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Thread: Chess

  1. #1
    Wannabe genius Splittet's Avatar
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    Default Chess

    As of late, I have gained considerable interest for chess. The reason is my obsession with genius, which has lead me to become a huge fan of Norwegian chess prodigy Magnus Carlsen (I am Norwegian).

    Anyhow, does anyone here play or watch chess? Are you any good? How would you characterize your style? Does it fit with your type? What types do you think would be best suited for chess? What do you think about the personality type of some of the leading chess players in the world?

    I am mostly into watching, but I am trying to improve my game. I am at a level where I beat people who just plays once in a while fairly easy. I feel like a quite positional player, but at the moment I am trying to improve my tactics, so that I among other things can become a more accomplished and creative attacker. Also it makes playing a lot more fun, because you see a lot more, and the chessboard comes alive. I am prone to blunders. I am best at playing rapid, but hate blitz, it’s going too fast, and I even lose to my inexperienced brother, which is very annoying! I have been practising a lot in ChessMaster 10, but I am trying to gain more experience against human opposition, because it’s quite different to play against.

    I think the INTP and INTJ types probably would be suited for chess, but it has quite a lot to do with intelligence. I don’t know about the whole N/S thing. Chess is often highly theoretical though, and pattern recognition is also very important. Positional play is a lot about playing by certain principles, which is a bit Ti in nature. The creativity most often lies in the tactics.

    As for famous chess players, I am pretty certain the mad Bobby Fischer was an INTJ. I think Magnus Carlsen is maybe a bit INTP-ish, but he could also be INTJ. Definitely IxTx, at least. I feel among other things, he is maybe too modest to be INTJ. :P Garry Kasparov is an E, I think, possibly ENTP.

  2. #2
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    I don't play that often so I don't have very much experience. I do have major problems that I'm trying to fix. I'm too aggressive and I move too quickly. You know, the kind of move where you finish it, and then you're like "Oh shit!" and they kill your queen. Yes, I move way too quickly. And I make simple mistakes that I know I could have avoided if I would have just looked at the position of the enemy bishop. I get an idea and before I know it, I've already made the move.

    I rock at improvising, but chess is not something you can improvise. Therefore, I suck at chess until I learn some self control. And this same problem applies to my whole life in many ways!

    And then I also wonder if playing chess is worth any time, and if I'd be better off to practice something else that would be more meaningful to me.

  3. #3
    Furry Critter with Claws Kiddo's Avatar
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    When I first learned as a kid I gave some adults a run for their money. I used to read books about it and play all the time online. But I completely lost interest after I discovered Texas Hold'em.

    As far as how I played, it was sort of a long term strategy thing. I would look for a weakness in how my opponent played and capitalize on that the next time I played them. Consequently, I hardly ever won the first game.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Sandy's Avatar
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    I enjoy playing chess -- my INTP son is much better at it than I am. He's always 4-5 steps ahead of me. (smarty-pants!)
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  5. #5
    On a mission Usehername's Avatar
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    my otherwise extremely intelligent INTP friend sucks at chess. i think it's because he overestimates the intelligence of his opponents, and expects them to make certain moves which he counters for, but they never do.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member ptgatsby's Avatar
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    I use to play, semi-competitively. Didn't like the required amount of memorisation of openings and such so I didn't continue to play competitively. It has been a long long time since I've played - I got stomped the last time I played against the computer, so I've fallen wayyy down. But if I do have time to play something, it's go and not chess.

  7. #7
    Glowy Goopy Goodness The_Liquid_Laser's Avatar
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    I don't really consider myself much of a chess player (I prefer games with a random element), but from my experience INTJ and ENTJ make the best chess players. I'm not really that good, but I can give most INTP's a run for their money (unless they are exceptionally practiced). NTJ's tend to smoke me fairly thoroughly. The best chess player I've known was an ENTJ. I'm pretty sure the Ni-Te combo is the best pairing for playing chess.
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  8. #8

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    I got into chess about a year and a half ago (so I am very much a beginner). It is fascinating. I actually went up to watch the Western States Chess Open in Reno, Nevada recently. (Yes--Just to watch. I may play the next one--my first tournament if I do play).

    I play mainly blitz (5 min. each side) chess with friends--Mainly with a retired couple who plays an awful lot. I don't like playing online. It doesn't have the same feel.

    It's an interesting pass-time in that you will often have 7 y.o's and 70 year olds with about the same skill level despite the 70 y.o. having considerably more chess knowledge.

    My main fascination with chess is how people improve at it. I don't have a lot of leisure time, but I am convinced there are strategies for improvement that are better than others. Thoughts on follow later.

    I play the same people over and over again, and it seems like there are certain people that used to beat me consistently that no longer beat me all the time. In fact, I tend to beat the retired lady more often than not now.

    Here is my take so far on how to improve the fast (as a beginner w/ little time to devote to improving).

    1) Tactics. When first learning, it is all about tactics. Forget openings, forget strategy, forget end-games, and whatever else. Small spacial advantages, having the two bishops, having better pawn structure, or even an extra passed pawn means little when you get mated through some combination. The most important types of tactics are, of-course, the mating techniques (because you win once done), but winning material is vital to keep from becoming a "mindless king-hunter"

    2) Very basic opening principles, to keep you from doing stupid things against slightly better players. Sticking with king pawn openings to start, controlling central squares, keeping up with development, slight awareness of good vs. bad bishops, etc. And of course, avoid traps and tricks by being aware of tactics.

    3) Learn the basic "overpowered" end-games. You need to be able to mate almost automatically with a K-R or K-Q vs. K. I would say K-B-B vs. K too. Learn the principles of pawn and rook-pawn end-games. And here again, there are a lot of pawn and rook pawn tactics to consider.

    4) Learn an anti-Sicilian. Seems like everyone wants to play the Sicilian, despite it having a huge opening book, and being immensely complicated. Its fun to pull out an anti-Sicilian and watch your opponent squirm (unless they really are Sicilian players, in which case you may be screwed). This is where you can practice your mating techniques against weaker players.

    5) This last part is speculative, since I've just started this. Choose a solid, positional openings to learn (since most players I meet will still have better tactical skills than me). I picked the Caro-Kann, and the Slav as black (and hopeful transpositions into these for other white openings), and Queen's Gambit as white. I haven't studied much, since I wanted to get burned a lot before I started delving into the books (besides chess is my leisure time, I don't want to spend too much of it studying).

    Anyway, taking up an ancient game for leisure is certainly fun, I got a bit carried away.

    Finally, to answer your questions.

    I am not very good (by my estimation) but I win against about 3/4 of my regular opponents more than half the time. The other 1/4 of my opponents (who I play a lot more often) beat me more than 70% of the time. I pretty much always beat the people who know the rules and play it like just another game, like checkers (IOW, I beat most people who are not into chess).

    Still, I would say that INTJs are the most naturally good at chess. But I would not be surprised if ISTPs are good at chess also, if they picked it up as something they would spend a lot of time doing (though I don't see too many SPs at the chess club, there are plenty at the coffee houses who like to play).

    Regular chess requires focus, concentration, and study. Imagination is a great asset at higher levels. But I would say that a lot of it is just straight-forward analysis (of the pattern recognition and calculation type).

    xNTPs, I think, would blunder too often, and would want to try their moves out on the board. But when playing competitively, these impulses can be temporarily put aside.
    Last edited by ygolo; 11-24-2007 at 10:01 PM. Reason: I like chess. I got carried away with this

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  9. #9

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    What openings do people play?

    What is your general initial game plan as black and as white? How has that changed as you learned more?

    I am curious to see if there is any connection between personality and chess style.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
    Robot Fusion
    "As our island of knowledge grows, so does the shore of our ignorance." John Wheeler
    "[A] scientist looking at nonscientific problems is just as dumb as the next guy." Richard Feynman
    "[P]etabytes of [] data is not the same thing as understanding emergent mechanisms and structures." Jim Crutchfield

  10. #10
    Wannabe genius Splittet's Avatar
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    Once upon a time I used to open with d4 as white, now I open with e4. Anyhow it's a more tactical opening, and tactics is the path to greatness, so that's what I need to study, not positional play.

    Against e4 I used to just play the Sicilian, playing the Najdorf variation, but lately I have adopted 1...g6 and 2...Bg7, which can be played against d4 also. It gives me a solid position, but I feel it's a bit easy to play against. Sicilian on the other hand is very sharp, so it's probably very good for my chess skills. Against d4 I just play Indian defence, preferably getting into a Nimzo-Indian or Queen's Indian. Perhaps I should try the King's Indian? I kind of love fianchettos.

    What is my plan? To win ... :P I just try to develop my pieces, be patient, make natural moves, and punish my opponent's mistakes. A more detailed plan depends on the position.

    All of this has changed since I have learned more. I used to play according to just some basic classical principles, but now I have memorized a few openings, and I basically know what I play against most openings. I now play the opening a lot faster.

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