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  1. #1
    Symbolic Herald Vasilisa's Avatar
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    Default My Zombie, Myself: Why Modern Life Feels Rather Undead

    I posted this in vent and a few people liked it, so I thought it might be worth posting here.

    My Zombie, Myself: Why Modern Life Feels Rather Undead
    By CHUCK KLOSTERMAN
    December 3, 2010
    The New York Times

    Excerpt:

    ZOMBIES are a value stock. They are wordless and oozing and brain dead, but they’re an ever-expanding market with no glass ceiling. Zombies are a target-rich environment, literally and figuratively. The more you fill them with bullets, the more interesting they become. Roughly 5.3 million people watched the first episode of “The Walking Dead” on AMC, a stunning 83 percent more than the 2.9 million who watched the Season 4 premiere of “Mad Men.” This means there are at least 2.4 million cable-ready Americans who might prefer watching Christina Hendricks if she were an animated corpse.

    Statistically and aesthetically that dissonance seems perverse. But it probably shouldn’t. Mainstream interest in zombies has steadily risen over the past 40 years. Zombies are a commodity that has advanced slowly and without major evolution, much like the staggering creatures George Romero popularized in the 1968 film “Night of the Living Dead.” What makes that measured amplification curious is the inherent limitations of the zombie itself: You can’t add much depth to a creature who can’t talk, doesn’t think and whose only motive is the consumption of flesh. You can’t humanize a zombie, unless you make it less zombie-esque. There are slow zombies, and there are fast zombies— that’s pretty much the spectrum of zombie diversity. It’s not that zombies are changing to fit the world’s condition; it’s that the condition of the world seems more like a zombie offensive. Something about zombies is becoming more intriguing to us. And I think I know what that something is.

    Zombies are just so easy to kill.

    When we think critically about monsters, we tend to classify them as personifications of what we fear. Frankenstein’s monster illustrated our trepidation about untethered science; Godzilla was spawned from the fear of the atomic age; werewolves feed into an instinctual panic over predation and man’s detachment from nature. Vampires and zombies share an imbedded anxiety about disease. It’s easy to project a symbolic relationship between zombies and rabies (or zombies and the pitfalls of consumerism), just as it’s easy to project a symbolic relationship between vampirism and AIDS (or vampirism and the loss of purity). From a creative standpoint these fear projections are narrative linchpins; they turn creatures into ideas, and that’s the point.

    But what if the audience infers an entirely different metaphor?

    What if contemporary people are less interested in seeing depictions of their unconscious fears and more attracted to allegories of how their day-to-day existence feels? That would explain why so many people watched that first episode of “The Walking Dead”: They knew they would be able to relate to it.

    A lot of modern life is exactly like slaughtering zombies.

    IF THERE’S ONE THING we all understand about zombie killing, it’s that the act is uncomplicated: you blast one in the brain from point-blank range (preferably with a shotgun). That’s Step 1. Step 2 is doing the same thing to the next zombie that takes its place. Step 3 is identical to Step 2, and Step 4 isn’t any different from Step 3. Repeat this process until (a) you perish, or (b) you run out of zombies. That’s really the only viable strategy.

    Every zombie war is a war of attrition. It’s always a numbers game. And it’s more repetitive than complex. In other words, zombie killing is philosophically similar to reading and deleting 400 work e-mails on a Monday morning or filling out paperwork that only generates more paperwork, or following Twitter gossip out of obligation, or performing tedious tasks in which the only true risk is being consumed by the avalanche. The principal downside to any zombie attack is that the zombies will never stop coming; the principal downside to life is that you will be never be finished with whatever it is you do.

    The Internet reminds of us this every day.

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  2. #2
    Ghost Monkey Soul Vizconde's Avatar
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    This now makes me want a zombie as a friend

    I redact everything I have written or will write on this forum prior to, subsequent with and or after the fact of its writing. For entertainment purposes only and not to be taken seriously nor literally.

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilisa View Post

    Every zombie war is a war of attrition. It’s always a numbers game. And it’s more repetitive than complex. In other words, zombie killing is philosophically similar to reading and deleting 400 work e-mails on a Monday morning or filling out paperwork that only generates more paperwork, or following Twitter gossip out of obligation, or performing tedious tasks in which the only true risk is being consumed by the avalanche. The principal downside to any zombie attack is that the zombies will never stop coming; the principal downside to life is that you will be never be finished with whatever it is you do.

    The Internet reminds of us this every day.

    < read the rest of the story >
    I don't know about you but Zombie killing is fun, you can use a diverse amount of tactics to destroy zombies, such as using a hang grenade to kill a group of them, chopping their heads off with an axe/machete. You can snipe them from far away, or kill them close range with pistol or machine gun. You can even bait them into groups by throwing body parts in a ditch and tossing a grenade in.

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    Protocol Droid Athenian200's Avatar
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    Umm... personally, I have a totally different view of zombies than the typical Zombie killing movies. I tend to actually imagine people that are turned into Zombies, but then somehow regain their free will. I often relate to these characters.

    A good example would be this:

    http://www.wowwiki.com/Forsaken

  5. #5
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilisa View Post
    Every zombie war is a war of attrition. It’s always a numbers game. And it’s more repetitive than complex. In other words, zombie killing is philosophically similar to reading and deleting 400 work e-mails on a Monday morning or filling out paperwork that only generates more paperwork, or following Twitter gossip out of obligation, or performing tedious tasks in which the only true risk is being consumed by the avalanche.
    Since when? Zombie killing is both exciting and frightening, whereas email or twatter never is.

    Secondly, in terms of overwhelming amounts of information, tasks, or possibilities, this has always been the case. Technology has not changed this. Technology can only change our focus. If you participate in a zombie world, it is because you have chosen to do so.

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