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  1. #41
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr.awesome View Post
    is this from the film "When A Stranger Calls"?

    edit: 69th post. giggity.
    Giggity indeed. I'm jealous.

    I looked it up, and apparently the house for 2006's "When A Stranger Calls" was a set.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hirsch63 View Post
    Thanks for the info! This settee is perhaps my favorite Huntzinger composition. The alternating rythm of the spheres in the base tie into the turned rings of the crest rail together implying a series of triangles superimposed upon the form. Indeed, the dispersal of cirlcular elements throughout some receding and some advancing keep the contemplation of this work a lively exercise. The choice of caning in the seat and back lighten what would have otherwise been a heavy appearance despite the careful proportioning. I find the outward curvilinear thrust of the arm rests to be a joyful counterpoint to the otherwise rectangular emphasis of the form. The conic terminals of the back provide a beautiful note of punctuation to the as the composition moves vertically to a close. Thanks again for a great piece!
    You're welcome. Thank you for providing insight into the compositional elements - your input as a craftsman is always enlightening. I agree that the use of caning to balance the piece was a particularly astute choice, especially when you compare the final product to the bulky and inelegant design of contemporary Victorian setees. I hadn't noticed the implied triangle motif, admittedly, but I did love the rings as well. The repitition creates a rhythm that doesn't allow the eye to really rest, but the composition is not overwhelmingly ornate or imposingly substantial either. A very nice combination.

    I read a piece about Hunzinger that described his "inconsistency" in this regard. He had to appeal to the tastes of the consumers to whom he pandered (he was intent on building up a commercial empire), so he made some less than refined pieces along the way, but he developed an aesthetic in the process that was very, well, modern: balanced, elemental and harmonious. Some of his more baroque compositions appeal to me, but it is clear they weren't his most refined.

    If you have any other favorite designs, don't hesitate to post or send me searching for them. It's a privilege to have your contributions.
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  2. #42
    Junior Member Lex87's Avatar
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    I LOVE William Morris wallpaper from this period! Do you know if he took any of his inspiration from Chinese or Japanese art? I love the beautiful subdued colors that he used!
    chinese crafts rule!
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  3. #43
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lex87 View Post
    I LOVE William Morris wallpaper from this period! Do you know if he took any of his inspiration from Chinese or Japanese art? I love the beautiful subdued colors that he used!
    He did indeed. In the previous post, there's a little info about how Aestheticists (and later Arts and Crafts artists) compared Japanese craftsmen to the ones of the European middle ages, whom they venerated for their unique pieces and dedication to standards of excellence. Consider that, at the time, mass manufacturing and standardization had usurped the ways of producing household goods from eras past. The analogy was invoked a lot by British Aestheticists like Morris and Godwin in particular.

    Here's a great quote from Morris, though note how criticial he is of his contemporaries who imitate Japanese crafts (even though he borrowed from the aesthetic) without having the necessary skill to execute them.

    "For such an art nothing patchy or scrappy, or half-starved, should be done: there is no excuse for doing anything which is not strikingly beautiful; and that more especially as the exuberance of beauty of the work of the East and of Medieval Europe, and even of the time of the Renaissance, is at hand to reproach us. It may be well here to warn those occupied in Embroidery against the feeble imitations of Japanese art which are so disastrously common amongst us. The Japanese are admirable naturalists, wonderfully skilful draughtsmen, deft beyond all others in mere execution of whatever they take in hand; and also great masters of style within certain narrow limitations."
    He produced many ornate, flat natural motifs in the style of medieval tapestries and Japanese prints and textiles.







    Some art historians argue that Morris, in turn, stimulated the Japanese Mingei art of the 1920s and 1930s, which focused on folk craftsmanship, the connection between the artist and the final product and the reappropriation of Occidental "Orientalism".

    Mingei Art by Kawai Kanjir?



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  4. #44
    Junior Member Lex87's Avatar
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    Thank you kindly for the info!!! I find this all really interesting. I used to work in wallpaper store (it was my first job) Oddly enough, I found it really had a big impact on my interest in art.

    Thanks Again

  5. #45
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    1882 Renovation of the White House and the Aesthetic Orientalism of Louis C. Tiffany and Candace Wheeler: In 1882, Louis Comfort Tiffany and Candace Wheeler collaborated in the renovation of the White House, transforming its traditional Victorian interiors to reflect the increasingly popular aesthetic emphasis on period revival and 'reform' design elements. Louis C. Tiffany and Candace Wheeler were also two American proponents of Japonisme (and orientalism in general) in interior design.

    The use of flat, repetitive geometric and natural motifs, including on the Asian dividing screen seen in the 'After' lithograph below, reflects Tiffany's and Wheeler's aesthetic influences. While Neo-Grec is probably a fitting description of much of the Red Room's style, especially by the 1890s, the makeover seems like a natural segue into LC Tiffany's and Wheeler's Asian (and especially Japonesque) Aesthetic inspirations, which is covered toward the end of the post.

    Neo-Grec/Greek Revival (and possibly Renaissance revival w/ some Egyptian motifs, as was common) influences mark the renovated room. The mantle tiles, amphorae (though they were replacements chosen by Arthur in place of the earlier Japanese vases that Tiffany installed) and fluted/columnal details on the mantle reflect common elements of revival and reform styles of the mid to late Victorian era. However note that, by 1893, tweeks to the original design (including a new table) changed the overall look of the room; Tiffany's Japanesque elements (vases and screen) disappeared within a decade of the renovation.

    White House Red Room Before and After the Renovation:

    Before ~ 1870:

    Earliest Post-Reno View (After Tiffany's Original Renovation):

    After Tweeks ~ 1887 and 1893:




    Neo-Grec Decor reflecting Tiffany's mantle and Surface Treatments:



    An Aside:

    • Even though Japanese motifs adopted by Aesthetic Movement artists were generally naturalistic, it is interesting to note that similar geometric motifs to those in the renovated Red Room were found in Japanese Yosegi, a popular form of marquetry in the Edo period. Example below:

    • Edo Kimonos with multi-tone geometric motifs are also below.






    Louis Comfort Tiffany:
    The son of the Tiffany Co. founder, Louis inherited his father's flair for beautiful craftsmanship, but translated it from jewelry to glass. In addition to establishing Tiffany's stained glass legacy, Louis was a proponent of the Aesthetic and art Nouveau movements as well as the Orientalism that accompanied them. He designed interiors with lavish Neo-Grec, Medieval, Islamic/arabesque, Byzantine, and to a lesser extent East Asian, themes. For example: Laurelton Hall, George Kemp's Salon and The Seventh Regiment Armory. He introduced oriental themes and motifs into his glasswork, including many lotuses, Japanesque landscapes and peacocks. For more than shown below, you can Google and easily find many examples of his glass. You'll also find that his glassware vases also have the same elements of Japonisme found in some Arts and Crafts pottery.

    Japanesque Glass by Louis Tiffany:






    • For comparison, Japanese Wisteria as captured in Edo and Meiji periods:






    Example of Tiffany's Japanesque Interiors: (Louis even made his personal library in a Japonesque style, though I'm not able to find a good pic.)




    Candace Wheeler:

    Candace Wheeler was a textile artist who studied the patterns on kimonos to find inspiration for her designs. She wrote an extensive amount of advice concerning the principles of interior decorating, emphasizing the new principles ushered in by the Aesthetics movement in the US, including the cultivation of an artistic sensibility in the domestic setting. She advised middle class American women: "we have come into a period which desires beauty." However, this was a beauty that was distinct from the palaces of Europe, which didn't necessarily embody the more 'authentic' (though more modest) modern aesthetic that was emerging in the US. Wheeler unquestioningly favored the latter.

    Wheeler felt that Japanese art reflected this modern aesthetic, with its "harmony of coloring and exquisite craftsmanship" as well as its relative aesthetic purity. Unlike the baroque designs of the earlier Victorian period or the extravagant designs of aristocratic European palaces, Japanese design fostered neither "a profusion of costly or incongruous things" nor "false standards of display".






    • For comparison, Edo period embroidered Kimonos:



    Last edited by BlueSprout; 02-22-2010 at 06:09 PM.
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  6. #46
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    R.J. Horner, American Orientalist Aesthetic-style Furniture and "Japanese" "Bamboo"

    RJ Horner began manufacturing furniture in the mid 1880s and he and his son ran the New York-based RJ Horner furnishing company for about 30 years, producing many examples of "First Class and Medium Quality furniture". Horner capitalized on Japanese craze by crafting faux bamboo Aesthetic-style furniture for bourgeois consumption. However, unlike the original British proponents of Aestheticism or American Arts and Crafts Movement craftsmen (whose finer products reached relatively few households), and more like Hunzinger, Horner blended the increasingly diverse aesthetic demands of the middle class with a business model based on mass advertisement and production.

    Faux (and real) bamboo had been used in European furniture for a century before Horner manufactured it. It was particularly popular in Regency era Chinoiserie furniture, when it was typically crafted from beech. It had originally been associated with all things Chinese, which waxed and waned in popularity in the 18th and early 19th centuries.

    However, it became particularly popular toward the end of the 19th century with the boom in fascination with the Japanese aesthetic. Though the Japanese typically did not use bamboo for larger items like furnishings, furniture made from "bamboo" at the time was billed as Japanese in style because of the boom in consumer demand for all things Japanese. Even firms that did not embrace the 'Japanese' 'bamboo' construction to the degree that Horner did incorporated selective knotting details in their furniture to imitate bamboo's texture.

    Horner prefered to craft his faux bamboo aesthetic furniture from bird's eye maple. From RJ Horner Page on the Rare Victorian site:

    Throughout the 1890s, R.J. Horner advertised imitation bamboo furniture made of Maple stained a yellowish tone. This furniture was inspired by the great success of the Japanese display at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia. Surviving examples suggest that this less formal furniture was used in private living areas and not the more formal public areas of the home.

    Examples of Horner's Faux Bamboo Furniture:








    Hunzinger's Faux Bamboo Furniture:

    * See previous page for Hunzinger background info.


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  7. #47
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Okay.... just some Art Nouveau and Art Deco Egyptian inspired jewelry for pretties....

    Art Nouveau:





    Art Deco:




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  8. #48
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Art Deco Enamel and Semi-Precious Stone Jewelry for more pretties....






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  9. #49
    Senior Member Parrish's Avatar
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    Wow, those kimonos are beautiful!

    (the edo period embroided ones)
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