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  1. #21
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    You're all forgetting Meteor Man. Loved this movie as a kid! Though in retrospect, it was a terrible movie. I was a naive child. Perhaps, it should be re-made with a better script. His costume was cool.


  2. #22
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Purists are annoying. If it wasn't Electro, whoever he is, being Black, they would complain about something else, like the webs on the Spiderman costume being in the wrong place or something.

    I get that when you like a story, you get attached to the medium you first experienced in, but demanding 100% fidelity to that medium is ridiculous.

    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    While I understand the desire for accuracy, the purists can be ridiculous. Some people are still having an aneurysm over Man of Steel because Henry Cavill doesn't have the curl of hair in the middle of his forehead and doesn't wear his underpants on the outside.
    My favorite one is people complaining about how the Klingons in Star Trek Into Darkness don't like like Original Series Klingons.



    Because that totally wasn't something they only did because of the budget they had at the time, and a movie with 100 times that budget should stick to that.

    Also I just got through some mad stuff on Cracked.com about eighties movies, Rocky and Rambo, essentially being propaganda for white Americans down about vietnam, Muhammed Ali and black athletes, and a counter blast about how eighties sports movies made it right to hate on hard work and accomplishment through talent.
    No, we value meritocracy and personal responsibility in the U.S.. Don't be ridiculous. A politician told me that and everything.

    Also, Donald Glover should have been Spiderman. Of course, the purists would have really flipped their lids then.
    [Trump's] rhetoric is not an abuse of power. In the same way that it's also not against the law to do a backflip off of the roof of your house onto your concrete driveway. It's just mind-numbingly stupid and, to say the least, counterproductive. - Bush did 9-11


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  3. #23
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    As long as they stay away from playing James Bond (in the official EON cannon), black actors can do whatever the fuck they want. It's bad enough that they strayed from the tall and swarthy Celtic archetype.

    And I kinda figured black people would be the ones offended...by someone of their race playing a villain. Remember when Michael Clarke Duncan played the Kingpin in Daredevil? Oh yes, there was a Daredevil movie! And it starred Ben Affleck! That's right, Ben Affleck was an actor before he became a director!

    As for this new Spider-Man 2, I'm sure it will be every bit a waste of time as The Amazing Spider-Man. Why did they have to reboot the franchise? Remember when they continued the same movie timelines with different actors?

  4. #24
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    If they say, got a Hispanic actor and then added some Spanish lines to the character's repertoire, that would be a change - he'd be someone else. If he's black but acts the part of the character without somehow "making him a black guy" (in mannerism or alteration of content, other characters alluding to it etc), whatever.

    If they rewrote the comic as a guy with a different background or behavior, I mean, it's a comic book movie, I don't really care, but that'd be odd in a way. It wouldn't be the same thing. I suppose they rewrite foreign films with local actors though...

    To clarify, I don't just mean they changed the race of the actor, but they changed the character to fit the stereotypes of what that race (or really any other grouping) is, then it'd be a different character. Which might work, or might not, but it wouldn't really be the same.

    But in the case of Gatsby, for instance (which I didn't see, but I recall the book), merely another race (with the same character) would be odd and disconcerting and would take away from the movie because of the setting.

    But some genre's get away with intentional alteration of time, place, and character. Anything based on Shakespeare, for instance.
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bamboo View Post
    But some genre's get away with intentional alteration of time, place, and character. Anything based on Shakespeare, for instance.
    I had a great time when I saw Othello live with Patrick Stewart playing the title role and the rest of the cast was black.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #26
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Yeah, I never read the comics, so i'd be none the wiser, but i really don't see the big deal with it. The funny thing about the hunger games in the book the character they made the fuss about was black in the book. People just can't read, neither can I
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    Yeah, I never read the comics, so i'd be none the wiser, but i really don't see the big deal with it. The funny thing about the hunger games in the book the character they made the fuss about was black in the book. People just can't read, neither can I
    People just don't think outside their own race. Except when you're a minority, and you generally assume most characters are white unless stated otherwise.

  8. #28
    Away with the fairies Southern Kross's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    People just don't think outside their own race. Except when you're a minority, and you generally assume most characters are white unless stated otherwise.
    Exactly.

    In The Hunger Games the author didn't go out of her way to explicitly emphasise the race of Rue. Her physically description was that she had dark skin, but that line could easily have been missed. The thing is, the character was meant to symbolise innocence, purity and sweetness, the sort of role that is typically taken by a blond-haired, blue-eyed, white girl, and that was the image many people created in their head. Then when the role was cast, people refused to accept that Rue could be anything other than white, because it would completely undermine the racist archetypes that are ingrained in their heads. I think some even pointed out to them the line which indicates she's black, and still they wouldn't accept the truth. People won't even admit that those archetypes are ingrained (or that they are inherently racist), but they react so extremely when those roles are threatened. Black people are fine, as long as they stay in their place. And that place is usually in the margins, where they won't get in the way of the real story (about white people).
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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Southern Kross View Post
    Exactly.

    In The Hunger Games the author didn't go out of her way to explicitly emphasise the race of Rue. Her physically description was that she had dark skin, but that line could easily have been missed. The thing is, the character was meant to symbolise innocence, purity and sweetness, the sort of role that is typically taken by a blond-haired, blue-eyed, white girl, and that was the image many people created in their head. Then when the role was cast, people refused to accept that Rue could be anything other than white, because it would completely undermine the racist archetypes that are ingrained in their heads. I think some even pointed out to them the line which indicates she's black, and still they wouldn't accept the truth. People won't even admit that those archetypes are ingrained (or that they are inherently racist), but they react so extremely when those roles are threatened. Black people are fine, as long as they stay in their place. And that place is usually in the margins, where they won't get in the way of the real story (about white people).
    What's just funny, and twisted, is that you (and I) don't even get the luxury of just imagining such characters as being of our own ethnicity/race, if you live in this country. Everything is portrayed in such a one sided manner that you simply stop thinking of the stories from your own racial perspective. It's even more obvious when you go to other countries and see how they react to American media, and the stereotypes they build about America based on it. It's been getting a lot better in recent years though.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Bamboo's Avatar
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    People are disturbed by the unfamiliar. I don't doubt at all there is true hateful racial sentiment* (plenty examples of that), but in my experience with white people who don't have exposure to minorities (most people in Vermont, for instance, ~97% white, not to mention specificially Christian western euro descendants so a generally narrow grouping), @Southern Kross's description of blue eyed blonde girl being innocence personified rings true, overwhelmingly it's just what they are familiar with. So even if they aren't especially racist in the sense of disliking minorities (in practice they act cordial enough when they meet *and* in private attitudes), they still have very narrow expectations of what that means. It's still racism, but I see those groups differently. The thing is, hateful racists are the ones who are going to announce their stuff to the world while the ingrained/unfamiliar variety are just going to be quietly surprised and confused.

    That probably doesn't mean anything in terms of how you see yourself or relate to a character at all, which I can see is an issue all its own, but I figured it was worth pointing out. The loud jerkoffs and the ingrained have similar base beliefs, but they are different in mentality, and their representation online seems heavily skewed toward the former.

    *The thing about the hateful racists when I meet them (this happens occasionally, including just last week) is that they seem to assume that it's a universal sentiment, by their nature. Universal, of course, meaning they see I'm a 'fellow white guy.' And figure because I'm a city person I must be acutely aware of how evil those dark people are, seeing them up close and all. "You're from DC?! There sure are a lot of black people up there!...I'd hate living in the city!" (this was seriously the first thing they said after they asked where I was from after maybe 1 minute of conversation) as if they're really expecting me to reply "Yeah it feels great to be away from that dark menace and with some real americans, high five." Genuine surprise I'm not hopping on that train with them.



    Quote Originally Posted by Risen View Post
    What's just funny, and twisted, is that you (and I) don't even get the luxury of just imagining such characters as being of our own ethnicity/race, if you live in this country. Everything is portrayed in such a one sided manner that you simply stop thinking of the stories from your own racial perspective. It's even more obvious when you go to other countries and see how they react to American media, and the stereotypes they build about America based on it. It's been getting a lot better in recent years though.
    Can you elaborate on the perceptions in other countries?
    Don't know how much it'll bend til it breaks.

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