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  1. #31
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    This thread is simply delicious.

  2. #32
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    René Lalique

    One of the premier French Art Nouveau and Art Deco jewelers and designers, Lalique was heavily influenced by Japonisme. In France, the Japanese aesthetic offered artists and craftsmen a fresh approach to their work and an answer to the entrenched and stale tradition of academic art. Like Émile Gallé (previous post), Lalique found inspiration in nature, adopting organic and sometimes asymmetrical designs. He drew from Japanese aesthetic traditions, from wood block prints to hair combs, to craft glass, ceramics and jewelry.

    Hair Combs and Tiaras:





    Perfume Bottles:







    Vases and Sculptures:






    Last edited by BlueSprout; 01-17-2010 at 11:31 PM.
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  3. #33
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSprout View Post
    Hmmm, this is an Edmund Dulac print (he was another illustrater that was roughly contemporary). It is from a Hans Christian Andersen tale, The Snow Queen. See links below.

    Gerda and the Reindeer
    Vault Catalog | UBC Library Vault
    Gerda and the Reindeer : Edmund Dulac art print

    Beardsley was known for his often monochromatic block prints, which you would probably recognize right away: they are commonly seen on posters, post cards and even coffee mugs today. Here are some below:







    I'll have to check this out. I knew about the anachronism of the 'Art Deco' designation, but don't know how it came about. I'm curious about the revival; I'm not terribly familiar with it, admittedly. Thanks.
    lovin this thread so far.... and my sister was named after aubrey beardsley!! he's pretty cool.
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  4. #34
    mod love baby... Lady_X's Avatar
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    does this fit in this thread?




    Arthur Erickson, Architect
    MidCentury Architecture alerts us to architect Arthur Erickson who has done some amazing things with wood for residences in the Pacific Northwest.

    There can’t be any large-scale revolution until there’s a personal revolution, on an individual level. It’s got to happen inside first.
    -Jim Morrison

  5. #35
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    does this fit in this thread?

    Arthur Erickson, Architect
    MidCentury Architecture alerts us to architect Arthur Erickson who has done some amazing things with wood for residences in the Pacific Northwest.

    It's a bit late, but I can see the connection to Frank Lloyd Wright's aesthetic and approach, for instance. Feel free to contribute what you like, even if you aren't sure. There are no "rules" in the thread.
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  6. #36
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    lovin this thread so far.... and my sister was named after aubrey beardsley!! he's pretty cool.
    Thank you. And what a lovely name - your parents have good taste.

    French Aesthetic Furniture and Japonisme

    Émile Gallé: his biography and connection to Japonisme on the previous page with his glass work. Part of the École de Nancy, a center of French Art Nouveau craftsmanship to rival Paris, with Marjorelle, Gallé crafted furniture in his style of organic Japonisme. He advocated utility in furnishings and made certain that the ornamentation he added did not interfere with their easy use. At the same time, his embellishments were meant to be conspicuous and transformative, creating the potential for spiritual connection to the world's beauty. His editorials and other writings heavily influenced the craftsmen in Nancy.





    Louis Majorelle: Like fellow Nancy artist Gallé, Majorelle used marquetry to convey natural motifs in the style of Japanese woodblock.






    *** I'm going to revisit Majorelle and Gallé and their non-Japonisme furniture.
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  7. #37
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    Anglo-Japanese Aesthetic Movement Interior Spaces

    Pics and illustrations showing the integration of adapted Japanese aesthetic elements into living spaces prior to the Japonisme of the Art Nouveau.

    James Whistler (who was a big proponent of the Japanese aesthetic) designed this "Peacock Room" in 1876.







    Walter Crane: An 1870s illustration showing an interior with similar elements to the Peacock Room.



    Japanesque Aesthetic Design Plan 1880s color illustration of interior design.



    Some Misc. Prints of Japanesque Aesthetic Interiors/Interior Elements





    Last edited by BlueSprout; 01-17-2010 at 07:39 PM.
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  8. #38
    /X\(:: :: )/X\ BlueSprout's Avatar
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    For Hirsch63,

    Arts and Crafts, The Aesthetic Movement and Orientalism in American Furniture Making Pt I:

    The Aesthetic tradition in furniture making developed in the US at roughly the same time as it did in Europe.

    The increased Japanese influence on American aesthetics began shortly after Commodore Perry's forcible opening of Japan in 1853. Shortly thereafter, an influx of blue and white porcelain, lacquer and textiles became available to American consumers. The 1876 Philadelphia Exposition formally introduced an American audience to both the burgeoning European Aesthetic Movement and to Japanese arts and crafts. Publications dictating the standards of taste and home decorating served to heighten public demand for Japanesque Aesthetic goods. But the interest in the Japanese aesthetic was accompanied by a greater appreciation of all things Asian and Islamic, as Chinese, Moorish, etc. natural motifs and craft traditions also became incorporated into Aestheticism's ecclectic mix of influences.

    By the end of the 1870s, Japanesque, Orientalist and Aesthetic design principles had taken root in American craftsmanship. Like their European Aestheticist counterparts (though arguably to a lesser extent), some American designers may have looked to Japan as the best representative of the medievalism that was becoming increasingly romanticized. There was a perception that Japan had a purer, preindustrial artistic culture in which the artists were "still very much like those of medieval Europe.... both artist and artisan". Though the US arguably had no or few counterparts to European Aesthetic visionaries like EW Godwin, its craftsmen absorbed these influences and developed their own interpretations thereof.

    Starting with...

    George Hunzinger: Known for his folding chairs, Hunzinger used real and maple imitation bamboo, imitation lacquer ("ebonized" wood) and an extensive use of wood turning to produce Orientalist furniture along with many examples of the Renaissance Revival style. Unlike his Aestheticist contemporaries, Hunzinger embraced modern manufacturing. The interchangeable, interlocking parts and relative simplicity of many of his designs (when compared to conventional Victorian furniture, that is) were meant to facilitate mass production. While not considered an aestheticist per se, his innovative and ecclectic vision represented the similar and coinciding 'reform' style furnishings of the mid to late 19th century.

    Patents





    Some Examples of His Style









    TBC....
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  9. #39
    Senior Member mr.awesome's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady X View Post
    does this fit in this thread?




    Arthur Erickson, Architect
    MidCentury Architecture alerts us to architect Arthur Erickson who has done some amazing things with wood for residences in the Pacific Northwest.

    is this from the film "When A Stranger Calls"?

    edit: 69th post. giggity.
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  10. #40
    Senior Member Hirsch63's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueSprout View Post
    For Hirsch63,





    TBC....
    Thanks for the info! This settee is perhaps my favorite Hunzinger composition. The alternating rythm of the spheres in the base tie into the turned rings of the crest rail together implying a series of triangles superimposed upon the form. Indeed, the dispersal of cirlcular elements throughout some receding and some advancing keep the contemplation of this work a lively exercise. The choice of caning in the seat and back lighten what would have otherwise been a heavy appearance despite the careful proportioning. I find the outward curvilinear thrust of the arm rests to be a joyful counterpoint to the otherwise rectangular emphasis of the form. The conic terminals of the back provide a beautiful note of punctuation to the as the composition moves vertically to a close. Thanks again for a great piece!
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