User Tag List

First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 38

Thread: D&D

  1. #11
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Some video game RPGs have the same problems too. Some developers might focus on making a game a simulator rather than a roleplaying game. Somehow they don't understand that those are completely different things.

  2. #12
    Ginkgo
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allegorystory View Post
    So my friends and I are starting to get into Dungeons and Dragons. We've bought books, dice and printed off character sheets.

    Just last night one friend and I sat down and created out characters. It took us 3 hours of pretty much straight working. We've yet to actually play a game, though.

    Anyway, wondering if anyone here plays D&D and, if you do, what kind of advice you can offer concerning making gameplay fun and interesting. I've heard it can either be a lot of fun or really dry and boring. I'd love for us to have the fun experience.

    And if you just want to use this thread to talk about how much you like/dislike/used to beat up on kids who played D&D, that's cool too.
    The fine point of D&D is that it's fluid and once you understand all the rules you need to know to play your game (character stats, DM preferences, campaign rules), you can let the game take shape in a form that, compared to video games or other board games, is very free-style. The other dimension of the game involves roleplaying. Using an accent to suite your character's dialogue, wearing something that's relevant, or sketching a picture of how you envision your character to be enhances the experience. Your DM might also give you experience points for doing so. The details of the game are a bit overwhelming (I would get the 3.5 rulebook since the player sheets will be more balanced and the classes available are more diverse that previous versions), but truck through it anyway. Nobody ever gained anything by not taking risks.

    Aside from that, have fun!

    ALSO! Don't invest in a single character too much. Chances are, you're going to get screwed in your first campaign. Imagine you're a surgeon; do your best, but be prepared to let go if you fuck up. Lol.

  3. #13
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Some video game RPGs have the same problems too. Some developers might focus on making a game a simulator rather than a roleplaying game. Somehow they don't understand that those are completely different things.
    True. It's like people who try to write stories who just want to basically describe how a bunch of stuff works realistically and have no idea how to engage and inspire an audience; most people don't play games as a similar hobby to reading their engine manuals and electric wiring schematics, they play games to have fun and create an experience together.

    The benefits of a computer game at least are that all that crappy number crunching is done instantaneously by computer -- which means you can have some pretty complex rules, but from the player's end it can still look pretty simple. For tabletop, the more simple the math and game system can be made, though, the better.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #14
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9 sp/sx
    Posts
    9,422

    Default

    I've always wanted to try D&D but never had friends with the same interest.

    I've enjoyed D&D based videogames though, like Arcanum, Temple of Elemental Evil, etc.
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gish View Post
    The fun all revolves around having an enthusiastic and adaptable dungeon master, which edition are you getting into?
    Edition 4. It was funny, when I was at the game store buying some books for it, the dude at the counter went on a tirade about how 4 is so much less fun than 3, but since he wasn't able to articulate any good reasons for why 3 was better, I stuck with edition 4. Dunno if I'll regret that but really, if I don't have anything to compare it to, I don't see what I'll be missing.

    Quote Originally Posted by UniqueMixture View Post
    I would suggest min/Max if you're interested in an easy fun game experience that let's you delve into the social/exploration aspect of the game more.
    What's min/max?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    The other game I'm in -- a long-term campaign -- is actually much better because the Game Master is far more interested in a collaborative effort with the players to tell the most interesting story possible, and he implements various rules and devices to encourage that. Yes, we do roll dice, but we don't get hung up on mechanics -- which IMO are just there to implement story. The entire game is focused on creating distinct and noteworthy characters and letting the characters drive the action and outcomes.
    Sounds like my kind of gameplay. I really don't want it to turn into a slog of rules and regulations and I don't get the sense that the friend who's going to be our DM wants to either. But I do recognize that a certain amount of rule-abiding is necessary for game flow and structure. Do you think there's such a thing as being too lax with the rules? I guess it all depends on who you play with. What have you, personally, found to be the ideal?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
    The fine point of D&D is that it's fluid and once you understand all the rules you need to know to play your game (character stats, DM preferences, campaign rules), you can let the game take shape in a form that, compared to video games or other board games, is very free-style. The other dimension of the game involves roleplaying. Using an accent to suite your character's dialogue, wearing something that's relevant, or sketching a picture of how you envision your character to be enhances the experience. Your DM might also give you experience points for doing so. The details of the game are a bit overwhelming (I would get the 3.5 rulebook since the player sheets will be more balanced and the classes available are more diverse that previous versions), but truck through it anyway. Nobody ever gained anything by not taking risks.

    Aside from that, have fun!

    ALSO! Don't invest in a single character too much. Chances are, you're going to get screwed in your first campaign. Imagine you're a surgeon; do your best, but be prepared to let go if you fuck up. Lol.
    Haha...good advice! How much would you say you typically delve into the roleplaying aspect? I love the idea of this part (already have an outfit picked out lol) but I'm not sure how much my friends are. I'm thinking of just going all out and have them see how much fun I'm having and then they'll want to, too. :p

    But yeah, I think a large part of why we've kind of stagnated in moving forward with actually playing is that a lot of us have become overwhelmed by the details. It's really just that one friend I made the characters with and I who are bothering at all to read the rulebooks. But I suppose we can always teach the others what we've learned. How did you first get into it? Did you read the rules with a bunch of friends and then just jump in together or did you start out with those more experienced and learned the most as you went along?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I've always wanted to try D&D but never had friends with the same interest.

    I've enjoyed D&D based videogames though, like Arcanum, Temple of Elemental Evil, etc.
    You should try meetup.com! I know they've got it for the Netherlands and I've seen more than a few listings for D&D groups in my city that freely take on less experienced players. Maybe they'll have something similar for where you live.


    Also! General question for everyone: what's a good number of people to have in a game, in your experience? I hear too few is nearly impossible and too many just gets boring. Is there a "sweet spot" of some kind?

  6. #16
    Senior Member acronach's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5 sx/sp
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allegorystory View Post
    It took us 3 hours of pretty much straight working. We've yet to actually play a game, though.
    been there, lol. Setup goes a lot faster if you have at least 1 really experienced person in your group, but then all the work gets dumped on them because they have to walk everyone else through every single thing about their characters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gish View Post
    The fun all revolves around having an enthusiastic and adaptable dungeon master, which edition are you getting into?
    agreement here

    Quote Originally Posted by Ism View Post
    Is it hard to get into? How addicting is it?

    I've always been curious, but I'd rather not waste the precious time I spend stalking this forum.
    hard to get into, but ya, addicting (kinda, depending on the people you're playing with)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    I've always wanted to try D&D but never had friends with the same interest.

    I've enjoyed D&D based videogames though, like Arcanum, Temple of Elemental Evil, etc.
    I imagine there's a forum or something online somewhere. Something like D&D it's impossible for an internet community that revolves around it not to exist. Finding it might be a challenge though, worst comes to worse, you could just settle for the RPG

    I'm not really that experienced, but i at least know the basics. A bunch of people got into it at camp 1 time. It was a 3-week camp that kept us really busy, took us a week to set up and play it like 3 times, then we all kinda forgot about it.
    Enneagram: Type 5, Dual Wing, SX/SP Instinct, Tritype 5-3w2-9w8
    MBTI: INTP

    Like a Baws

    Introverted (I) 57.14% Extroverted (E) 42.86%
    Intuitive (N) 63.16% Sensing (S) 36.84%
    Thinking (T) 70.37% Feeling (F) 29.63%
    Perceiving (P) 56.61% Judging (J) 43.39%

  7. #17
    Ginkgo
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allegorystory View Post

    Haha...good advice! How much would you say you typically delve into the roleplaying aspect? I love the idea of this part (already have an outfit picked out lol) but I'm not sure how much my friends are. I'm thinking of just going all out and have them see how much fun I'm having and then they'll want to, too. :p

    But yeah, I think a large part of why we've kind of stagnated in moving forward with actually playing is that a lot of us have become overwhelmed by the details. It's really just that one friend I made the characters with and I who are bothering at all to read the rulebooks. But I suppose we can always teach the others what we've learned. How did you first get into it? Did you read the rules with a bunch of friends and then just jump in together or did you start out with those more experienced and learned the most as you went along?


    I was introduced through friends who already knew how to play, 2 of whom had been playing for 3+ years. You can imagine that they were neck-deep in their ability to work out fantasy scenarios. I was very reckless and dropped into the game playing an evil cleric who was hacked to pieces by some random brawler after putting a homeless person to death just to take his shoes. Then I played as a bard (the infamous troll class), and brought my guitar to sing with a very... er... flamboyant tone. half-elf and all. Playing the bard was the most fun because I used cantrips to cheat at craps. Honestly, I had so much trouble easing in to the role-playing aspect because I would over-role-play; consequentially my friends thought I was of the chaotic evil alignment irl.

    Honestly, it's going to suck if you don't memorize your stats and character sheets. If I were you I would play multiple times a week. It's also a good drinking game if you're into that sort of thing.

    Holy shit, I want to play with you.

    Just read the basic know how of the rulebooks and then keep them on hand for further reference during the game. I wish you luck in Kalimdor or Runescape or wherever you guys... do shit. Lol.

  8. #18
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by acronach View Post
    been there, lol. Setup goes a lot faster if you have at least 1 really experienced person in your group, but then all the work gets dumped on them because they have to walk everyone else through every single thing about their characters.
    I think with the new editions, character setup takes the longest in the process but play isn't too bad. Not sure how D&D 4 is, but D&D 3.5, you're just getting your stat bonuses, skill point totals, etc. figured out. Once you get that done, all you're doing during play is rolling a d20 and adjusting it by your bonuses... and maybe rolling damage. Pretty basic stuff.

    I imagine there's a forum or something online somewhere. Something like D&D it's impossible for an internet community that revolves around it not to exist. Finding it might be a challenge though, worst comes to worse, you could just settle for the RPG
    There are various forums out there. And as someone else made the suggestion, I used Meetup.com to find my current gaming groups. It's helpful.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  9. #19
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    FREE
    Enneagram
    594 sx/sp
    Socionics
    LII Ne
    Posts
    42,333

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by allegorystory View Post
    Sounds like my kind of gameplay. I really don't want it to turn into a slog of rules and regulations and I don't get the sense that the friend who's going to be our DM wants to either. But I do recognize that a certain amount of rule-abiding is necessary for game flow and structure. Do you think there's such a thing as being too lax with the rules? I guess it all depends on who you play with. What have you, personally, found to be the ideal?
    It does depend on who you play with, you need people to agree on how "fuzzy" you're going to be with the system. Otherwise you get some players who just want to make things up as they go, vs the rules hounds who are really good at looking at a system and figurin out how to leverage the rules to get the maximum effect of the character they want to play. (This is pretty prevalent in MMOs too; knocking down some stats to maximize the stats your character relies on, having the right gear and skills and spell setups to hit the maximum possible impact of the stuff you want your character to be good at; etc.)

    Any type can work, if you can play by that particular agreement. I prefer a more medium approach; I'm decent with systems and knowing how to leverage the rules to do what I want, however I don't like to be dependent on the pure luck and pre-writing of the character, I value the talk around the table, interacting with other characters, making a cool dramatic story together. So typically, yeah, people need to still make rolls, but I think everything bogs down when the GM is checking for encumberance and getting really tedious with checking for EVERYTHING when you just want to walk down a hallway. The one game is pretty rational. The GM routinely asks you to make a Perception check, for example; and sometimes there might be details you'll miss but you won't know what they were; players will play within character and not search harder just because they missed a roll. Basically there's an underlying agreement that players won't abuse rolls out of character, and the GM won't make you roll for every little thing along the way.


    To help with characterization, my GM for the Redgate game (that's the city's name) I play had us all pick we don't really use alignment (although my character would be Chaotic Neutral, I think... never played that before). Instead, along with Traits (in the Pathfinder rulebook, which give bonuses based on character background), the GM told us to pick Aspects, which are traits of note about your character's personality. These Aspects typically will dominate in roleplaying exchanges, and when you play into an Aspect of your character, he rewards you with a Fate card. This is a deck of cards (purchased elsewhere) that has a general topic on it, plus an effect, plus four potential scenarios listed. You can then spent a Fate card at any point in the game, whenever you want to improve a die roll OR you want to insert one of the things on the card into gameplay.

    For example, I got a Schadenfreude card last session, with options on it to bring some kind of harm to someone else... like "It stops raining and the crops fail" or "Your opponent trips and falls in a hole" or other one-liners. I used it when I happened to perceive an alchemist who was stalking our group in some tunnels sneaking up with some fragile bottles in hand.... when I played the card, the alchemist of course fumbled the bottles he was carrying and ended up blowing part of himself up rather than us. ANother Fate card basically allowed us to make an NPC part of the ongoing storyline -- in our case, one grunt survived the zombie onslaught upon the town that we were caught in, and ended up being a local hero and moving up in the ranks. The experience left him a bit crazy from PTSD, but now he goes along with us and serves as an extra character of sorts, although the GM controls him.

    Aspects win you a Fate card because playing them realistically often leaves you at a disadvantage. For example, our bard is a Know-It-All... whenver there's a chance to learn something, even when inconvenient or dangerous, he still is tempted to get in there and figure it out... or when it would be best not to create conflict, he gets into a pissing match about whether he knows more than an NPC in their field of expertise. So when he plays into that, he gets a Fate card. One of my character's Aspects is Suspicious -- even when someone is being on the level and could be helpful to me, I will usually still be skeptical and wary of their motivations and might even respond in a way that sours them toward me. The Fate cards help balance things out and make the story more interesting because the players actually get the ability to change the plot of the story when playing the cards, rather than the GM being totally in charge. (The GM still decides what specifically happens, but is pretty fair about the outcomes.)


    Aspects also can come up during gameplay based on what happens, and the GM might say, "Hey, add this as an aspect," and you can either agree or not. For example, Jessa (my Witch -- it's a Pathfinder class) deals with hexes and focuses on mind spells as well. In one of her initial forays, when some hired guards tried to interfere with us, she hypnotized one with a skill roll so high that it broke his mind and left him shuddering and peeing his pants on the ground; he's never recuperated from the ordeal. She also got partly possessed by an evil dagger and did some pretty nasty things when interrogating prisoners with it; and her latest hex is Prehensile Hair -- no one in the party knew about it, but she had to use it in the last skirmish and wigged everyone out, grabbing enemies with her 10' long hair (the hex makes it grow) and throwing them around / throttling them with her hair. So I told the GM I was going to add "Creepy Vibe" to her as an aspect, which basically means if she plays into her ability to unsettle people, she'll get Fate cards. She really wigs out other people, including the party.

    You might not have the card deck, but the same kind of stuff can be built into the gameplay to encourage people to play character. That's all alignment was meant to do anyway. The more you play character, the less focus there is on die rolls and the more interactivity you get in the group.

    But yeah, I think a large part of why we've kind of stagnated in moving forward with actually playing is that a lot of us have become overwhelmed by the details. It's really just that one friend I made the characters with and I who are bothering at all to read the rulebooks. But I suppose we can always teach the others what we've learned. How did you first get into it? Did you read the rules with a bunch of friends and then just jump in together or did you start out with those more experienced and learned the most as you went along?
    I learned the system on my own, but I'm an INTP geek and am good with systems and learning the rules/frameworks of things. I think from what you describe, you need at least 1-2 people who are good with rules, to get the rest of you up to speed so you don't get bogged down. It's a pain searching hundreds of pages of rulebook trying to find one piece of information, although the index does help; also, if you can get the online PDFs, you can "search" on them and find things more quickly.

    Also! General question for everyone: what's a good number of people to have in a game, in your experience? I hear too few is nearly impossible and too many just gets boring. Is there a "sweet spot" of some kind?
    Typically, along with one Game Master, I'd say 4-6 is the best amount. Once you get past 6, people start butting into each other's business and turns take a long time to commence.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  10. #20
    The Iron Giant
    Guest

    Default

    I haven't played D&D since high school, but I had a lot of fun. I was pretty unpopular at school, but this was a large group (maybe 10-15 people, we usually had any eight of them together at a time) I was part of, and I was one of the youngest members. It was one of the few places I felt like I belonged. I had a handful of characters and played several of them at the same time. I would totally go back and do it again. I've played D&D computer games and they streamline all of the dice rolling and stuff, but there's something very satisfying about touching the paper and looking at the GM's eyes over a stand-up screen.

    I wasn't the DM, but one piece of advice I can offer is to be flexible and adaptable. If the players try something you don't expect, work with it. I think the general mindset may be that this is a fixed story with an ultimate goal, and that's fine, but if people wander out of bounds, don't kill them off immediately. Just go with it. One thing my GM did that was awesome was she created an arch-nemesis for us. I loved that this vampire was only very peripherally aware of us, it wasn't like he cared that we were around, if he even knew. It made him seem so powerful and unstoppable and mysterious. She also had unique voices for all the characters. Haha, I just remembered there was a senile old man in the game who kept showing up everywhere we went. He seemed to know everything, but would constantly forget what he was saying and doing so he was nearly useless. The voice she had for him was hilarious.

    As a player, all I can say is if you're hosting, make sure there's plenty to eat and drink. I ate a lot of sausage pizza and drank a lot of grape soda, and I still associate these things with D&D, though I'm not eating pork anymore, and I probably wouldn't like grape soda.

Similar Threads

  1. Applicant in AMP People's Choice for Nanoscience
    By Caterell in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-07-2012, 08:15 PM
  2. Keyboard Amp or PA Speakers
    By man in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-13-2009, 04:49 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO