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  1. #51
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    More importantly, I would suspect that what ever martial art the person making the argument specialized in, would be the one they would say is the hardest to learn.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post

    It's easy to get a basic level of understanding with stand up. It's harder to master muay thay in my opinion than it is BJJ.

    They are all hard for different reasons.
    Defiantly not true you can easily compare a roundhouse kick to a more advanced technique in jiu-jitsu like a flying triangle or arm bar that are just as hard to pull off. I found mauy thai classes to be more about conditioning and repetition there is a huge emphasis on cardio and strength, we would spend 20 minutes just on skipping. Jiu-jitsu classes have more of an emphasis on technique. With every art though you can spend days practicing one skill to get it "perfect" so it's still subjective as to what art takes "greater skill".

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by jixmixfix View Post
    Defiantly not true you can easily compare a roundhouse kick to a more advanced technique in jiu-jitsu like a flying triangle or arm bar that are just as hard to pull off. I found mauy thai classes to be more about conditioning and repetition there is a huge emphasis on cardio and strength, we would spend 20 minutes just on skipping. Jiu-jitsu classes have more of an emphasis on technique. With every art though you can spend days practicing one skill to get it "perfect" so it's still subjective as to what art takes "greater skill".
    You just proved my argument, cumulatively I would say it's equally difficult to reach a certain equivalent level of mastery in either.

    The cardio and strength training required for muay thai, balance the greater number of skills in BJJ.

  4. #54
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Both of those require me to get too close to people, for my liking. I don't want to be on the ground locked in with someone, and I don't want to get close enough for using elbows and knees either. That isn't to say I'm against them or anything. They're badass with the right people. I just mean where I think I'm natural at. Like, how do fight previously, before training? Some people like boxing, some wrestling, etc.. I don't study anything myself (although my main teacher growing up had a strong bent towards Aikido), but I'd say western kickboxing is more my thing. Emphasis on boxing. I think big kicks are best avoided too, unless someone is just standing there. I only say kickboxing because I like the option.

    Native muay thai is even more unappealing. My mom has a Thai sattelite that shows a lot of fights there. They're more like hockey slugfests. They just stand eye to eye and beat the shit out of each other. Who can take the most pain.

  5. #55
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiscoBiscuit View Post
    You should leave the thread, it's clearly not meant for you.
    It is meant for gamblers, I suppose? Now KDude here has something worth reading:

    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Both of those require me to get too close to people, for my liking. I don't want to be on the ground locked in with someone, and I don't want to get close enough for using elbows and knees either. That isn't to say I'm against them or anything. They're badass with the right people. I just mean where I think I'm natural at. Like, how do fight previously, before training? Some people like boxing, some wrestling, etc.. I don't study anything myself (although my main teacher growing up had a strong bent towards Aikido), but I'd say western kickboxing is more my thing. Emphasis on boxing. I think big kicks are best avoided too, unless someone is just standing there. I only say kickboxing because I like the option.
    I agree about the ground, but elbows are some of the best weapons, that and kicks to the knees.

    Some of the most effective techniques are the simplest, and the "best" style for a given person is the one that suits their body and their approach better. Even within a given style, not every technique or type of kick or strike works equally well for everyone. I was comparing notes with someone in the grappling group at my gym, and we had totally different responses to the same attacks, his based on getting the person on the ground as soon as possible, mine based on avoiding being taken to the ground. We also had a couple demonstrations from some Krav Maga folks that were strongly focused on exploiting people's reflexive responses in situations, e.g. someone trying to hit you over the head. Yet another way to look at the same situation.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  6. #56
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jixmixfix View Post
    Im a purple belt in BJJ ask away.
    True or false: I have heard that MMA fighters do not take blows to the face as well as traditional boxers (traditional, meaning, the kind that only use their hands with big gloves)?

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    True or false: I have heard that MMA fighters do not take blows to the face as well as traditional boxers (traditional, meaning, the kind that only use their hands with big gloves)?
    I don't understand the question are you saying they can't take as much of a hit compared to traditional boxers before getting knocked out? The thing is with MMA is that once you get knocked out the fight is over compared to boxing where there is a 10 second count to get back up. Also the impact of the punches are greater due to the tiny 6 oz gloves the MMA fighters wear.MMA fighters generally aren't as skilled as professional boxers when it comes to just using their hands but they are much more skilled in other areas such as wrestling, judo, sambo, bjj and muay thai.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    Both of those require me to get too close to people, for my liking. I don't want to be on the ground locked in with someone, and I don't want to get close enough for using elbows and knees either. That isn't to say I'm against them or anything. They're badass with the right people. I just mean where I think I'm natural at. Like, how do fight previously, before training? Some people like boxing, some wrestling, etc.. I don't study anything myself (although my main teacher growing up had a strong bent towards Aikido), but I'd say western kickboxing is more my thing. Emphasis on boxing. I think big kicks are best avoided too, unless someone is just standing there. I only say kickboxing because I like the option.

    Native muay thai is even more unappealing. My mom has a Thai sattelite that shows a lot of fights there. They're more like hockey slugfests. They just stand eye to eye and beat the shit out of each other. Who can take the most pain.
    You're saying you don't like close combat because it's not your style but the reality is close combat is needed to win a fight because the fight game goes to many areas not just toe to toe. In order to be a complete fighter you have to know how to clinch, how to throw knees, elbows, how to take somebody down, how to sprawl and defend a takedown, how to get back up from a takedown, submit someone on the ground, etc etc. You're not thinking much about the offensive aspects as fighting.

  9. #59
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jixmixfix View Post
    You're saying you don't like close combat because it's not your style but the reality is close combat is needed to win a fight because the fight game goes to many areas not just toe to toe. In order to be a complete fighter you have to know how to clinch, how to throw knees, elbows, how to take somebody down, how to sprawl and defend a takedown, how to get back up from a takedown, submit someone on the ground, etc etc. You're not thinking much about the offensive aspects as fighting.
    I'm sure that's all true in competition. I'm only talking about self defense. I know little about MMA. Everything you said might be crucial. I don't know. I'm just talking about how fighting comes natural to me, without any reference to it on the mat. I like moving around and hopefully, knock someone down if I can (Even better, bypass a fight completely and smash their head into a wall). As for getting close, I have some things that work to my advantage. I'm left handed, quick, and 6'5". If I find an opening for a knee strike, I'd do that, but I'd never define myself around it. Or rely on flying knee strikes, like many MT fighters do. Why would I need to? My body or posture can do other things. I don't need to close the gap that way. As far as any martial arts go, I always liked Bruce Lee's instruction to his students to only use what works for them. He urged them to not do things just because he did it or it fit a style. He wanted them to adapt to their own needs. He didn't give any belts or have any levels. He just told them to leave when they thought they could solve the problems specific to them, and come back if they had new ones.

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by KDude View Post
    I'm sure that's all true in competition. I'm only talking about self defense. I know little about MMA. Everything you said might be crucial. I don't know. I'm just talking about how fighting comes natural to me, without any reference to it on the mat. I like moving around and hopefully, knock someone down if I can (Even better, bypass a fight completely and smash their head into a wall). As for getting close, I have some things that work to my advantage. I'm left handed, quick, and 6'5". If I find an opening for a knee strike, I'd do that, but I'd never define myself around it. Or rely on flying knee strikes, like many MT fighters do. Why would I need to? My body or posture can do other things. I don't need to close the gap that way. As far as any martial arts go, I always liked Bruce Lee's instruction to his students to only use what works for them. He urged them to not do things just because he did it or it fit a style. He wanted them to adapt to their own needs. He didn't give any belts or have any levels. He just told them to leave when they thought they could solve the problems specific to them, and come back if they had new ones.
    No it's true in real in life fighting and not just competition the purpose of MMA is get to as close as possible to a real life fight that's why the boundaries and rules in MMA are small compared to fighting sports such as boxing, wrestling, and sambo. MMA combines all different martial arts to show which styles (hence the name mixed martial arts)to be effective and the truth is every style is needed to be a complete fighter, whether it's on the mat or on the street. MMA is always evolving as there are always techniques which are invented and used that are more effieicent and effective than other techniques. In order to fully train MMA you need be very familiar with arts that involve both striking and grapling. Some MMA fighters use karate as their striking background while others(most) use muay thai. Some use sambo or judo for their takdowns while others use Greco Roman wrestling. Pro MMA fighters also go to military training camps and train U.S troops how to fight properly in close combat.

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