User Tag List

First 45678 Last

Results 51 to 60 of 74

  1. #51
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    To what extent is your appreciation intellectual, and to what extent is it a purely emotional response to a piece? Or rather, how do these aspects colour your appreciation?
    The process of getting to know a piece of more modern/late romantic music can be quite intellectually based, but once I remember the themes and follow along, pieces will hold emotional power for me. To reiterate it in a different way, getting familiar with new musical geography when the landscapes are complex takes intellect but once there is enough familiarity, the landscape can simply be enjoyed.

    I find it very easy to get to know classical era music, the process rewards me almost immediately, its a very stimulating intellectual task to get to know new pieces because its also pleasant to listen to though you have to be in just the right mood for it to invoke deep emotional responses.

  2. #52
    Member ultimawepun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    MBTI
    INTJ
    Enneagram
    1w2
    Socionics
    xNTj
    Posts
    92

    Default

    I apologize in advance for these geeky orchestral pieces.

    OreImo OP: Irony


    Suzumiya Haruhi no Gensou: Koi no Mikuru Densetsu


    Suzumiya Haruhi no Gensou: Itsumo no Fuukei ~ Gekiretsu de Kareinaru Hibi


    Nichijou OVA ED


    ------
    Final Fantasy XIII: Battle Theme (Never actually played the game yet, but this piece was just too beautiful to not be put here.)
    Last edited by ultimawepun; 09-18-2011 at 07:04 AM.

  3. #53
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    Aeon
    Enneagram
    10w so
    Socionics
    LOL
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    To what extent is your appreciation intellectual, and to what extent is it a purely emotional response to a piece? Or rather, how do these aspects colour your appreciation?
    Enjoyment of music for me is based on taste, rather than intellectual curiosity (in the analytical sense). I do sometimes like more complex music, I'm not sure if you'd consider that intellectual or not, but it is still the emotional response that pulls me in.

  4. #54
    meh Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,540

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Catbert View Post
    Enjoyment of music for me is based on taste, rather than intellectual curiosity (in the analytical sense). I do sometimes like more complex music, I'm not sure if you'd consider that intellectual or not, but it is still the emotional response that pulls me in.
    How do you evolve your "taste", or do you not consider that a worthwhile exercise?

    I suppose I was hoping the "appreciation" aspect of the thread might include some kind of analysis/exposition. Like you, I know what I like, but I don't really know why I like it and I usually don't "understand" it, other than as an sensory / emotional experience. I find a couple of things can happen when I dig deeper into the meaning/structure of a piece. One the one hand, I have a deeper appreciation of the technical virtuosity and artistry involved and feel more absorbed by the whole experience. On the other, I can find that a piece somehow loses its 'mystique' once deconstructed too far. Seeing individual notes is like seeing individual brushstrokes. It both enhances and degrades the experience. Any idea what I'm talking about?

    Quote Originally Posted by Medtnertunes View Post
    The process of getting to know a piece of more modern/late romantic music can be quite intellectually based, but once I remember the themes and follow along, pieces will hold emotional power for me. To reiterate it in a different way, getting familiar with new musical geography when the landscapes are complex takes intellect but once there is enough familiarity, the landscape can simply be enjoyed.

    I find it very easy to get to know classical era music, the process rewards me almost immediately, its a very stimulating intellectual task to get to know new pieces because its also pleasant to listen to though you have to be in just the right mood for it to invoke deep emotional responses.
    Hmm. It kind of works in reverse for me. I'm only really motivated to explore the "intellectual landscape" once I have had already established some kind of emotional connection to a work. Perhaps we're talking about different things...
    I like this idea of musical topology. I need to get some books on music theory. Does anyone have any recommendations?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  5. #55
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post

    Hmm. It kind of works in reverse for me. I'm only really motivated to explore the "intellectual landscape" once I have had already established some kind of emotional connection to a work. Perhaps we're talking about different things...
    I like this idea of musical topology. I need to get some books on music theory. Does anyone have any recommendations?
    Actually, i left out a step of my process. I usually have to give a piece repeated partial listenings before I have theme going through my head that makes me want to come back. Then comes the intellectual process of paying attention, then comes emotional. Its hard for me to describe so neatly.

    As for recommendations on music theory, I haven't read a book on theory either, I just listen, so no recommendations from my end.

  6. #56
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    Aeon
    Enneagram
    10w so
    Socionics
    LOL
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    How do you evolve your "taste", or do you not consider that a worthwhile exercise?
    By listening to music I am unfamiliar with. The music must still have some sort of "pull" though. I won't listen to certain avant garde pieces even if they happen to look virtuous on paper.

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    I suppose I was hoping the "appreciation" aspect of the thread might include some kind of analysis/exposition. Like you, I know what I like, but I don't really know why I like it and I usually don't "understand" it, other than as an sensory / emotional experience. I find a couple of things can happen when I dig deeper into the meaning/structure of a piece. One the one hand, I have a deeper appreciation of the technical virtuosity and artistry involved and feel more absorbed by the whole experience. On the other, I can find that a piece somehow loses its 'mystique' once deconstructed too far. Seeing individual notes is like seeing individual brushstrokes. It both enhances and degrades the experience. Any idea what I'm talking about?
    To me a "piece" of art is in itself incomplete. We are presented with some sort of final piece, but to me art shouldn't be disconnected from the process by which it is created. The feedback and shaping between the artists mind, the medium and any tools used (and ultimately the artists life) and secondly, how it is perceived (which in turn reflects our own lives).
    It doesn't matter how you deconstruct the process, art is about a chaotic combination of decisions/actions and you are never going to fully replicate that process merely by understanding art theory or reading a biography of the artist.
    In the case of music, the composition cannot be disconnected from the performance. Even if the performance is in your head (which requires some familiarity, even when sight reading).

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    Hmm. It kind of works in reverse for me. I'm only really motivated to explore the "intellectual landscape" once I have had already established some kind of emotional connection to a work.
    Which arguably could apply to any human endeavour..

    Quote Originally Posted by Salomé View Post
    Perhaps we're talking about different things...
    I like this idea of musical topology. I need to get some books on music theory. Does anyone have any recommendations?
    Traditional music theory is a bit on the uninteresting side, although you should still have a basic understanding of harmony and understand the reason for proper voice leading and counterpoint (to preserve tonality).

    There are a whole bunch of theorists who have tried to apply mathematical techniques to analyse music, but I don't care much for that.
    Art is a process and therefore (if you don't want to rely on mere inspiration) I believe it should be studied in terms of the creation process. Off the top of my head, David Cope is doing interesting things in this field.

    http://artsites.ucsc.edu/faculty/cope/biography.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Cope

  7. #57
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    MBTI
    Aeon
    Enneagram
    10w so
    Socionics
    LOL
    Posts
    1,366

    Default

    So a few months ago I decided that I was going to try to listen to all of Haydn's ~106 symphonies for the first time and to do so as quickly as possible (realistically, by the end of the year). I'm currently up to No. 34.

    Not sure which are the stand-outs yet, I'd probably have to listen to them more than once...

  8. #58
    Lay the coin on my tongue SilkRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,939

    Default

    I went last night to hear one of the best conductors in the world, Esa-Pekka Salonen, conducting the Brahms violin concerto (not sure of number etc, sorry...the really really famous one!), and Kullervo by Jean Sibelius.

    The latter is a symphonic choral poem, over an hour long. It's based on the Finnish mythological epic, the Kalevala. It was of particular interest to me because I'm half Finnish - although my Finnish is pretty bad, and there were subtitles over the stage, I was able to understand a very little bit of the singing even without looking at the subtitles (like "Kullervo, son of Kalervo, clad in blue stockings" ). Two excellent soloists and a hundred-strong male choir bellowing about a hero who accidentally seduces his own sister and then commits suicide. Pretty epic. Both it and the Brahms were spine-chilling.
    Female
    INFJ
    Enneagram 6w5 sp/sx


    I DOORSLAMMING

  9. #59
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    I was going to go to a concert last week featuring a 'taste' of the philharmonic orchestra's repertoire. It had everything from Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Dvorak to songs by Gershwin, The Beatles, Bernard Herrmann's suite from Psycho and John Williams' theme from Star Wars.

    Then I got sick and didn't feel up to it.

  10. #60
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    4,226

    Default

    In tribute to Herrmann, here's the opening credits to Hitchcock's North by Northwest. Herrmann's theme is allowed to play over the New York streetscape unaccompanied by the din of traffic and chatter of people.

    [YOUTUBE="jIlqatMQSgI"]North by Northwest[/YOUTUBE]

    (And yes, that's Hitchcock himself at the end as the poor schmo who missed his bus. )


    I didn't know that Bernard Herrmann got his start in Hollywood with Orson Welles and Citizen Kane until I saw the movie a few weeks ago. Herrmann had a close working relationship with Hitchcock (Marnie, The Birds, Psycho and Vertigo are among the movies they collaborated on), but they had a falling out during the production of Torn Curtain and reportedly scarcely spoke to each other ever again.

    Toward the end of his life Herrmann worked with François Truffaut, Brian De Palma and, in his final work, Martin Scorsese on Taxi Driver. Herrmann finished scoring Taxi Driver in December, 1975. Days later, Christmas Eve, he dropped dead. He was 64.

    He had five Oscar noms, including the one he won in 1941 for The Devil and Daniel Webster. His first two scores (Citizen Kane and The Devil and Daniel Webster) were nominated for Academy Awards; so were his last two (De Palma's Obsession, and Taxi Driver). His other nomination came for 1946's Anna and the King of Siam.

    Here's the opening theme from Taxi Driver (for which Herrmann was posthumously awarded by BAFTA in 1976):

    [YOUTUBE="b892Vm6Sw6Q"]Taxi Driver[/YOUTUBE]

    It's composed of bits and pieces of several excerpts from the score. The haunting bit at the start is from a song called "God's Lonely Man", the change at 0:24 is to "Thank God for the Rain", and at 0:43 it shifts to "Betsy's Theme", a leitmotif for the character played by a young (and very sexy) Cybill Shepherd.


    EDIT: *sigh* Why do I even try embedding videos...?

Similar Threads

  1. The folk music appreciation thread
    By Aleria in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 10-10-2017, 05:05 PM
  2. The PinkPiranha/LadyJaye appreciation thread
    By Giggly in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 110
    Last Post: 06-21-2009, 06:24 PM
  3. The booyalab/Edahn Appreciation thread
    By booyalab in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 10-21-2008, 04:53 PM
  4. The Nocapszy/Hmm Appreciation Thread.
    By Jack Flak in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 103
    Last Post: 10-20-2008, 07:45 PM
  5. The Tom Cruise Appreciation Thread
    By Jack Flak in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 10-17-2008, 08:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO