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  1. #11
    Senior Member Veneti's Avatar
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    I hated Willian Shakespeare, taming of the shrew.

    I absolutely hated English and dropped it as soon as possible....

    Hmm... perhaps thats why INTJ's go more into science... not so much as it uses their intuition etc... but more that they can "cluster" together... They can be introverted in their labs, they can think and they can dream of the big solutions... Rather, than getting all touchy feely by showing non existent emotion towards something they don't give a monkeys about eg stage drama. Lucky I'm holding back.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veneti View Post
    I hated Willian Shakespeare, taming of the shrew.

    I absolutely hated English and dropped it as soon as possible....

    Hmm... perhaps thats why INTJ's go more into science... not so much as it uses their intuition etc... but more that they can "cluster" together... They can be introverted in their labs, they can think and they can dream of the big solutions... Rather, than getting all touchy feely by showing non existent emotion towards something they don't give a monkeys about eg stage drama. Lucky I'm holding back.
    I hated almost every book for which my first read was forced(and actually only read enough of them to get by). Luckily, I read a good percentage of my assigned reading before I was assigned to read them. I have sometimes attempted to revisit my assigned reading, knowing this about myself, but the resentment makes it hard for me to enjoy them.

    A clear exception, was college freshman English, in which the courses were divided by themes. I chose the holocaust themed literature class, and I found most of the reading very enlightening. Of those, I would say Night was my favorite.

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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  3. #13

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    I did not enjoy most assigned reading, simply because I resented that it was mandatory. However, I particularly enjoyed "Heart Of Darkness" and "The Misanthrope". Another assigned reading I enjoyed was "The Late Shift", although strictly speaking it was nonfiction rather than literature.

    I remember particularly disliking "Billy Budd" and "The Great Gatsby".

  4. #14
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    I didn't like most of the stuff I had to read in middle school, Westing Game I remember was one I liked, The Pearl is one I remember not liking (It was kind of boring, just went on and on and on.)

    School also did three Shakespeare stories: Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, and Henry IV part 1. I liked the Henry one, didn't like the other two. (Hamlet and Romeo and Juliet were pretty overdramatic, and people did a lot of things that didn't make sense.)


    In high school:

    Likes:
    To Kill a Mockingbird
    The Lottery (One I notice a lot of people like, it may be a good example in general for setting up and describing a story well.)
    Henry IV (mentioned above)
    Scarlet Letter
    Huck Finn
    Great Gatsby
    Jane Eyre (I didn't like it that much while reading it, as it went on and on and on during some parts, but afterwards seemed much better, the characters were a lot better in it than other stuff to read in school.)


    Dislikes:
    Hamlet (mentioned above)
    Antigone (Since all the characters knew what would happen, but just kind of made their decisions anyway, there wasn't really a way to get attached to the story, and it didn't have anything else in it to bring me in.)
    Doll House (Henrik Ibsen)
    A couple of "ethnic Identity" ones, that didn't have much of a story to them. (Which was kind of surprising, it seems that there would be more "minority" stuff out there with stories that have similar qualities to the other stuff we end up reading.)


    The biggest problem with a good chunk of the stuff to read in english classes is that it's kind of soap operaish, in that they are about a small group of people with some sort of situation that would be quite easy to resolve if they took a step back and thought about it, but for some reason they don't, and instead a lot of drama happens.

  5. #15
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zergling View Post
    I'm kind of curious what books people enjoyed and why, partially for curiosity and partially just for something to talk about (Since a lot of people probably take some sort of literature classes in various years of school.)
    Excuse. Forgive me if I am slow.
    What do you need literature classes for?
    The books are in the library.
    Do you need a class to get a book from the library? No.

    You do not know what to read, what is good, what is bad, etc. All right.
    Go to the librarian. Ask her. That is why she is there.

    Take the book home. Read a page or two. You know from the first page if a book is good or not. If you do not like the book take it back.
    Tell the librarian you did not like the book. If she gives you only bad books then you obviously have a different taste.

    In that case go to the bookshelves and pick a book at random. Read the first page. Put it back. Go on. You finally come to the book you like.
    This is what I did.

    You do not need classes. There you have to read books you do not like. Do not waste your time.

  6. #16
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    If I were a literature class teacher this is what I'd do.

    I take the children to the library immediately. I say: Go to the bookshelves and start picking books at random.
    Read the first page of each book. If you do not like the first page put the book back.
    If you do like the first page take the book and come to me.

    When the first kid comes to me with the book I say: Read now four more pages.

    When the kid comes to me again I ask: Did you like the first pages?
    If she says yes I say: Go home and read the book. When you have read it come to me and tell me why you liked it.
    If she says no I did not like it, I say: Take the book back and pick another book. Read the first page.. etc. You know the drill.

    Classroom is not a good idea. There you have to listen to people who discuss books that mean nothing to you. It is boring. Anything that is boring is a waste of time.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Eileen's Avatar
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    Hmm. It's hard to remember what I liked in HS. Brave New World, Fahrenheit 451, Cold Sassy Tree, Night... there were some good ones. The ones I really love teaching: Things Fall Apart, Night, The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, Their Eyes Were Watching God, A Raisin in the Sun...
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  8. #18
    Per Ardua Metamorphosis's Avatar
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    What makes a book a classic? Why do we read some books and not others? To me, if it is not non-fiction you cannot possibly measure the value of one book against another (excluding grammatical errors and such, obviously).
    "You will always be fond of me. I represent to you all the sins you never had the courage to commit."

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    than to serve and obey them. - David Hume

  9. #19
    Strongly Ambivalent Ivy's Avatar
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    Really? So, basically, in your opinion Danielle Steele = Charles Dickens = Kurt Vonnegut = Stephen King?
    The one who buggers a fire burns his penis
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    .....
    The point was more about books that people had to read in school, not classes that people took just to get to read. (As you might guess from reading the thread, people would not have read a lot of this stuff if taken to a library and let loose.)

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