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  1. #1
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Default Aesthetics, Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau: Vis. Art, Architecture, Material Culture

    This is a thread about eye candy/design inspiration from the Aesthetics/Arts and Crafts/Art Nouveau movements. As long as it's a visual representation of one of the styles, it's all good.

    Examples: CR Mackintosh furniture, slag glass lamps, Klimt friezes, World's Fair ephemera, etc.

    This is also a place to discuss any crafts, theories, practices and artists related to these styles. Ideas communicated by the art, patronage, craftsmanship vs. manufacturing, the bourgeois aesthetic vs. modernism, the role of 'modern style' architecture in the cultural development of cities, etc. are definitely relevant. Any vaguely related movements and artists/craftspeople/manufacturers as well as any modern adaptations of the styles are also welcome topics.

    I'll start with some of Gaudi's architecture:

    "For Gaudi, form did not follow structure and construction. It was identical
    with them."







  2. #2
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
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    Are you interested in just the European manifestations of the movements? I lately discovered the influence of Japanese woodblock prints on 19th century decorative arts. The prints were first discovered as packing material in the crates of imported china. There seems to be much to recommend them as an inspiration to a number of designers.
    In the States, the work of the german immigrant Herter Bros. of New York takes the aesthetic style to glorious heights in architectural interiors as well as furnishings...I'd love to post some example but I just can't figure out how to copy pictures into a post without having them come up as thumbnails....
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

  3. #3
    brainheart
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    I love Gaudi so much it's absurd.

    Japanese art was a huge influence of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Matisse as well.

    Cool stained glass from Frank LLoyd Wright:


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    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Are you interested in just the European manifestations of the movements? I lately discovered the influence of Japanese woodblock prints on 19th century decorative arts. The prints were first discovered as packing material in the crates of imported china. There seems to be much to recommend them as an inspiration to a number of designers.
    In the States, the work of the german immigrant Herter Bros. of New York takes the aesthetic style to glorious heights in architectural interiors as well as furnishings...I'd love to post some example but I just can't figure out how to copy pictures into a post without having them come up as thumbnails....
    Everything remotely related is relevant. I'm eager to learn more. The Japanese influence on European aestheticism is most definitely interesting to me, though I admit I know little about Edo and Meiji period arts in and of themselves. I understand that the opening of Japan caused some changes in the Japanese aesthetic and production of art, but I don't know anything specific.

    I love the Anglo-Japanese textiles and porcelain of the 19th century.

    Transferware was used in the 18th century and Chinoiserie. Of course, Chinoiserie remained highly popular, as did the (especially blue and white) porcelain often associated with it. It was later used in conjunction with Japanese motifs following the opening of Japan to the West and the interest in its culture and aesthetic that followed remember Whistler's fascination with and cooptation of Japanese styles. (Also Van Gogh, Gauguin and Matisse as brainheart mentioned, along with countless others). I remember reading somewhere that the asymmetry of a lot of the display plates of the Victorians demonstrated a break from stuffy formality.

    Some Victorian transferware and other Japanesque porcelain.






    Also, the textiles and home decor of the 19th century increasingly reflected the burgeoning interest in Japan. The Anglo-Japanese woodblock style heavily influenced the aesthetic movement.






    William Morris's trellises spring to my mind, especially:




    I'm not familiar with the Herter Brothers. I'd love to know/see more. You can click 'Go Advanced' when you reply and click on the yellow icon with the mountain above the box where you place your text. A window will pop open and you can copy and paste the URL in it. Presto! You can share pics.

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    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainheart View Post
    I love Gaudi so much it's absurd.

    Japanese art was a huge influence of Van Gogh, Gauguin, Matisse as well.

    Cool stained glass from Frank LLoyd Wright:

    Hmmm. I was also thinking about this image and it reminds me of a Mackintosh Rose motif (see below examples of C.R. Mackintosh roses). I did some searching and found that this was listed as Frank Lloyd Wright's on one website via google images, but IS in fact listed as a CR Mackintosh on other sites:

    Invite First Draft | Weddingbee
    Mackintosh Attractions in Glasgow | Venere Travel Blog
    also on flickr: http://farm1.static.flickr.com/104/3...4142105a08.jpg
    Cannon | MacInnes :: House for an Art Lover (C R Mackintosh)

    Wright's glass is much more geometric and less organic than most of that of Mackintosh. Sorry. I'm not trying to be nitpicky...

    Mackintosh Rose motifs in windows:




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    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
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    Well, while I try to find a decent photo of Herter's japanese influenced pieces here is a very interesting evaluation of design process...

    Geometry of a Herter Brothers Cabinet
    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings...Steal a little and they throw you in jail, steal a lot and they make you a king

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    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Well, while I try to find a decent photo of Herter's japanese influenced pieces here is a very interesting evaluation of design process...

    Geometry of a Herter Brothers Cabinet
    This is a great link. Sometimes the geometric balance (or 'Greek definition of "symmetry"') of a composition or piece is lost on me except in theory. This helps a sensotard like me visualize the division of space.

    Thank you.

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    Sugar Hiccup OrangeAppled's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jane View Post
    The Japanese influence on European aestheticism is most definitely interesting to me
    Me too...I absolutely love the mix. Art Nouveau is one of my favorite periods/styles.

    Of course, Beardsley is cool:

    Often a star was waiting for you to notice it. A wave rolled toward you out of the distant past, or as you walked under an open window, a violin yielded itself to your hearing. All this was mission. But could you accomplish it? (Rilke)

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    Senior Member sofmarhof's Avatar
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    If you like this you might like the book Retro: The Culture of Revival, which describes the revival of Art Nouveau and Art Deco in the 50s/60s/70s. Interesting fact: nobody called it Art Deco until the second time it came around. There's some interesting info on Beardsley.

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    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeAppled View Post
    Me too...I absolutely love the mix. Art Nouveau is one of my favorite periods/styles.

    Of course, Beardsley is cool:

    Hmmm, this is an Edmund Dulac print (he was another illustrater that was roughly contemporary). It is from a Hans Christian Andersen tale, The Snow Queen. See links below.

    Gerda and the Reindeer
    Vault Catalog | UBC Library Vault
    Gerda and the Reindeer : Edmund Dulac art print

    Beardsley was known for his often monochromatic block prints, which you would probably recognize right away: they are commonly seen on posters, post cards and even coffee mugs today. Here are some below:





    If you like this you might like the book Retro: The Culture of Revival, which describes the revival of Art Nouveau and Art Deco in the 50s/60s/70s. Interesting fact: nobody called it Art Deco until the second time it came around. There's some interesting info on Beardsley.
    I'll have to check this out. I knew about the anachronism of the 'Art Deco' designation, but don't know how it came about. I'm curious about the revival; I'm not terribly familiar with it, admittedly. Thanks.

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