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Thread: 1980s culture

  1. #51
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    BTW, what was up with fashion in the 1980s and early-1990s?
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  2. #52
    Member jungie's Avatar
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    I rember finding my mother's shoes from the 70's and laughing do hard at them I thought I was going to die. Then with an assurance of a 10 year old I said "No one will ever wear this type od stuff ever ever EVER again!!"
    I wish I could get those chunky platforms now - she wore the same size as I do now!!! Boo Hoo

    On the other hand when I was saying this, my 80s jeans were tight like second skin and I had pixie boots, a really bad mullet like -really BAD haircut (hey frizzy was in!!) and some parachute material neon pink jacket. And I was the hottest thing that walked the earth!! LOL

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by jungie View Post
    I rember finding my mother's shoes from the 70's and laughing do hard at them I thought I was going to die. Then with an assurance of a 10 year old I said "No one will ever wear this type od stuff ever ever EVER again!!"
    I wish I could get those chunky platforms now - she wore the same size as I do now!!! Boo Hoo

    On the other hand when I was saying this, my 80s jeans were tight like second skin and I had pixie boots, a really bad mullet like -really BAD haircut (hey frizzy was in!!) and some parachute material neon pink jacket. And I was the hottest thing that walked the earth!! LOL
    Wow. I wasn't conscious of fashion in the first eight years of my life, and that sounds. . . odd now. I like to go back in fashion history. I'm a fan of the Edwardian period and the 1920s for men's suits, and I also like the hats and other accessories of the 1950s and 1960s. I also dig the mod look for both men and women, which was itself a throwback, and the Teddy Boys.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  4. #54
    Senior Member aeon's Avatar
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    I think it is worth considering that pop cultural trends in music tend to run "late" relative to the numerical year, i.e., the 70s could be 1973-1982, the 80s could be 1983-1992, etc.

    I don't think or feel any decade is better or worse than any other in terms of having music I value as "good." I cartainly do value certain cultural movements - five of my favorites being British rock circa 1964-1970, the R'n'B/soul of 1966-1972, the New Wave of 1977-1983, the British indie of 1986-1992, and the electronic movement of 1991-1997.


    cheers,
    Ian

  5. #55
    Senior Member Lateralus's Avatar
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    How can anyone who dislike the decade that brought us break dancing?!?!

    YouTube - Break machine - street dance

    If you grew up in the 80s, you wanted to be able to dance like the guys in this video. Just admit it!

  6. #56
    veteran attention whore Jeffster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lateralus View Post
    How can anyone who dislike the decade that brought us break dancing?!?!

    YouTube - Break machine - street dance

    If you grew up in the 80s, you wanted to be able to dance like the guys in this video. Just admit it!
    I fully admit it. I sucked at break-dancing. I also wanted a cool, hip hairdo and my dad refused to allow it.
    Jeffster Illustrates the Artisan Temperament <---- click here

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  7. #57
    Resident Snot-Nose GZA's Avatar
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    Why is it relevant if the bands were commercially succesful? Maybe I'm biased, growing up in the 2000's where big hits are selling less and the market is spreading out into various modest niches, but I don't see why it should matter how succesful they were commercially.

    So a question... someone mentioned that after looking at 80's culture, its easy to see why grunge happened. So why did the 80's happen, looking at the 70's, and why did the 2000's happen, looking at the 90's.

    My theory for the 2000's at least is that the mass commercialization of music (i.e. boy bands, Spice Girls, Puff Daddy, ect) made the music go stale and made a lot of general culture become more underground and niche. Can't speak for other decades though.

    By the way, I think the best non-rap 80's music has to be MJ, Stevie Ray Vaughan (even though his stuff is really just a reconfiguration of Chicago Blues and Hendrix, and isn't representative of 80's music as a whole), and Tom Waits (once again not very 80's).

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by GZA View Post
    Why is it relevant if the bands were commercially succesful? Maybe I'm biased, growing up in the 2000's where big hits are selling less and the market is spreading out into various modest niches, but I don't see why it should matter how succesful they were commercially.

    So a question... someone mentioned that after looking at 80's culture, its easy to see why grunge happened. So why did the 80's happen, looking at the 70's, and why did the 2000's happen, looking at the 90's.

    My theory for the 2000's at least is that the mass commercialization of music (i.e. boy bands, Spice Girls, Puff Daddy, ect) made the music go stale and made a lot of general culture become more underground and niche. Can't speak for other decades though.

    By the way, I think the best non-rap 80's music has to be MJ, Stevie Ray Vaughan (even though his stuff is really just a reconfiguration of Chicago Blues and Hendrix, and isn't representative of 80's music as a whole), and Tom Waits (once again not very 80's).
    There was a ton of great British post-punk, goth, and indie in the 1980s.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

  9. #59
    homo-loving sonovagun anii's Avatar
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    These things seem to flow in 20-year cycles. Read all about it:

    - Cyclorama: The 20 Year Rule
    - CNN.com - 'Like, Omigod!' It's the return of the '80s - August 21, 2002

    My 2 favorite 80s relics:



    There's reason to be afraid, and reason to open your heart. ~ Seal

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  10. #60
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    The 80's had good animation series. Becames the start of the videogame industry and a revolution in music styles, specially in metal. Nowadays the people are seeking for the new ideals and observe the past as being an inspiration for the future, mixing all 60's, 70's, ... I call it evolution.

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