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  1. #11
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mal12345 View Post
    They read YA fiction because they are light-weights when it comes to reading fiction.
    I minored in English lit at Uni and have read plenty of great, complex fiction as well as YA. I just like variation.

    It's no different to film. How many people only watch complex, intellectual film?


    Personally I enjoy a good blockbuster as well as something by Malick, Altman, or Kubrick.
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    they've gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the colour of my mind.

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  2. #12
    Senior Member Mal12345's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    I minored in English lit at Uni and have read plenty of great, complex fiction as well as YA. I just like variation.

    It's no different to film. How many people only watch complex, intellectual film?


    Personally I enjoy a good blockbuster as well as something by Malick, Altman, or Kubrick.
    You like all kinds of fiction, both higher and lower, therefore what I said doesn't apply to you.

    As for me, lightweight reading means something Stephen Kingish. And his kind of writing constitutes probably the lion's share of all modern fiction. The magical adventures of Harry Potter don't interest me in the slightest.
    "Everyone has a plan till they get punched in the mouth." Mike Tyson
    “Culture?” says Paul McCartney. “This isn't culture. It's just a good laugh.”

  3. #13
    Member ScareBear's Avatar
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    My issue is with content. I would prefer to read YA because I don't have to worry about much cursing or sex. Plus the YA section seems to center around unique ideas and possibilities (a school for witches and wizards or post apocalyptic societies).
    “We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.” -Walt Disney

  4. #14
    Pubic Enemy #1 Crabs's Avatar
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    maybe it appeals to the young at heart. it's like a fantasy vacation from all the responsibilities of being an adult.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Passacaglia's Avatar
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    I imagine that a few people do read YA fiction due to low reading comprehension; but then people tend to avoid doing things they're not good at, so I suspect that most people who don't read well would rather be reading the tv guide.

    I myself read the Chronicles of Narnia because I had somehow gotten to my 20s before reading this classic fantasy series; I read the Hunger Games because it was recommended to me, and I read Catching Fire and The Mockingjay because the entire trilogy is just so original and compelling; I read all seven Harry Potters for much the same reason. (I even camped outside of a bookstore with some friends and a lot of cosplaying teens on the eve of the release of The Deathly Hallows just to get a copy at midnight!)

    Long story short, I read good fiction, whatever the big-word count is. I suspect many adults do the same, with some of them favoring YA fiction because the light reading is better for the bus ride home, or the business flight to wherever, or those few free minutes here and there when they find themselves with nothing to do.
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  6. #16
    Sheep pill, broster asynartetic's Avatar
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    We live in a culture where lines between adolescent and non-adolescent pursuits, hobbies, media have been blurred. Grown men collect toys, middle aged moms read teen vampire romance novels, young toddlers accompany parents to the firing range for target practice.

    Similarly, the lines between high brow and low brow media have been highly blurred, practically erased completely. A person might be listening to Philip Glass one minute, Weird Al the next. John Seabrook | Stories | Nobrow Culture There is nothing wrong with this.

    @Mal12345, I wouldn't argue Stephen King is anything but lightweight, yet it's interesting how the resurgence of horror literature as a genre to be taken seriously in the latter half of the 20th century can at least in part be credited to his popularity. Obviously there'd been Mary Shelley, Poe, and others who'd written intelligent horror before King, but by the mid 20th century, horror fiction largely resided in the realm of dime pulp novels. King can at least partly be credited with bringing it back as a genre to be appreciated in both popular and academic circles.

  7. #17
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    There is a huge difference between one who reads YA fiction on occasion, and, for example, Bronies. Bronies: The Extremely Unexpected Adult Fans of My - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    For the record, I would much prefer to read Harry Potter books than 50 Shades of Grey. And I don't like the Harry Potter books that much.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.
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  8. #18
    Suave y Fuerte BadOctopus's Avatar
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    @uumlau I'm hesitant to watch that clip, for fear that once I watch it, I cannot unwatch it.
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  9. #19
    Happy Dancer uumlau's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BadOctopus View Post
    @uumlau I'm hesitant to watch that clip, for fear that once I watch it, I cannot unwatch it.
    UnWATCHing it is easy.

    UnHEARING it is difficult.

    Unfortunately, you don't even need to click on it to hear it in your head, so your mind has already been poisoned.
    An argument is two people sharing their ignorance.

    A discussion is two people sharing their understanding, even when they disagree.
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  10. #20
    failed poetry slam career chubber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by uumlau View Post
    UnWATCHing it is easy.

    UnHEARING it is difficult.

    Unfortunately, you don't even need to click on it to hear it in your head, so your mind has already been poisoned.
    I just keep seeing the parrot (Iago) from Aladdin, walking on Jafar's shoulders rambling about the book.
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