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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AffirmitiveAnxiety View Post
    I just read Terry Pratchett, still do in fact, Terry Deary of Horrible Histories fame, bit of Enid Blighton and occasionally the Goosebumps series, but that wasn't a favourite.
    I think I was in my late teens to early twenties when I read Pratchett and actually think he's for older or adult readers really.

    The Goosebumps books were like the RL Stine Point Series, like point horror, point mystery etc. when I was a kid, anything which seemed either to be a "campaign" book, like for cultural reasons the government/school/library would really like you to read whatever, or commercial putsch, like we at the marketing division of publishing corp think you should really be into this hip, new, cool fad that all your friends will be reading, totally put me off. I know. It was prejudicial in my decision making and I probably missed out on some good reads as a result and experiences growing up that other people shared.

    It was a bit of a hipster thing to do too when I think about it but I thought I was really resistant to peer pressure and all sorts of things which were probably exaggerations too.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    We had a Commodore and subscribed to a magazine called Loadstar which was so freaking exciting to get every month. I have never had as much fun with a computer as I had reading and playing with Loadstar.
    We used to just buy the magazine, which meant that occasionally if they were in short supply you missed a month or had to share a copy with friends, the thing about commodore format is that it had such a following that long after the games system became defunct the fans kept it alive with subscriptions and wrote their own games for the cover cassette, the programming and coding sections sort of took over as the reviews, previews and gaming solutions sections dwindled.

    They had a cast of "characters" like "The Mighty Brain" which was supposed to be a sort of commodore related wiki idea, "roger frames", who bought budget games, and some writers who would do lists or top tens of everything, those sections were usually losely related to games but sometimes the most readable. I liked the pluses and minuses icons, "thrill meters", ratings out of five or ten and warnings, like is the game a multiload, seperate ratings for sound, graphics, gameplay, story, accompanying manuals or materials, they even talked about cost too back then, attacking games for having the audacity to charge fifty quid or more (seems quaint nearly now).

  3. #13
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    The majority of Madeleine L'Engle's fiction (A Wrinkle in Time especially), Avi, the Dear America series, the Charlie Bones series, some series about fairies, American Girl books, Patricia Reilly Giff, Nancy Drew, the Amelia series by Marissa Moss, and Margaret Peterson Haddix.

    There was also this book called Criss Cross by Lynne Rae Perkins, which is still one of my all-time favorite books. I'd probably hate it if I read it again, but it was perfect for where I was at the time, and I'd definitely recommend it to anyone in that age group.

  4. #14
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    I forgot about Madeline L'Engle! I LOVED those.

  5. #15
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I didn't really start reading for fun until I was ten or eleven and my teacher read us The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. So I read the Chronicles of Narnia and the Wrinkle in Time books and Encyclopedia Brown and Choose Your Own Adventures. I didn't grow up in a reading family so my access to books was a little limited.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by cafe View Post
    I didn't really start reading for fun until I was ten or eleven and my teacher read us The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. So I read the Chronicles of Narnia and the Wrinkle in Time books and Encyclopedia Brown and Choose Your Own Adventures. I didn't grow up in a reading family so my access to books was a little limited.
    What are the wrinkle in time books like? They've been recommended to me before and I've not read them yet.

  7. #17
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lark View Post
    What are the wrinkle in time books like? They've been recommended to me before and I've not read them yet.
    It's been a long time since I've read them, but they are kind of trippy. If I remember right, they are a combination of Arthurian legend, weird science, and teen angst. I found them pretty absorbing.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  8. #18
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    I was a voracious reader with a teacher for a mother, so I was fed a steady diet of books from the moment I first learned to read... most notably

    - nancy drew books... read at least 100 of them
    - those illustrated classics books that are abridged versions of classic literature... especially loved anything mark twain or about pirates (though I also read the real versions of tom sawyer and huckleberry finn before reaching my teens)
    - scary stories to tell in the dark and such... actually looked that series up the other day for nostalgia reasons
    - all of the american girls books that were out at the time... my aunt worked at a living history museum so I have an autographed copy of Meet Addy that I received before it was in the stores
    - dear america/little house on the prairie and other assorted historical fiction... my favorites being Caddie Woodlawn and Thimble Summer
    - any book on space that I could lay my hands on... I wanted to be an astronomer for a while
    - National Geographics- I blame them for my desire to travel everywhere!
    - the encyclopedias and dictionaries
    - fairy tales and other such stories

    and pretty much any other printed word I encountered... I had a nerdy streak as a kid
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  9. #19
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Oh man, how could I forget Little House? I was OBSESSED with those as soon as I could read. Before I could read, actually- my mom loved them and read them to me a lot. My mom loved reading aloud and read to us way past the point where we could read on our own, it was just special time with her.

  10. #20

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    Charlotte's Web springs to mind. And Choose your own adventure types of books.

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