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  1. #21
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Before I was a teen only gets me up to about 1980-1981.

    - Encyclopedia Brown
    - Hardy Boys / Nancy Drew
    - Susan Cooper (Dark is Rising)
    - Stephen Donaldson's Thomas Covenant series
    - Ursula leGuin's Earthsea
    - Madeleine L'Engle's wrinkle in Time
    - CS Lewis' Narnia
    - Tolkien's Hobbit + Lord of the Rings
    - The Great Brain series
    - James Blish's STTOS novelization of the episodes
    - Dr Seuss
    - Alvin Fernold books
    - various Caldecott winners
    - Mythology books
    - Dinosaur books
    - space/Astronomy books

    Those are some of the more central things, but I had gone through the entire kid's section of my public local library by fifth grade at the latest and was reading from the adult section.

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfy View Post
    Charlotte's Web springs to mind. And Choose your own adventure types of books.
    Yeah, good choices. I loved the latter, both the normal sort + the Ian Livingstone ones.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  2. #22
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    It's been a long time since I've read them, but they are kind of trippy. If I remember right, they are a combination of Arthurian legend, weird science, and teen angst. I found them pretty absorbing.
    I don't think there are any Arthurian things in the Wrinkle in Time series, you might be thinking Susan Cooper's "The Dark is Rising" series there (with The Grey King, etc., and set in England).

    L'Engle's Christian faith kind of plays out in the books, especially the first one, but they also blend in basic psychology/spirituality with a very NF flavor.

    A Wrinkle in Time has Meg tesseracting across the universe to save her father, and her 5-year-old genius brother Charles Wallace goes along and she ends up needing to save him too. There are three old women (Mrs. Whatsit, Mrs. Who, and Mrs. Which) who are far more than they seem. There are forces of light and darkness in the universe -- life vs emptiness/void -- and that's what Meg is fighting... that which steals life and individuality from people in the name of conformity and lifelessness.

    A Wind in the Door is the "next step" where Meg and Calvin are being taught how to be Teachers along with a cherubim, in order to save Charles Wallace's life.

    A Swiftly Tilting Planet leaps further ahead in the future, where Charles Wallace (now 15) trips through time with Gaudiour and goes Within people in order to change time back to what it should be, in order to prevent a world catastrophe. It's actually the most "normal" of the three, probably, in that different chapters are written as the character that Charles Wallace is within.

    There are a few other books she wrote that are attached to the same family, but those are the main three.

    I really love L'Engle as a person and writer (she was pretty profilic and wrote some journal-ly books too), she died in her late 80's probably within the last 7 years or so, I think. A Wind in the Door is an influence on a current project I'm working on.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  3. #23
    darkened dreams labyrinthine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    - Hardy Boys / Nancy Drew
    - CS Lewis' Narnia
    - Tolkien's Hobbit
    - space/Astronomy books
    I have these in common with you.
    I also read Heinlein and some other scifi
    Step into my metaphysical room of mirrors.
    Fear of reality creates myopic morality
    So I guess it means there is trouble until the robins come
    (from Blue Velvet)

  4. #24
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I didn't read these as a kid myself, but I'm currently reading Jenny and the Cat Club to my son and I think I love it more than he does. <3

  5. #25
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fia View Post
    I have these in common with you.
    I also read Heinlein and some other scifi
    I don't remember if I read Heinlein before I turned 13. I did read The Number of the Beast.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #26
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    I didn't read these as a kid myself, but I'm currently reading Jenny and the Cat Club to my son and I think I love it more than he does. <3
    I think I might have enjoyed A Series of Misfortunate Events more than my kids did, although they probably got more out of Captain Underpants (which I really liked, but they were very excited about him).
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  7. #27
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Some others: Alice in Wonderland (loved, read over and over and over- despite not really being a repeat reader otherwise)
    The Phantom Tollbooth
    Bridge to Terabithia
    Tuck Everlasting
    Sign of the Beaver
    Where the Red Fern Grows (ALL THE TEARS)

    I'm sure I'll think of more. Great thread!

  8. #28
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    Piers Anthony was a big thing amongst me and my friends.

    I really liked Jack London as well.

    Some Tolkien. Some C.S. Lewis.

    The mandatory Roald Dahl and Lewis Carroll.

    I tried 'A Wrinkle In Time', but couldn't get into it.

    I actually got pretty into these stupid X-files novels.

    A lot of science and encyclopedia-type books, too.

    I don't remember how old I was... 12? 13? When I got into dystopic/science fiction (Time Machine, War of the Worlds, 1984).

    I actually had a bit of a thing for historical fiction, come to think of it (American History stuff; don't remember names).

    Oh, and Michael Crichton and other movie stuff, like Jurassic Park, The Hot Zone, 12 Monkeys, etc.

    And then a bunch of crap that I tried out, but never really liked all that much: Goosebumps, Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, etc.

    Thanks for prompting that; that was actually kinda fun trying to wring that shit out of my brain.

  9. #29
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Some books I remember reading and loving, but I don't remember the titles or authors of:

    one about a girl who visits her cousins who live in a coal-mining town and they solve some kind of ghost mystery at the mine
    one about a brother and sister pair who spend a summer away from home, and they find some kind of abandoned town, and later find an old couple who still live there and befriend them
    one about some kids who find a note in their grandparents' attic that turns out to be the beginning of some kind of scavenger hunt their grandparents set up when they were much younger, it ends with them finding a key and unlocking family memorobilia or something- clearly I'm not remembering all of the details of this one but I remember being pretty fascinated with it for some time

  10. #30
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    I don't think there are any Arthurian things in the Wrinkle in Time series, you might be thinking Susan Cooper's "The Dark is Rising" series there (with The Grey King, etc., and set in England).
    I think you're right. Do not remember reading that at all, but apparently I did.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

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