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  1. #11
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    There are a great deal more than nine types in the enneagram. If you factor in a type’s wing that number instantly grows to 18. There six variants that will raise the number to 108. This is considered before speculating on other factors such as tri-fix, triads and your level of health.

    I think what the personality type system does is attempt to oversimplify which is why many follow it. Yet even then most are not appreciating the fluidity of the system, and considering that Jung never referred to simple dichotomies. In fact, Jung was against using his work to create full blown personality typing. It is my understanding that he expounded on Freud’s work to determine that there are more than just extroverted types (notice the different spelling) and subsequently realized that not only are there extraverted/introverted types, but for some reason people use the attitudes differently resulting in his functions.

    The enneagram is highly complex, and as such anyone who has a low threshold for complexity will not tolerate following the system. I tend to step back from the enneagram for several years to digest what I have learned and then return. When I step back from personality type, it’s usually because I have become bored with the system until I find another component worth learning.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    I was reading yesterday that the Enneagram was developed by some ancient Muslims, then further developed by some others. Who's to say that any of those people were even right?

    Who's to say there are only 9 basic motivations in the world? What if there are 12?

    Somebody tell me why I should believe it's accurate at describing people.
    After you read the books I recommended, you will see the depth of the Enneagram. It is not an easy concept to absorb and the nuggets of information available on the internet do not provide the whole picture. I have read Helen Palmer, Riso-Hudson, and Father Richard Rohr ( a Catholic priest who has been a frequent guest on Dr. Oz's XM radio show) and have found Hurley and Dobson to be the most clear description of the Enneagram.

    You will have to do the work to determine if the Enneagram is true for you. It is true for me.

  3. #13
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    This thread does raise the question as to whether it is one more stereotype of this system to say that Se types have less tolerance for theory than Ne Types. I say that because you're not alone "Mom" and other people who prefer intuition have an arduous time comprehending the enneagram.

  4. #14
    Lex Parsimoniae Xander's Avatar
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    I wouldn't have believed the theory as working if it had not worked in my case. Who knows, perhaps it doesn't work for everyone? No system does I believe. I know those who refute the MBTI saying that either the boxes are fortune tellers (ie telling porkies) or they can't work. How can there be only 16 types of people?
    Isn't it time for a colourful metaphor?

  5. #15
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    The MBTI only covers differences in cognitive processes if I remember correctly, and from there we can derive 16 different combinations. These combinations allows them to infer further into a person's behavior. It's a given that we haven't covered everything there is to personality but we have to start somewhere. From here all we need to do is to refine and polish. I have met people who are the same type who are nothing alike, yet they both claim that the type fits them perfectly.

    The enneagram profiles just seem more... melodramatic to me.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member INTJMom's Avatar
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    That's a lot to think about.

    Quote Originally Posted by "?" View Post
    There are a great deal more than nine types in the enneagram. If you factor in a type’s wing that number instantly grows to 18.
    My math isn't that great but wouldn't it be 27? Doesn't each type have 2 wings available, or am I mistaken?

    There six variants that will raise the number to 108. This is considered before speculating on other factors such as tri-fix, triads and your level of health.
    ...
    The enneagram is highly complex, and as such anyone who has a low threshold for complexity will not tolerate following the system. I tend to step back from the enneagram for several years to digest what I have learned and then return. When I step back from personality type, it’s usually because I have become bored with the system until I find another component worth learning.
    I wonder if I should bother delving into it, if it really is that complex.
    I hate overly complicated things.

    Even MBTT was hard for me to comprehend.

  7. #17
    Senior Member "?"'s Avatar
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    I think we have to keep in mind that, and refrain from, attempting to correlate even systems that refer to Meyers-Briggs' four letter codes. Keirsey, Socionics, the Tiegers, Otto Kroeger, the BBC and Best Fit Types refer to the four letter codes, however have differing theories and definitely different descriptions.

    Clearly the enneagram does not correlate well with MBTI, and usually even enneagram theorists don't equally agree with each other. Wedekit is correct in the refining and polishing, but that does not equate to correlating the systems. I think finding the system that works best for you personally is better and being comfortable with that system, which means debates on varied systems is really a moot point.

  8. #18
    Occasional Member Evan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by INTJMom View Post
    My math isn't that great but wouldn't it be 27? Doesn't each type have 2 wings available, or am I mistaken?
    2*9 = 18 (this is assuming you either have one wing or the other)

    then there are 6 variant stackings possible:
    sx/sp
    sx/so
    sp/sx
    sp/so
    so/sx
    so/sp

    18*6 = 108

    but yeah, i agree with you. the whole 9 types (or 18, or 108) thing seems much more arbitrary than MBTI, since MBTI is based on opposing cognitive processes, and enneagram just randomly chose 9 as the number of primary coping strategies.

  9. #19
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    Hurley states wings only apply to indicate your support center, which is the center closest to your preferred center. The centers are Thinking (Types 5, 6, 7), Doing (Types 8, 9, 1), and Feeling (Types 2, 3, 4). Types 3, 6, and 9 do not have wings at all. So an example would be a Type 4 could only have 5 as a wing, since the Feeling center is preferred and supported by the Thinking center. The Doing center is repressed for the Type 4.

    According to the theory, you are only one Enneagram type.

  10. #20
    Senior Member wedekit's Avatar
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    I find the enneagram extremely useful when brainstorming characters for fiction. Even more useful than the MBTI. Of course, when I take the character to the next step I convert their enneagram type into the best fitting MBTI type (which normally takes a long time for me to finally settle on one). I see the use for both systems as revolutionary in the field of personality psychology, but maybe not the most reliable at the moment. I would encourage both systems to continue developing and maybe at some point they will be developed enough to represent two separate and distinct layers of our personality.

    I would love to dedicate my life to social/personality psychology, but all of the grad schools I encounter have little interest or concentration on personality typology... which is really disappointing. I would probably die happy if I could find a way to dedicate my life to this, as well as teach and write books.
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