User Tag List

Page 8 of 42 FirstFirst ... 67891018 ... LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 416

Thread: Favourite Poems & Poems that moved you

  1. #71
    meh Array Salomé's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    5w4 sx/sp
    Posts
    10,614

    Default DULCE ET DECORUM EST

    DULCE ET DECORUM EST

    Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
    Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
    Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs
    And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
    Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots
    But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
    Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
    Of tired, outstripped Five-Nines that dropped behind.

    Gas! Gas! Quick, boys! An ecstasy of fumbling,
    Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time;
    But someone still was yelling out and stumbling,
    And flound'ring like a man in fire or lime. . .
    Dim, through the misty panes and thick green light,
    As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.
    In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,
    He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

    If in some smothering dreams you too could pace
    Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
    And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
    His hanging face, like a devil's sick of sin;
    If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
    Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
    Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
    Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,
    My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
    To children ardent for some desperate glory,
    The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est
    Pro patria mori.

    Wilfred Owen
    Quote Originally Posted by Ivy View Post
    Gosh, the world looks so small from up here on my high horse of menstruation.

  2. #72
    Junior Member Array G.Kai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Jabberwocky

    'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
    Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
    All mimsy were the borogoves,
    And the mome raths outgrabe.

    "Beware the Jabberwock, my son!
    The jaws that bite, the claws that catch!
    Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun
    The frumious Bandersnatch!"

    He took his vorpal sword in hand:
    Long time the manxome foe he sought
    So rested he by the Tumtum tree,
    And stood awhile in thought.

    And as in uffish thought he stood,
    The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame,
    Came whiffling through the tulgey wood,
    And burbled as it came!

    One, two! One, two! and through and through
    The vorpal blade went snicker-snack!
    He left it dead, and with its head
    He went galumphing back.

    "And hast thou slain the Jabberwock?
    Come to my arms, my beamish boy!
    O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!"
    He chortled in his joy.

    'Twas brillig, and the slithy toves
    Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
    All mimsy were the borogoves,
    And the mome raths outgrabe.

  3. #73
    Reason vs Being Array ragashree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Mine
    Enneagram
    1w9
    Posts
    1,770

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bluemonday View Post
    DULCE ET DECORUM EST
    I quite like that one nowadays myself, though I was put off it for years after a sterotypical English teacher tried to make me read it at school, presumably on the basis that it was supposed to be good for me. They put me off A Midsummer Night's Dream that way too, though in that case time and maturity have only served to confirm my initial judgement...

    As far as Owen goes, perhaps I like "Strange Meeting" better. It's a close call.


    But here's my contribution, one of my favourite poems by Gerard Manley Hopkins. I think this one is all the better because (for a change!) he is not trying to force his religious convictions into a stream of thought where they do not really belong. I particularly like the spectacularly original (and very Hopkinsian) use of language and imagery; and the meticulously controlled diction that leads to the dark, almost despairing conclusion. I also enjoy the fact that there are several different but complementary ways of interpreting the concluding lines.


    The Sea and the Skylark

    ON ear and ear two noises too old to end
    Trenchright, the tide that ramps against the shore;
    With a flood or a fall, low lull-off or all roar,
    Frequenting there while moon shall wear and wend.

    Left hand, off land, I hear the lark ascend,
    His rash-fresh re-winded new-skeind score
    In crisps of curl off wild winch whirl, and pour
    And pelt music, till none s to spill nor spend.

    How these two shame this shallow and frail town!
    How ring right out our sordid turbid time,
    Being pure! We, lifes pride and cared-for crown,

    Have lost that cheer and charm of earths past prime:
    Our make and making break, are breaking, down
    To mans last dust, drain fast towards mans first slime.

    Gerard Manley Hopkins

  4. #74
    nevermore Array lane777's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    4w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    635

    Default

    Psalm 139:1-18

    Lord, you have searched me thoroughly and have known me. You know my downsitting and my uprising; You understand my thought afar off. You sift and search out my path and my lying down, and You are acquainted with all my ways. For there is not a word in my tongue still unuttered, but, behold, O Lord, You know it altogether. You have beset me and shut me in--behind and before, and You have laid Your hand upon me. Your infinite knowledge is too wonderful for me; it is high above me, I cannot reach it. Where could I go from Your Spirit? Or where could I flee from Your presence? If I ascend up into heaven, You are there; if I make my bed in Sheol, the place of the dead, behold, You are there. If I take the wings of the morning or dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there shall Your hand lead me, and Your right hand shall hold me. If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me and the night shall be the only light about me, even the darkness hides nothing from You, but the night shines as the day; the darkness and the light are both alike to You. For You did form my inward parts; You did knit me together in my mother's womb. I will confess and praise You for You are fearful and wonderful and for the awful wonder of my birth! Wonderful are Your works, and that my inner self knows right well. My frame was not hidden from You when I was being formed in secret, intricately and curiously wrought in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance, and in Your book all the days of my life were written before ever they took shape, when as yet there was none of them. How precious and weighty also are Your thoughts to me, O God! How vast is the sum of them! If I could count them, they would be more in number than the sand. When I awoke, could I count to the end, I would still be with You.
    To die would be an awfully big adventure - Peter Pan

    INFJ ~ 4w5 sp/sx ~ RLOAI ~ Inclusion e/w=1/0 (Melancholy Compulsive) Control: e/w=0/6 (Supine) Affection: e/w=4/0 (Phlegmatic Melancholy)

  5. #75
    Senior Member Array Eileen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6?
    Posts
    2,193

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lane777 View Post
    Psalm 139:1-18
    That one is my favorite.
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

  6. #76
    Senior Member Array bronte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    168

    Default

    High Flight

    Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
    And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
    Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
    Of sun-split clouds, and done a hundred things
    You have not dreamed of wheeled and soared and swung
    High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there,
    I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
    My eager craft through footless halls of air. . . .

    Up, up the long, delirious burning blue
    I've topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
    Where never lark, or ever eagle flew
    And, while with silent, lifting mind I've trod
    The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
    Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.

    John Gillespie Magee, Jr
    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
    Maya Angelou

  7. #77
    Senior Member Array bronte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    168

    Default

    Gerard Manley Hopkins (184489). Poems. 1918.

    The Windhover



    I CAUGHT this morning mornings minion, king-
    dom of daylights dauphin, dapple-dawn-drawn Falcon, in his riding
    Of the rolling level underneath him steady air, and striding
    High there, how he rung upon the rein of a wimpling wing
    In his ecstasy! then off, off forth on swing,
    As a skates heel sweeps smooth on a bow-bend: the hurl and gliding
    Rebuffed the big wind. My heart in hiding
    Stirred for a bird,the achieve of; the mastery of the thing!

    Brute beauty and valour and act, oh, air, pride, plume, here
    Buckle! AND the fire that breaks from thee then, a billion
    Times told lovelier, more dangerous, O my chevalier!

    No wonder of it: sher pld makes plough down sillion
    Shine, and blue-bleak embers, ah my dear,
    Fall, gall themselves, and gash gold-vermillion.
    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
    Maya Angelou

  8. #78
    Reason vs Being Array ragashree's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    Mine
    Enneagram
    1w9
    Posts
    1,770

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bronte View Post
    Gerard Manley Hopkins (184489). Poems. 1918.

    The Windhover
    Nice choice!

    But it should really contain the following explicatory subtitle below the main heading:

    To Christ Our Lord
    Maybe that isn't in the 1918 version, but it is in all the others as far as I know, and it's much harder to follow without it!

  9. #79
    Senior Member Array bronte's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    MBTI
    infp
    Posts
    168

    Default

    a modern one

    Simple lyric

    When I think of her sparkling face
    And of her body that rocked this way and that,
    When I think of her laughter,
    Her jubilance that filled me,
    Its a wonder Im not gone mad.

    She is away and I cannot do what I want.
    Other faces pale when I get close.
    She is away and I cannot breathe her in.

    The space her leaving has created
    I have attempted to fill
    With bodies that numbed upon touching,
    Among them I expected her opposite,
    And found only forgeries.

    Her wholeness I know to be a fiction of my making,
    Still I cannot dismiss the longing for her;
    It is a craving for sensation new flesh
    Cannot wholly calm or cancel,
    It is perhaps for more than her.

    At night above the parks the stars are swarming.
    The streets are thick with nostalgia;
    I move through senseless routine and insensitive chatter
    As if her going did not matter.
    She is away and I cannot breathe her in.
    I am ill simply through wanting her.

    Brian Patten
    I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
    Maya Angelou

  10. #80
    Senior Member Array Eileen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    6?
    Posts
    2,193

    Default

    I love a lot of African American poets, especially Harlem Renaissance ones...

    Quote Originally Posted by Langston Hughes
    The Negro Speaks of Rivers

    I've known rivers:
    I've known rivers ancient as the world and older than the
    flow of human blood in human veins.

    My soul has grown deep like the rivers.

    I bathed in the Euphrates when dawns were young.
    I built my hut near the Congo and it lulled me to sleep.
    I looked upon the Nile and raised the pyramids above it.
    I heard the singing of the Mississippi when Abe Lincoln
    went down to New Orleans, and I've seen its muddy
    bosom turn all golden in the sunset.

    I've known rivers:
    Ancient, dusky rivers.

    My soul has grown deep like the rivers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Langston Hughes
    Let America be America again.
    Let it be the dream it used to be.
    Let it be the pioneer on the plain
    Seeking a home where he himself is free.

    (America never was America to me.)

    Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed--
    Let it be that great strong land of love
    Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme
    That any man be crushed by one above.

    (It never was America to me.)

    O, let my land be a land where Liberty
    Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,
    But opportunity is real, and life is free,
    Equality is in the air we breathe.

    (There's never been equality for me,
    Nor freedom in this "homeland of the free.")

    Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?
    And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

    I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
    I am the Negro bearing slavery's scars.
    I am the red man driven from the land,
    I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek--
    And finding only the same old stupid plan
    Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

    I am the young man, full of strength and hope,
    Tangled in that ancient endless chain
    Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!
    Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!
    Of work the men! Of take the pay!
    Of owning everything for one's own greed!

    I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.
    I am the worker sold to the machine.
    I am the Negro, servant to you all.
    I am the people, humble, hungry, mean--
    Hungry yet today despite the dream.
    Beaten yet today--O, Pioneers!
    I am the man who never got ahead,
    The poorest worker bartered through the years.

    Yet I'm the one who dreamt our basic dream
    In the Old World while still a serf of kings,
    Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,
    That even yet its mighty daring sings
    In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned
    That's made America the land it has become.
    O, I'm the man who sailed those early seas
    In search of what I meant to be my home--
    For I'm the one who left dark Ireland's shore,
    And Poland's plain, and England's grassy lea,
    And torn from Black Africa's strand I came
    To build a "homeland of the free."

    The free?

    Who said the free? Not me?
    Surely not me? The millions on relief today?
    The millions shot down when we strike?
    The millions who have nothing for our pay?
    For all the dreams we've dreamed
    And all the songs we've sung
    And all the hopes we've held
    And all the flags we've hung,
    The millions who have nothing for our pay--
    Except the dream that's almost dead today.

    O, let America be America again--
    The land that never has been yet--
    And yet must be--the land where every man is free.
    The land that's mine--the poor man's, Indian's, Negro's, ME--
    Who made America,
    Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
    Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
    Must bring back our mighty dream again.

    Sure, call me any ugly name you choose--
    The steel of freedom does not stain.
    From those who live like leeches on the people's lives,
    We must take back our land again,
    America!

    O, yes,
    I say it plain,
    America never was America to me,
    And yet I swear this oath--
    America will be!

    Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,
    The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,
    We, the people, must redeem
    The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.
    The mountains and the endless plain--
    All, all the stretch of these great green states--
    And make America again!

    Quote Originally Posted by Claude McKay
    Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,
    And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth,
    Stealing my breath of life, I will confess
    I love this cultured hell that tests my youth!
    Her vigor flows like tides into my blood,
    Giving me strength erect against her hate.
    Her bigness sweeps my being like a flood.
    Yet as a rebel fronts a king in state,
    I stand within her walls with not a shred
    Of terror, malice, not a word of jeer.
    Darkly I gaze into the days ahead,
    And see her might and granite wonders there,
    Beneath the touch of Time's unerring hand,
    Like priceless treasures sinking in the sand.
    INFJ

    "I can never be what I ought to be until you are what you ought to be. You can never be what you ought to be until I am what I ought to be. This is the interrelated structure of reality." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

Similar Threads

  1. Only Poems Bleed
    By Mole in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-14-2012, 09:20 PM
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-18-2008, 11:50 PM
  3. Where to Submit Poems???
    By spartan26 in forum Arts & Entertainment
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-30-2007, 04:43 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO