User Tag List

View Poll Results: Ladies only: do you read romantic novels?

Voters
28. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes.

    5 17.86%
  • No.

    23 82.14%
First 1234 Last

Results 11 to 20 of 32

  1. #11
    Diabolical Kasper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Enneagram
    9w8 so/sx
    Posts
    11,544

    Default

    It's just a classier version of porn, right?

    Screw classy.

    Gimme fantasy and Si-Fi

  2. #12
    man-made neptunesnet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5&4 sx
    Socionics
    INFj
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Instead of being outright disgusted like most posters in this thread, I'm going to be mild sauce.

    You can thank me later.


    I don't typically read romance novels, but on occasion I will if I'm procrastinating. I'm not completely averse to it. I revise the plot to my liking and correct the grammar in my head as I go along, and that's more fun sometimes than just reading someone else's words and thoughts. Basically, it's just my subtle way of trashing the work while still being "constructive". It feeds my Te. Of course it's healthy SARCASM.

    Sometimes, if I'm around the right crowd, I'll re-read the "throbbing member" passages aloud and remind everyone to start making babies tonight as a cliffhanger.

    I'm not usually around the right crowd, though.




    I should probably be trying to compensate for semi-enjoying crap romance novels by citing other (more legitimate) works of fiction to salve any loss of dignity I may have lost in this post, but I refuse. Of course I read other stuff. Therefore, I don't have to go on a tangent about a ton of other books no one else cares about but me.

    I am a rebel.


    *Forgive the rant. I'm procrastinating at three o'clock in the morning. It's oodles of fun.

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    I also thought stuff like Tolstoy's Anna Karenina was really romantic when I was younger, and that doesn't really fall in either category.
    You're telling me you read Anna Karenina every time you're in the mood for a love story?

    Hello Tenacity.
    Last edited by neptunesnet; 01-08-2010 at 06:32 PM. Reason: Typo

  3. #13
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neptunesnet View Post


    You're telling me you read Anna Karenina every time you're in the mood for a love story?

    Hello Tenacity.
    I don't see what's so difficult about reading Tolstoy, honestly. Now if it were Dostoevsky...

    I'm a lit major. Reading literature is like second nature to me.

  4. #14
    Was E.laur Laurie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    7w6
    Socionics
    ENFp
    Posts
    6,075

    Default

    NO! (shut up, you)

  5. #15
    man-made neptunesnet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    5&4 sx
    Socionics
    INFj
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by marmalade.sunrise View Post
    I don't see what's so difficult about reading Tolstoy, honestly. Now if it were Dostoevsky...
    I've read Anna Karenina.

    It was very good, but God was it dense.

  6. #16
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    May 2009
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    6w7 sx
    Socionics
    SEE Fi
    Posts
    25,301

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by neptunesnet View Post
    I've read Anna Karenina.

    It was very good, but God was it dense.
    Well, it's considered to be 19th century Russian Realism, anyway, not Romanticism. Pushkin's Eugene Onegin is considered like the last work of Romanticism - it's much shorter, but it might make you want to hang yourself.

    I think Wuthering Heights is the best romantic story EVAR.

  7. #17
    The Destroyer Colors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Enneagram
    5x/o
    Posts
    1,271

    Default

    For the most part, no on all counts.

    I read a romance novel (like cheesy cover, title that explains whole premise) out of curiosity when I was in high school. But the insides are pretty much what you expect from the outsides. And the plot/characters/etc were incredibly thin and patently ridiculous.

    I'm also not a fan of romanticism in literature. I'll admit I haven't read too much of it, but for the most part, Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre have put me off of the idea.

    I do of course, read novels with characters falling in love and having relationships within them- but I have a really hard time reading any novels where the sole focus (especially conflict-wise) is on romantic relationships. I just can't relate to that, having lived fairly free of such dramas/conflicts.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    4,909

    Default

    Yes. It's not a regular reading material of mine, but, yeah, once in a while, I'll take a rec from a friend who's really into these books.

    When it comes to books, I don't discriminate, I give all genres a try. From light reading to heavy reads, everything piques my curiosity.

    Although, I must admit, these novels make for really fast readings as usually, I sometimes skip chunks of parts that seem to drone on and on.

    What I find most beneficial about romance novels, versus other genres of novels, like say, mystery novels or thrillers or whatever, with both being comparably equal "fluff" in their own right, i.e., quick light reading caliber ....

    is that, romance novels, esp. historical romances or romances in different settings, are sometimes quite helpful in how I acquire information about a new place, culture, practices, etc., quickly, efforlessly and in a light, fun way. I dunno, it seems like the romance novel authors go more indepth to set the stage, so to speak, in a rose-coloured way, and the visuals are flowy. "Romanticized"/charmed (positive spin, I guess).

    E.g., I still remember details about Cajun Culture and the Luisiana bayou, the way the homes are in the bayou (on stick legs), etc.; it was the fastest and easiest way I learned of the culture, through a light-read romance novel.

    More creative way of learning that reading books that are made for the specific purpose of educating on the culture, which can get a bit boring.

  9. #19
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    ENFP
    Enneagram
    9w1 sx/so
    Posts
    18,086

    Default

    never have...never even picked one up...wtf that's kinda weird...am i missin out?
    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  10. #20
    12 and a half weeks BerberElla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    2,726

    Default

    Not mills and boons, but some fantasy books are more romantic than others. Isn't twilight a romance novel? in that sense, I guess yes.

    I didn't read it for the romance part though, I just read it for the vamps and fantasy aspect.
    Echo - "So are you trying to say she is Evil"

    DeWitt - "Something far worse, she's an Idealist"

    Berb's Johari Berb's Nohari

Similar Threads

  1. [NF] NFP, how do you read?
    By briochick in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 46
    Last Post: 04-09-2010, 04:28 PM
  2. [MBTItm] What kind of people do you attract romantically?
    By Sizzling Berry in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 174
    Last Post: 12-16-2009, 10:53 PM
  3. [MBTItm] My Fellow NFers, What Personality Books Do You Read?
    By TopherRed in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 10-09-2009, 11:15 PM
  4. What blogs do you read?
    By wolfy in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 05-29-2009, 04:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO