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  1. #11
    Senior Member FeatheredFrenzy's Avatar
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    Here are excerpts from a longer article published today:


    Success, once it arrived, paled quickly for him. He told the editors of Saturday Review that he was “good and sick” of seeing his photograph on the dust jacket of “The Catcher in the Rye” and demanded that it be removed from subsequent editions. He ordered his agent to burn any fan mail.

    In the fall of 1953, Mr. Salinger befriended some local teenagers and allowed one of them to interview him for what he assumed would be an article on the high school page of a local paper, The Claremont (N.H.) Daily Eagle. The article appeared instead as a feature on the editorial page, and Mr. Salinger felt so betrayed that he broke off with the teenagers and built a six-and-a-half-foot fence around his property.

    As a young man, Mr. Salinger had a long, melancholy face and deep soulful eyes, but now, in the few photographs that surfaced, he looked gaunt and gray, like someone in an El Greco painting. He spent more time and energy avoiding the world, it was sometimes said, than most people do in embracing it, and his elusiveness only added to the mythology growing up around him.

    In 1984, the British literary critic Ian Hamilton approached Mr. Salinger with the notion of writing his biography. Not surprisingly, Mr. Salinger turned him down, saying he had “borne all the exploitation and loss of privacy I can possibly bear in a single lifetime.”

  2. #12

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    I was not a fan of his writing, but I was a big fan of his commitment to dropping off the face of the Earth when he didn't dig being famous. Props for that.
    Everybody have fun tonight. Everybody Wang Chung tonight.

    Johari
    /Nohari

  3. #13
    Senior Member FeatheredFrenzy's Avatar
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    I know, pretty appealing. He lived on a 90-acre hillside.

  4. #14
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcarius View Post
    Catcher in the Rye novelist JD Salinger dies at 91.




    Falcarius is kind of sad because Mr. Salinger wrote like what he and many other consider the story of their teens.
    So sad.
    Beppo Levitch would have made a good Holden.
    Unfortunately Holden and his brother where disillusioned with Hollywood.

    J.D. knew how to begin a story.
    There were some others who knew the trick. Malamud and .. Stevenson.
    Beppo was the best dr Jekyll ever!
    And he added the part of Stella to the story of Stevenson.
    It was a nice touch. So weird.
    Holden forgot there are also talented people in Hollywood. People like Beppo and Stella.
    A film is not a book.

  5. #15
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Holden could have learned alot from Beppo.

    I always thought Deano was there too. But apparently not.

    He'd have made the perfect Hyde - sauve, a ladykiller. A Stella-killer. While Beppo played the bumbling scientist, unable to get the girl, his better half smooches into her bedroom. The good doktor is never to blame.

    Holden never had a dark man like Deano to bounce off. Neither did Salinger.

  6. #16
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    Holden could have learned alot from Beppo.

    I always thought Deano was there too. But apparently not.

    He'd have made the perfect Hyde - sauve, a ladykiller. A Stella-killer. While Beppo played the bumbling scientist, unable to get the girl, his better half smooches into her bedroom. The good doktor is never to blame.

    Holden never had a dark man like Deano to bounce off. Neither did Salinger.
    You mean Crocetti?

    An all-Italian chap. Dino at school, Nino at home.
    He was one of the major characters in the original Godfather novel.

    Puzo was overuled and they wiped Nino out of the film.
    A pity.
    He was so sweet and suave. Or as they say in Italy, soave.

    Nino was a ladies' man. A buddy of Frankie.
    He knew the mobsters, too. He was not interested in the stealing business.
    A good singer.

    I expect he stole many wives and girlfriends, though.
    He was protected by Sam.
    Sam did many things. He tried to kill Fidel, but in the end he killed only Jack.
    The history of flying saucers is not exactly the history the magic bullet.

    Holden is Salinger.
    But it is another story.

  7. #17
    Senior Member matmos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    You mean Crocetti?

    An all-Italian chap. Dino at school, Nino at home.
    He was one of the major characters in the original Godfather novel.

    Puzo was overuled and they wiped Nino out of the film.
    A pity.
    He was so sweet and suave. Or as they say in Italy, soave.

    Nino was a ladies' man. A buddy of Frankie.
    He knew the mobsters, too. He was not interested in the stealing business.
    A good singer.

    I expect he stole many wives and girlfriends, though.
    He was protected by Sam.
    Sam did many things. He tried to kill Fidel, but in the end he killed only Jack.
    The history of flying saucers is not exactly the history the magic bullet.

    Holden is Salinger.
    But it is another story.
    That's the fellow, wilders.

    In may '90 & '98 I was on holiday in Spain; around Chrismas '84 & '95 the same place in Spain. In a castle when each one in turn died. I calculated the odds - and it's millions to one.

    Gottlieb died in '07. I was not in Spain; I was in Morocco, Joey never seemed one of the boys.

    Any attempt to appropriate Caulfield, Salinger met with legal action. Most artists accept that when the work is published it no longer belongs to them. Salinger seems to have a different view. Only by not publishing could he keep them to himself.

    You're right - J.D. was Holden.

    Would Holden be useful anywhere else? I think he would have made an interesting Hamlet?

  8. #18
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bananatrombones View Post
    That's the fellow, wilders.

    In may '90 & '98 I was on holiday in Spain; around Chrismas '84 & '95 the same place in Spain. In a castle when each one in turn died. I calculated the odds - and it's millions to one.

    Gottlieb died in '07. I was not in Spain; I was in Morocco, Joey never seemed one of the boys.

    Any attempt to appropriate Caulfield, Salinger met with legal action. Most artists accept that when the work is published it no longer belongs to them. Salinger seems to have a different view. Only by not publishing could he keep them to himself.

    You're right - J.D. was Holden.

    Would Holden be useful anywhere else? I think he would have made an interesting Hamlet?
    So Joey was the last one of the pack to die. He stayed away from the booze, I guess.
    I remember him from one of the films, when he goes to the telephone booth with a worried expression and receives bad news. The bank robbery failed.
    They all failed those days, the bank robberies.
    It was an era of morality.

    Kind of funny. One of the Hughes' girls had too big briests and there was an investigation into the matter. Very pious.

    Joey was not a bad actor. A little grey around the temples.
    Peter had his moments, too. He had a very good part in the Israel film of Preminger.

    A castle in Spain .. well, God has his little amusements.
    They are all now united with Him. They sing hymns, and sit upon the clouds.

    Life passes on. Soon we are all dead. New generations take our place.

    edit
    Look close at Holden's Manhattan. It is the NYC of the 30s.
    His Hamlet is a thing of the 60s.
    Incubation time.

  9. #19
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    how did they know he was missing?
    and to think i was so sure he and pynchon were shacked up together all this time!!!!
    "Develop interest in life as you see it...the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself." -- H. Miller
    -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --
    Johari the good..
    Nohari.. the bad, and the ugly

    I'm a FiNe SiTe to see!

  10. #20
    Order Now! pure_mercury's Avatar
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    Interesting fact: I first read The Catcher in the Rye when I was 9 years old.


    Bunch Of Phonies Mourn J.D. Salinger | The Onion - America's Finest News Source



    RIP. People should explore his catalog more, I feel.
    Who wants to try a bottle of merc's "Extroversion Olive Oil?"

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