Ashtart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEI Ni
    Posts
    556

    Default

    Well, I was definitely raised in a way that would make me a type 5. The expectations were 2, of course, but the way I was raised would really describe as people trying to turn someone in a 5. No wonder why it is my wing (so strong that I believed I was a 5 for a good time). The fact that I have 6 and 8 in my tritype was very unwelcoming, but I really don't care.
    "If the truth shall kill them, let them die"

    468: The Truth Teller [4w5 - 6w5 - 8w7].
    Ni 45.1|Ne 38.4|Ti 35.1|Te 33.2|Fi 32.1|Si 30.2|Se 29.2|Fe 18.8
    .
    Likes EJCC liked this post

  3. #3
    Queen hunter Virtual ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    8,584

    Default

    I would say 7 ... if you can do it tomorrow do it tomorrow. If you can solve it with improvisation improvise. Who knows maybe the world will end today and we don't want to have regrets. (what is byproducts the endless cycle of wars and dictatorships that goes all the way to collapse of the Roman Empire)


    As said trully plenty of times: I have huge problems with twisting typology that it fits environment in which I was growing up. For example typology fails to notice that an 8 that is born in totalitarian system may be more openminded towards not having perfect control. Since that is not realistic expectation, therefore he is likely to creep around the edges of the society. Since that is the most independant you can get.


    So yeah, culture and even more political reality can totally twist the types.
    Likes EJCC liked this post

  4. #4

    Default

    1w2, I think

  5. #5
    militat omnis amans magpie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    614 sx/so
    Posts
    3,285

    Default

    This isn't what the OP is actually about, but being a 6 isn't really a personality. It's when survival mechanisms are ingrained into your personality throughout your life. It's a way to survive and if you grow up with enough stuff that challenges your survival, it becomes who you are. This isn't particularly cultural. Just one person's subjective experiences.

    If I were the same person living a different life I wouldn't be a 6 and nor would I be the MBTI type that I am. Nurture twists and shapes nature and makes you sort of pan-type.
    Likes EJCC, Smilephantomhive, yama, Xann liked this post

  6. #6
    Senior Member Atomic Fiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    MBTI
    ESTP
    Enneagram
    873 sx/so
    Socionics
    SLE Ti
    Posts
    7,063

    Default

    Hatians are strict traditionalist. A common belief is that all Hatians act the same way and have the same roles. There are no LGBTQ hations, but I've been on the streets long enough to know that they exist and they're looking for new places to live because their parents kicked them out.

  7. #7
    Obliviously Mad Ashtart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Socionics
    IEI Ni
    Posts
    556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magpie View Post
    This isn't what the OP is actually about, but being a 6 isn't really a personality. It's when survival mechanisms are ingrained into your personality throughout your life. It's a way to survive and if you grow up with enough stuff that challenges your survival, it becomes who you are. This isn't particularly cultural. Just one person's subjective experiences.

    If I were the same person living a different life I wouldn't be a 6 and nor would I be the MBTI type that I am. Nurture twists and shapes nature and makes you sort of pan-type.
    This.
    "If the truth shall kill them, let them die"

    468: The Truth Teller [4w5 - 6w5 - 8w7].
    Ni 45.1|Ne 38.4|Ti 35.1|Te 33.2|Fi 32.1|Si 30.2|Se 29.2|Fe 18.8
    .

  8. #8
    Senior Member Cat Brainz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    2,912

    Default

    This is a topic I have pondered on regarding the way my culture has affected my typing. The culture I grew up in is very 269 tritype so that has probably made my w6 on my 7 and the w2 on my 3 stronger than typical for one of my tri and why I mistyped as a 2w3 not a 3w2 since its heavily grained into me to be super nice and helpful so kinda like a purple circle that thinks hes blue as it was grained into him ot be more blue than typical for his natural ways.

  9. #9
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,338

    Default

    While nurturing affects us, I don't think it's all of the picture -- because we still end up being different even when raised in the same environment. Basically, whatever our internal preferences are clash or meld with the external forces acting on us to produce an end (and probably evolving throughout life) result. Basically we all start with some raw materials that can differ, and then the environment pings off us, determining how these materials are developed, denied, embraced, or whatever.

    If I look at the earliest traits I possessed in life, I would say "thoughtful curiosity" was one of the first and major components of "me." I wanted to understand the world, and I would take continual measured approaches to exploration -- i.e., I'm not the kid who just ran out on the ice to see what would happen, even though I surely wanted to know, I would try to understand ice first and watch other safer experiments before risking myself on it (as an example). [Of course, even there you see my focus on anxiety/fear... I was afraid of things I did not understand, so I quickly focused on learning and understanding so as to master my fear.]

    Words also allowed me to better understand my world; I taught myself to read at age 4-5, although my parents didn't find out until my teacher told them I could. I've always been articulate and read voraciously when young.

    That detached/thoughtful focus on learning and understanding (as the primary effort) is a vintage Five pattern. Also, "detachment" versus "moving against" -- and I would "move towards" only when I could not detach.

    In the rural religious environment I grew up in (and since I was being raised as male), I felt pressure towards Six and later in life towards Eight. I ended up picking up a lot of Nine instead, as my "diplomatic face" in a conflict-torn family and a culture that wanted to change me. The parts of Five that are appreciated (being smart, getting good grades, becoming accomplished in areas of interest) were all supported by my culture and admired, but my lack of social ambition about how to leverage them was not approved of... I was expected to compete and succeed, whereas I was just happy living in my room, doing my thing, and furthering my own understanding of life and pursuing my own creative ventures.

    My mom is a clear Two, and I think my sister is as well... and she was definitely raised to emulate Two behaviors. I was expected to do a bit of that in terms of being polite and kind, write thank you letters to show appreciation, and help people in need... but I was never expected to go to the lengths that my sister was. In a lot of ways, I was allowed to just do the bare minimum there but not have to overextend myself.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft
    Likes Starry liked this post

  10. #10
    Butterfly Amargith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Enfp
    Enneagram
    497 sx/so
    Socionics
    IEx None
    Posts
    14,569

    Default

    3 or 6.
    ★ڿڰۣ✿ℒoѵℯ✿ڿڰۣ★





    "Be careful what you believe, because that is the world you'll create - Cassie Nightingale

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO