User Tag List

First 78910 Last

Results 81 to 90 of 96

  1. #81
    I want my account deleted
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tiltyred View Post
    I think he did well to hang in there for 63 years.... I don't blame him if he just couldn't go on, was tired of struggling.
    ^^ I agree with this. I find it interesting that in this culture, people can say that suicide is a selfish act, but at the same time feel perfectly okay asking/demanding that someone in pain stays around to make them feel better/to be with them. That seems just as selfish, to me. And I could easily see Robin William's pain in his stand-up, it was just .... there, so obvious.
    Last edited by Bellflower; 08-14-2014 at 03:04 PM. Reason: Situation was resolved...thanks

  2. #82
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    https://celebrity.yahoo.com/news/rob...182038139.html

    Susan Schneider, the wife of Robin Williams, has disclosed that her late husband had early stages of Parkinson's disease at the time of his death earlier this week.
    Welp, there we go -- one of the missing links. That would be extremely devastating for a physical comic... plus the thought of his family having to look after him.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #83
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    468 sx/sp
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    4,383

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    https://celebrity.yahoo.com/news/rob...182038139.html



    Welp, there we go -- one of the missing links. That would be extremely devastating for a physical comic... plus the thought of his family having to look after him.
    Plus the realization that there is no cure.

  4. #84
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YUI View Post
    I don't mean to beat a dead horse. But here's another article examining Robin Williams's suicide from the point of view of a middle-aged Boomer suicide:

    Robin Williams in a group facing higher risk of suicide: Older white men with depression - The Washington Post

    As the article points out, ultimately one can only speculate as to exactly what Robin Williams was going through. But for now the media seem to be using the occasion as a "teachable moment" on the subject of male boomer suicides.

    Of course, there probably aren't many male boomers among the TypoC membership (besides moi), so I'll drop the subject after this post.
    Well, at this point, it looks like it was a little more than the "middle-aged Boomer suicide" you had wondered about -- he was facing a pretty horrific loss (basically everything he felt he specifically was as a person) and I can understand his choice in that context even if I can't be sure what I would have done in his situation. Pretty damned overwhelming for anyone. It really boils down to himself and his family at that point; I feel bad for all of them

    Michael J. Fox is the most equivalent person who comes to mind right now, but I don't consider Fox's core identity to be so intrinsically tied to his ability to emote and project with his physical body and face. And like Tilty says, there is no cure (although with treatment the symptoms can be improved in some cases).

    I also find it interesting that low dopamine is correlated in some way with Parkinson's. Maybe I'm really off here, I'm not a doctor; but it makes you wonder how much of his past self-medicative behaviors were related.

    Most types of reward increase the level of dopamine in the brain, and a variety of addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity.

    EDIT: Speaking of Michael J. Fox:
    https://gma.yahoo.com/michael-j-fox-...lebrities.html

    Fox's Twitter feed:
    Stunned to learn Robin had PD. Pretty sure his support for our Fdn predated his diagnosis. A true friend; I wish him peace.
    It took Fox seven years to publicly announce his PD...
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  5. #85
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    MBTI
    INFP
    Posts
    617

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Well, at this point, it looks like it was a little more than the "middle-aged Boomer suicide" you had wondered about [...]
    What's it called? Kidsplaining--when a youngster tells an oldtimer what it's like to be old?

    My posts (and the articles that I linked) talked about age-related infirmities as one of the things that causes a male boomer to question his life and sometimes off himself as a result. And "age-related infirmities" is a eumphemism for precisely things like Parkinsons, Alzheimers, quadruple bypasses, cancer, emphysema, organ replacements, and so on and so on--the kind of debiltating stuff that turns you from "breadwinner" into "burden on the family."

    In my earlier post I said said:

    [...] their creativity may be stripped from them by infirmity, loss of mental accuity, physical decline, etc. Unwilling to accept that loss, some creative types rebel by committing suicide.
    I didn't know that Williams had Parkinsons, precisely. But for example I knew that he had pretty severe heart problems and took it hard. The Parkinsons would be another nail in that particular coffin. Boomer suicides are precisely about that sort of thing. Some prospect that causes their life to change suddenly: The end of youth, and the start of a colder, grayer, more dependent existence.

    Anyway, what did you think I was talking about--the onset of baldness or gray hair causing boomers to commit suicide? C'mon, the boomers aren't *that* vain.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    [...]he was facing a pretty horrific loss (basically everything he felt he specifically was as a person)
    That's precisely what I meant when I spoke of a "stripping-away and letting-go."

    Maybe you're not understanding what I said because I was talking in generalities and not identifying specific illnesses or financial problems or whatever. But at least in my own mind, I was talking about precisely the kinds of things you brought up in these latest posts.

    Oh well, I'll drop the subject for real this time. You young people don't need to hear about old-age issues. Your time will come soon enough. In the meantime, enjoy your youth.

  6. #86
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YUI View Post
    What's it called? Kidsplaining--when a youngster tells an oldtimer what it's like to be old?
    I'm not William's age, but he wasn't old enough to be in my parent's age bracket either. I don't really view myself as a "youngster" or a "kid," thanks.

    My posts (and the articles that I linked) talked about age-related infirmities as one of the things that causes a male boomer to question his life and sometimes off himself as a result. And "age-related infirmities" is a eumphemism for precisely things like Parkinsons, Alzheimers, quadruple bypasses, cancer, emphysema, organ replacements, and so on and so on--the kind of debiltating stuff that turns you from "breadwinner" into "burden on the family."
    Why is this even a point of contention? It's blatantly obvious. There's a bunch of stuff that can happen as we age, and he was in his 60's. Heck, I have a relative dying of colon cancer right now, and one of my parents is dead, and have had some health issues myself that only seem to increase in severity as I age.

    I didn't know that Williams had Parkinsons, precisely. But for example I knew that he had pretty severe heart problems and took it hard. The Parkinsons would be another nail in that particular coffin. Boomer suicides are precisely about that sort of thing. Some prospect that causes their life to change suddenly: The end of youth, and the start of a colder, grayer, more dependent existence.
    Certainly that's going to be part of it -- but it's the generalized part that every person experiences. I was making the point that Parkinson's is pretty much an Achilles heel style of infirmity for him, in addition to whatever other "old timer" infirmities you'd like to trot out. For me, ever since I started having memory issues ten years ago, I've had to wonder how I would face losing my ability to think clearly / make mental connections, or how I would take physical infirmities that impact my ability to play music -- because those things are of special importance to me and things I have built my identity around. Yes, I might get diabetes or have heart congestion, and those things would also impact quality of life, but they wouldn't hit me in the place where I have my IDENTITY constructed. Kind of like Mencken getting aphasia... for a bricklayer, maybe not a big deal, but for a writer with sharp wit?

    Anyway, what did you think I was talking about--the onset of baldness or gray hair causing boomers to commit suicide? C'mon, the boomers aren't *that* vain.
    humor or pretension -- you make the call.

    That's precisely what I meant when I spoke of a "stripping-away and letting-go."

    Maybe you're not understanding what I said because I was talking in generalities and not identifying specific illnesses or financial problems or whatever. But at least in my own mind, I was talking about precisely the kinds of things you brought up in these latest posts.
    Actually, you're the one who seems to be viewing this as purely age-related physical issues that result in some gross generalized decline that every human experiences, while I was specifically pinpointing an infirmity that hits someone right in the core of their IDENTITY in addition to all the other age-related issues that you feel the need to point out as if everyone here is too inexperienced to be aware of them.

    Oh well, I'll drop the subject for real this time. You young people don't need to hear about old-age issues. Your time will come soon enough. In the meantime, enjoy your youth.
    I was just being courteous and relaying information earlier when I clarified for you that he had Parkinson's, I wasn't attempting to suggest your concerns about his age weren't relevant. I just think for the reasons above that this was likely a significant issue beyond all the obvious age related issues you were concerned about. If you think it isn't, that's fine. I don't have any further point.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  7. #87
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    10,082

  8. #88
    failed poetry slam career chubber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    5w4 sp/sx
    Socionics
    ILI Te
    Posts
    4,223

    Default

    I wonder if he felt really alone to go the suicide route.

  9. #89
    Senior Member Tiltyred's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    468 sx/sp
    Socionics
    EII None
    Posts
    4,383

    Default

    He had to have felt really alone while he did it, at least. And alone while he planned it. Miserable thinking about his wife and children afterwards. ... This is why I was saying I wish somehow it would be all right for people to decide to end their lives. It would be gentler on everyone. Now it's not just that he's dead, but there's the suicide factor on top of it that we have to think about. It adds a larger weight to the grief.

    And p.s., I get that the best solution would be that people don't want to end their lives, I get that -- but it seems impossible. Despite having all the best resources available to them, some people just refuse to go on. Like, I dig that it shouldn't happen -- but it does.

  10. #90
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    MBTI
    ISTJ
    Enneagram
    9w8
    Posts
    10,082

    Default

    I can see how the knowledge of having Parkinsons might have pushed him to it.

Similar Threads

  1. Robin Williams
    By NewEra in forum Celebrity Personality Types
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: 09-04-2017, 10:57 PM
  2. Will Rogers and Robin Williams
    By deepthought in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-22-2009, 01:25 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO