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  1. #2101
    one way trip Abendrot's Avatar
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    Submission - Michel Houellebecq
    The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers - Paul Kennedy
    The Psychology of Courage: Research on an Ancient Virtue
    Notes from Underground - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    The mind is its own place and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven - John Milton

  2. #2102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Abendrot View Post
    Notes from Underground - Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    Do you like it? I heard it's very good and I love Dostoyewsky, but I couldn't find it in libraries nor book stores .
    “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes." A.C. Doyle



  3. #2103
    one way trip Abendrot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kas View Post
    Do you like it? I heard it's very good and I love Dostoyewsky, but I couldn't find it in libraries nor book stores .
    It's a lot of ennui and insufferable existential whining, and it reminds me a lot of Sartre's Nausea. To be fair, I doubt that it was meant to be enjoyable to read, being existentialist and all, but if I was going to read something promoting existentialism, I would much prefer to read Nietzsche. Maybe I'll change my mind by the time I finish it.
    The mind is its own place and in itself can make a heaven of hell, a hell of heaven - John Milton
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  4. #2104
    Senior Member Smilephantomhive's Avatar
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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe
    "Avoid getting too preoccupied thinking about what you’re going to do, to actually do it."
    — Rachel Wolchin

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  5. #2105
    deplorable basketcase Tellenbach's Avatar
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    Probably the most important book I've read this year; if the ideas from this book are implemented, they'd literally save hundreds of thousands of lives and hundreds of billions of dollars.

    Black Box Thinking by Matthew Syed:

    It turns out that many of the errors committed in hospitals (and in other areas of life) have particular trajectories, subtle but predictable patterns: what accident investigators call 'signatures'. With open reporting and honest evaluation, these errors could be spotted and reforms put in place to stop them from happening again, as happens in aviation. But all too often, they aren't.
    Everything we know in aviation, every rule in the rule book, every procedure we have, we know because someone somewhere died... We have purchased at great cost, lessons literally bought with blood that we have to preserve as institutional knowledge and pass on to succeeding generations. We cannot have the moral failure of forgetting these lessons and have to relearn them. Captain Chesley Sullenberger
    Basically, doctors make tons of mistakes (killing many millions of people) and don't learn from them because they aren't given feedback. Hospitals don't investigate for fear of liability and nurses don't point out mistakes for fear of ruining the reputation of doctors. It's like playing golf in the dark; you can practice all you want, but you won't improve because there is no feedback.
    "Do not attempt to count the number of moles on Morgan Freeman's face; it'll just frustrate you and distract from the film." me

  6. #2106
    Phoenix Flame cosmic royal's Avatar
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    The Awakening
    CHOOSE THE PATH THEY'LL NEVER TAKE

    5w4 8w9 4w3 sx/sp/so
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  7. #2107
    sinnamon roll lumi's Avatar
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    Annie Proulx's short story "Brokeback Mountain". I really like this author's style of prose - it's stark, almost matter-of-fact (not even a hint of wordiness or floweriness), but still highly descriptive and definitely one of those stories that draws the scene such a way that you feel like you're there. IMO this author is also a master of the "show, don't tell" method and is great at creating subtle layers in both themes and characters. To be honest, though, it's also kind of an emotionally exhausting read - it's just bleak as fuck, with pretty much no silver lining at all.


    “If you hate a person, you hate something in him that is part of yourself. What isn't part of ourselves doesn't disturb us.” - Hermann Hesse

  8. #2108

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tellenbach View Post
    Probably the most important book I've read this year; if the ideas from this book are implemented, they'd literally save hundreds of thousands of lives and hundreds of billions of dollars.

    Black Box Thinking by Matthew Syed:





    Basically, doctors make tons of mistakes (killing many millions of people) and don't learn from them because they aren't given feedback. Hospitals don't investigate for fear of liability and nurses don't point out mistakes for fear of ruining the reputation of doctors. It's like playing golf in the dark; you can practice all you want, but you won't improve because there is no feedback.
    I have that book and I like what I've read of it so far too, however, I dont feel its as simple as you make out and I'm not sure that the book is saying that, although I have not read it in its entirety.

    For instance in the UK there have been a number of attempts to move to very seriously evidence based practices in health and social services, each time that it appears to be getting some place it is scuppered, for a whole host of reasons, some of them political, a lot of them are to do with individuals and management culture too, if it appears that the evidence requires greater resource allocation when that is perceived as a failure or those resources are not available and managers do not want to ask for them, that's only one instance.

    I've seen how a lot of popular but poorly researched myths are recruited to support existing bad practice or managerial outlooks, like the ideas that you can only expect 8 years of good practice from anyone working in a particular role, which is very like the ideas about a "7yr itch" in relationships, meaning that after that time, a period roughly judged the required time allocation to bring a child into the world and for their to reach an age they may survive on their own, members of a monogamous couple will choose to stray or cheat on one another, the 8 year rule comes from about the same place evidence wise.

    There are a lot of variables besides the much vaunted "burn out" factor, such as the mounting frustrations of single individual with resource decisions, especially if this requires of them physically and psychologically taxing work practices which are not sustainable for a system let alone a single individual, and especially as you age or develop age and occupational illnesses.

    It results, when believed, in a high turn over of staff, either between departments or within the organisation itself, which results in the loss of learning and precious experience in the second paragraph you site but it can be an easy why for some managerial staff and senior managerial staff to deal with over taxed management, with grievances or the perception (which is often as important and much harder to shake) of grievances between staff and managers or simply that people are "tired of one another" or a manager is "tired" of a particular staff member, as ridiculous as that may sound I've witnessed the same being highly significant or become highly significant, especially when you ramp up the tension with other factors such as resource issues, staffing crisis or shortages.

    Also with a high turn over of staff, while you may lose the experienced or veteran staff who can problem solve in the reality of day to day operational and organisational shortcomings, you gain inexperienced staff who while they may not know how to cope as well will be unwilling to challenge problems as problems and comply with whatever they are told, sometimes working in the same unsustainable patterns which put the heads of the previous operational staff away and gave management a headache working with them.

    It doesnt fix the problem but it does make it appear to go away, for a time, while there's no reporting of it and when it does arise once more sufficient time will have elapse for a change in management, retirement and promotion opportunities come around and there are reshufflings of senior staff and the process repeats itself, possible a little worse each time and the entropy eventually threatens to cause the entire organisation to seize up.

    So the mendacity is possibly nothing to do with the power or prestige of Drs relative to other operational staff but resource allocative inefficiency, the airlines is an interesting case in point too because a lot of change in that air was only effected following litigation, some of it labour orientated some of it insurance orientated, which uncovered the over taxing of pilots and their insufficiency in rest periods and sleep deprivation. A similar issue existed there in which it was not seen as a resources but individual resourcefulness, no systemic failing so much as an individual one (often its a combination of the two), so individuals should have been dispensed with as spent, the human resources as akin to any other resources, such as batteries, pattern of thinking.

    Even if you remove all ethical questions of the human impact of operating such business models altogether, which I'm not a fan of particularly but I appreciate some of the "find fault with business last" camp will be a fan of, practically their sustainability is highly, highly dubious and they involve gross externalities too, producers, ie human resources, are also end produce consumers, harm them in one respect and you harm them in other too.

    Anyway, should've made that a blog post probably.

  9. #2109

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    Quote Originally Posted by lumi View Post
    Annie Proulx's short story "Brokeback Mountain". I really like this author's style of prose - it's stark, almost matter-of-fact (not even a hint of wordiness or floweriness), but still highly descriptive and definitely one of those stories that draws the scene such a way that you feel like you're there. IMO this author is also a master of the "show, don't tell" method and is great at creating subtle layers in both themes and characters. To be honest, though, it's also kind of an emotionally exhausting read - it's just bleak as fuck, with pretty much no silver lining at all.
    That sounds a little like Steinback, I've heard that some authors affect that style who are attempting to write in the fashion of "the great American novel", I've been thinking about it lately reading another book called American Pastoral by Philip Roth, I think that Orwell was trying to achieve something like it when he talked about plain prose novel writing but I'm not exactly sure as I read but I'm not a student of literary studies or anything like that.
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  10. #2110
    I wonder................. Cat Brainz's Avatar
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    Basically, doctors make tons of mistakes (killing many millions of people) and don't learn from them because they aren't given feedback. Hospitals don't investigate for fear of liability and nurses don't point out mistakes for fear of ruining the reputation of doctors. It's like playing golf in the dark; you can practice all you want, but you won't improve because there is no feedback.
    That is shocking. The book you are reading is possibly one of the biggest lifesavers in the world if it is true.

    By the way I am currently reading the Discworld series and Stephen King books.
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    you are brain in a jar in a cheshire cat wearing wonka's hat - Gentleman Jack

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