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DigitalMethod
05-23-2008, 03:59 AM
Yeah, how's that work out? Just wondering how you INTJs have avoided or coped with depression within your own life.

Haphazard
05-23-2008, 01:26 PM
I don't know about depression, but I try not to let life get me down.

There's so much to do. When I feel the stagnation creep up on me, I throw myself into something new. I need it, I love it I thrive on it. I need something to dedicate myself to, and there's no shortage of projects.

MetalWounds
05-23-2008, 01:44 PM
Depression, for me at least, is like Carbon Monoxide poisoning. It creeps in silently, I tend not to even know it's coming. The worst part is that I don't become your typical depressive sufferer. Everything just goes flat. No happiness, no sadness. Not a lack of motivation, but not much to speak of either. Most people (even those close to me) would never be able to tell, I just seem normal. I've been depressed for as long as a year, it just became a part of my life, who I was.

Just before I got deployed I was fast approaching critical mass. By anyone's standards I was very much an alcoholic. I would drink 6 nights a week, work nights, weekends, it didn't matter. When I drank I was everybody's favorite person to be around. Happy, funny, you name it. When I was sober I would be negative and openly combative. If you read into the Enneagram, I was a very unhealthy type 8.

Like Haphazard said, avoid stagnation, that's really the best way for an INTJ to stay healthy. As INTJs, we don't do very well to mull over past mistakes. Live for the future, to hell with yesterday. When I get down I constantly obsess over what I've done wrong to a point where it interferes with my life.

entropie
05-24-2008, 12:40 AM
I can feel with you. Treating obsessions with obsession, is one of my specialities too. A long time ago I was addicted to marijuana in combination with heavy drinking. I lost my car license in that time and in my country you have to go through a straight medical and psychological profile to get it back.

With no help from the outside, I pulled the plug to that way of living myself and today after nearly 2 years, I even got my car license back :). Except for my personal flaws, I have all the time, no one was involved in me being that strong to help me myself. All that conviction in that time to myself and a lot of obpressed feelings, nowadays come to live and want their tribute for being so calm in those days.

I have, by the way no idea of how to help iNTj cope with depression. I think iNTj are the ones who are of all intuitional personality types, one of the strongest. And like MetalWounds saied, they best help themselves.

But there always needs to be room for depression ! Without depression being recognized it will haunt you.

sriv
05-24-2008, 12:56 AM
I spend so much energy combatting depression because of its obvious detrimental results/purposes that I end up drained and lethargic going about daily activities.

EffEmDoubleyou
05-24-2008, 04:24 AM
I'm in it pretty deep right now. If I climb out of it, I'll report back.

Firelie
05-24-2008, 04:50 AM
I react much the same way to depression as I do to extreme stress...I just want to shut down and sit around watching television.

The only thing I can really do is realize what's going on and force myself to get out of the house and do something else. Exercise helps a lot.

But mine tends to be like what MetalWounds described...everything just goes flat and nobody can tell but me.

Haphazard
05-24-2008, 01:37 PM
I don't know. When I get really upset, I become more physically sick than anything else. Dizzy and nauseated, etc. After a particularly bad week, my mother thought I had the flu. Eugh. It's a little like my feelings know they won't get any attention, so they go ahead and muck up my body.

I know I have to do something, but it can't involve moving so much. Drawing and writing are usually best, but not about anything that's going on at the moment.

DigitalMethod
05-24-2008, 04:47 PM
For me, I become flat also, although other people can usually tell if they know me well enough. I get a totally blank face, no expression. If anything happy or sad happens in my life, I will think about it for 10 seconds, "wow that was ____", then after that, just flat, I don't care. It's like I don't have any feelings, it's sorta scary.

I don't enjoy any of the old stuff I use to, such as video games, and graphic design, those things were always fun to me, I could do them for hours. Now when I do those things they just turn into a way to waste my time. It feels like that because they don't bring any joy into my life like they use to. It's definitely related to the whole "no feelings, no caring, flatness" thing.

I use to care about my grades in high school, I would study when needed to, but recently I find myself just not caring about it. I am also in college, but I am in the 2/5th of the year in which I do not attend so I don't know if my depression would affect my grades in college, although I think I tend to care more about college because it seems more... important, than high school.

I would go find something to do yeah, a "project" or obsession that I could move on with, but right now, the whole feeling of flatness just doesn't care about getting a new project.

I don't ever plan to even try alcohol, mainly because I am an INTJ and alcoholism runs in my family, I know with those two combined factors I would become addicted and it would screw me over.

I find myself just surfing the internet a lot of the time, trying to fill some kind of void that I cannot see. I guess it's my own way of trying to find a new project. Like if I find something, it will act as a key, and unlock the chains of my depression.

Aerithria
05-25-2008, 05:50 AM
Huh. I never realized this was an INTJ thing, but merely a "I must be the most screwed up person on the planet" thing. The trend follows suit for me as well. Muted-to-absent emotions coupled with conversion disorder, though instead of flu-like symptoms it's migraines for me. It's interesting though. After years and years of being called an emotionless jerk, depression follows through with the stereotype. The irony doesn't fail to amuse me.

I went to a shrink once with disastrous results, so I mostly attempt to deal with it myself. I think it's harder for us because not only are we wired differently than most people, but we are also more prone to be disconnected from our emotions. I think most people end up trying to solve a problem in their lives, but the reason we have trouble is that if it were a problem to be solved we could probably fix it in some way or another without pause. Our problems are more likely to be caused by the lack of a problem rather than the lack of a solution. But that's mostly speculative, and may only apply to me. I don't know.

Bah, it's late, I'm tired, so if this doesn't make any sense feel free to whack me with a rubber chicken, because I don't know. I could be speaking in sign language for all I can tell.

DigitalMethod
05-25-2008, 02:11 PM
Huh. I never realized this was an INTJ thing, but merely a "I must be the most screwed up person on the planet" thing. The trend follows suit for me as well. Muted-to-absent emotions coupled with conversion disorder, though instead of flu-like symptoms it's migraines for me. It's interesting though. After years and years of being called an emotionless jerk, depression follows through with the stereotype. The irony doesn't fail to amuse me.

I went to a shrink once with disastrous results, so I mostly attempt to deal with it myself. I think it's harder for us because not only are we wired differently than most people, but we are also more prone to be disconnected from our emotions. I think most people end up trying to solve a problem in their lives, but the reason we have trouble is that if it were a problem to be solved we could probably fix it in some way or another without pause. Our problems are more likely to be caused by the lack of a problem rather than the lack of a solution. But that's mostly speculative, and may only apply to me. I don't know.

Bah, it's late, I'm tired, so if this doesn't make any sense feel free to whack me with a rubber chicken, because I don't know. I could be speaking in sign language for all I can tell.

Hmm, I don't get migraines, but I do get called an emotionless jerk a lot. Certainly it isn't an INTJ thing, but I think we deal with it differently than others, like you said, we are wired differently. What happened at the shrink?

I think your post made complete sense in my opinion, thanks.

Aerithria
05-25-2008, 10:47 PM
Heh, he claimed that all my problems were being caused by me not being vocal about my feelings, and he attempted to get my ESFJ mother to bring that out in me. When that failed, he started connecting anything I said to unrelated events in the past as "causes". After that failed, he tried to "help me find God", as he put it. Eventually I got so frustrated that I just told him what he wanted to hear so I could get out of there. Either he was terrible at his job or he's never dealt with anyone who wasn't using Fe.

Firelie
05-27-2008, 01:05 AM
Heh, he claimed that all my problems were being caused by me not being vocal about my feelings, and he attempted to get my ESFJ mother to bring that out in me. When that failed, he started connecting anything I said to unrelated events in the past as "causes". After that failed, he tried to "help me find God", as he put it. Eventually I got so frustrated that I just told him what he wanted to hear so I could get out of there. Either he was terrible at his job or he's never dealt with anyone who wasn't using Fe.

Or perhaps both.

Spartacuss
05-27-2008, 01:59 AM
Heh, he claimed that all my problems were being caused by me not being vocal about my feelings, and he attempted to get my ESFJ mother to bring that out in me. When that failed, he started connecting anything I said to unrelated events in the past as "causes". After that failed, he tried to "help me find God", as he put it. Eventually I got so frustrated that I just told him what he wanted to hear so I could get out of there. Either he was terrible at his job or he's never dealt with anyone who wasn't using Fe.

I've always wondered about people with atypical worldviews or wiring going to shrinks and how open-minded/versatile shrinks are in being able to speak to them in any meaningful way. Your story doesn't reassure me that the average psych would be anything but utterly useless. The outlook looks dim, and is even dimmer when you consider that these are the very people who may be more driven to need a shrink after wearing themselves out trying to adapt to the rest of the world.

Aerithria
05-27-2008, 04:38 AM
I've always wondered about people with atypical worldviews or wiring going to shrinks and how open-minded/versatile shrinks are in being able to speak to them in any meaningful way. Your story doesn't reassure me that the average psych would be anything but utterly useless. The outlook looks dim, and is even dimmer when you consider that these are the very people who may be more driven to need a shrink after wearing themselves out trying to adapt to the rest of the world.
I know. My thought was that if they can handle people with reality-altering disorders, like schizophrenia, then they should be able to deal with people who process life differently. Hm. Perhaps that was my mistake. I should have gone to a specialist in reality disorders, because apparently our reality isn't quite good enough. Bah.

Keep in mind that my account is only one, and I did mention that he sounded like a moron. I'll bet there probably are some psychiatrists who are able to comprehend other worldviews without forcing the norm onto them. I think I've read about them, at least.

@Firelie: Probably.

DigitalMethod
05-27-2008, 10:16 PM
I never thought that different personalities dealt with depression differently. It's enlightening.

entropie
05-28-2008, 01:15 AM
I never thought that different personalities dealt with depression differently. It's enlightening.

Just, dont start to look much more deeper into it, I was told that people who try so are reserved a special place in the one flew over it kinda thing xD

OK Radio
05-28-2008, 03:17 AM
I think it's harder for us because not only are we wired differently than most people, but we are also more prone to be disconnected from our emotions. I think most people end up trying to solve a problem in their lives, but the reason we have trouble is that if it were a problem to be solved we could probably fix it in some way or another without pause. Our problems are more likely to be caused by the lack of a problem rather than the lack of a solution.

Is there anything else besides solving problems or not solving problems to live by? I believe I'd be happier if I didn't care about solving problems. I'd still help people, and I'd concentrate on helping myself just as much as other people, but it wouldn't count for as much in my life.

I want to save the world and myself; I don't want to care if I fail on occasion.

Ishida
06-01-2008, 07:49 AM
Depression, for me at least, is like Carbon Monoxide poisoning. It creeps in silently, I tend not to even know it's coming. The worst part is that I don't become your typical depressive sufferer. Everything just goes flat. No happiness, no sadness. Not a lack of motivation, but not much to speak of either. Most people (even those close to me) would never be able to tell, I just seem normal. I've been depressed for as long as a year, it just became a part of my life, who I was.

Just before I got deployed I was fast approaching critical mass. By anyone's standards I was very much an alcoholic. I would drink 6 nights a week, work nights, weekends, it didn't matter. When I drank I was everybody's favorite person to be around. Happy, funny, you name it. When I was sober I would be negative and openly combative. If you read into the Enneagram, I was a very unhealthy type 8.

Like Haphazard said, avoid stagnation, that's really the best way for an INTJ to stay healthy. As INTJs, we don't do very well to mull over past mistakes. Live for the future, to hell with yesterday. When I get down I constantly obsess over what I've done wrong to a point where it interferes with my life.

My experience was similar. Very similar. (Except I couldn't buy or care to drink alcohol.) Even the solving of it is similar. Though a couple people said they could tell, even though they never said anything.

Spartacuss
06-06-2008, 12:26 AM
I know. My thought was that if they can handle people with reality-altering disorders, like schizophrenia, then they should be able to deal with people who process life differently. Hm. Perhaps that was my mistake. I should have gone to a specialist in reality disorders, because apparently our reality isn't quite good enough. Bah.

Yeah, they "deal with" them as ill people with distorted realities who need treatment to come around. If you're not hallucinating and paranoid, the psych's limited in what, besides listening, s/he can do for you.



Keep in mind that my account is only one, and I did mention that he sounded like a moron. I'll bet there probably are some psychiatrists who are able to comprehend other worldviews without forcing the norm onto them. I think I've read about them, at least.

ha! Good luck with that.

FallsPioneer
06-07-2008, 08:47 AM
INTJs experience everything in a hardcore, totally immersed way, albeit not in a typical style. The most important thing of note is the whole obsessiveness thing-that perpetually massive willpower is being devoted to something self-destructive-so that willpower and focus has to be somehow be redirected into something positive, regardless of the logical and philosophical reasons ("It's not a solution, it's a placebo" etc.)

Depressed INTJs aren't so much astoundingly sad as they are total zombies.

aparkedcar
06-21-2008, 01:00 AM
well, I was in a really deep rut of depression and God delivered me from that, thankfully. But as for the whole not feeling anything, I totally understand. I wish I could really do something significant with my life right now, but I'm in college, and I just feel like I'm in a transitioning state, not really getting anywhere.....

01011010
06-24-2008, 09:53 AM
INTJs experience everything in a hardcore, totally immersed way, albeit not in a typical style. The most important thing of note is the whole obsessiveness thing-that perpetually massive willpower is being devoted to something self-destructive-so that willpower and focus has to be somehow be redirected into something positive, regardless of the logical and philosophical reasons ("It's not a solution, it's a placebo" etc.)

Depressed INTJs aren't so much astoundingly sad as they are total zombies.

I always felt I was such an oddball for being so intense. When I want to learn about anything, I plunge in headfirst and don't come out of it until I feel I understand everything clearly. One of my exes was amazed I was always into and learning something new all the time. Sorry, for the tangent.

Zombie is totally right. I just go through the motions and most aspects in my life are stagnant. It's best to never let depression creep up on you in the first place.

Xenofile
04-10-2009, 05:25 AM
I'm a 19-year-old INTJ with bipolar disorder, and I've found that during the periods when I've dealt with depression I've experienced both the depression of deep sadness and that of flat gnawing boredom (this later often while under the effects of mood stabilizers.) In my opinion, though the deep sadness feels like its gnawing a hole through you; it isn't as bad as feeling like a dead man walking.

As a somewhat off-topic note I figure I'll also give a bit of commentary on my experience with mania. I'm no stranger to skipping a night of sleep here or there, but when I was in a manic state I didn't sleep at all for 3 days straight, and after that only with the assistance of large doses of sleep meds (and even then I onl got around 4 hours a day.) My mood cycled between blind euphoria, intense adgitation, and fear over my conditions, which included visual and auditory hallucinations. Finally, it ended when anti-mania and anti-psychotic combined to knocked me out for 18 hours and the ensuing depression led me to turn myself in at the emergency room before I did anything harmful.

I've found that exercise is one of the only things that can really get my mind off depression, endorphins are magnificent.

TaylorS
04-16-2009, 01:35 PM
When I have a depressive episode my tertiary Fi and inferior Se tend to emerge in very negative ways while my auxiliary Te tends to be suppressed, turning me into an emotional, sobbing, worrying, self-medicating wreck that can't get anything done.

Misty_Mountain_Rose
04-16-2009, 03:44 PM
When I have a depressive episode my tertiary Fi and inferior Se tend to emerge in very negative ways while my auxiliary Te tends to be suppressed, turning me into an emotional, sobbing, worrying, self-medicating wreck that can't get anything done.

+1

I might add that during these times is when I've made some of the worst mistakes of my life - completely irrational and most often sensory related. (Over drinking, sex, reckless behaviour)

I can't seem to accomplish anything in this state, the 'zombie' rings true. On the outside I may appear to be alive and moving, but inside I'm in a state of either numb thoughtlessness, or anxious worry.

nonsequitur
04-16-2009, 03:51 PM
I'm on anti-depressives, they help me feel disconnected from the sense of what is "my life". They stopped me being a suicidal alcoholic and I also stopped feeling like crying for no reason.

What helped more, and actually turned my mind positive was that I've just started a new project in a completely new work environment, which seems (at the moment) to have endless opportunities and excitement.

Aleph-One
04-17-2009, 05:40 AM
I know where everyone is coming from, here. When I get depressed I do it hardcore. Usually I just switch off and go almost cataleptic until I've untangled everything. That can take a while because I can't plan things out if I don't have a clear head, and I don't have a clear head if I haven't planned things out. After a good sulk I can usually sleep it off, and I feel really chipper the next day.

WithoutaFace
04-17-2009, 06:29 AM
When I am depressed I tend to internalize everything. It usually manifests as chest aches, sneezing, coughing, and general apathy all around. It's tough for me to deal with depressive episodes.

However, I found what helps me is:
Extraverting myself. It really helps. Not necessarily sharing your feeling directly with other people, but taking on projects with groups of people. Distract yourself from depression by working with others towards a common goal. That's what I do, I hope it helps DM.

Juliette
03-19-2011, 05:06 PM
Fully agree that extroverting oneself helps in this case. I had a depression long before I knew I'm an INTJ and intuitively found the way out via opening to my family. Then I tried to analyze it and it looked like this:

Your "I" makes you hide and spend even more time on your own.
Your "N" brings you dark visions and all possible scenarios to sad ending. You spend more and more time drawing them out in your mind, caring about all the details, loosing yourself so much that those visions seem real.
Your "T" says your state is nobody's fault by yours, depression is a natual selection to eliminate the weak and you were selected. You want to hide even more, so you don't bother others with your state - they will not understand, anyway, and will laugh you out.
Your "J" says that you're wasting your time and should put your energy in something more productive. And you feel guilty.

I guess that Pink Floyd was very good in portraining INTJ / INTP in depression. "The Wall" album is good in describing the whole picture, including "The Trial" song, which shows the way out. And "The Final Cut" song is more or less how I felt wondering if I should open myself to people or not.

Hope it helps.

6.4
03-20-2011, 04:08 AM
I cope with depression by dealing each second with each second. Depression is like an endless void-man, no matter how much I run, maneuver or try to out smart that guy is always there. Always right behind me I can feel him/her on my shoulder at all times. Always smiling at me. I often smile back and walk closer and closer and the closer I get the more his grin widens. But just as I get right next to him I spit in his face and run away again. I fight him frequently. Frequently I lose a little bit, like he takes a little piece of me and so I continue to search everywhere for inspiration. Little things that build me up and repair me. Things that make me stronger. From music to TV to books to sport to people to situations to experiences. Temporary distractions help too.

He'll never go away, I've basically accepted that. My depression is part of who I am, sure he keeps me from 'fulfilling my potential' but maybe my potential wouldn't be there without him. My point is that my battles with depression have made me 'stronger' and I cope by reminding myself that as long I stay fighting, then I am still alive with endless possibilities in front of me.

Although tbh sometimes I wish depression would seriously fuck off and die. What a cunt depression is, fuck me. There is no emoticon for how much of a dickhead it is. I should probably exercise too but I can't be arsed, happy people achieve fuck all anyway.




Apologies for this post.

Thisica
03-20-2011, 04:57 AM
It's confirmation bias hell [thinking I'm in poor health, despite the fact that I'm not!, etc.], manifested in rigid movements of the body, and unwilling to get out of the house.

Jwill
03-26-2011, 03:50 AM
I don't really get depressed. I love myself and the possibilities of life too much to ever get truly depressed. From what everyone has said, I guess the closest thing to depression for me is boredom. If I find something I love or feel committed to, I find a new lease on life. Or, if I feel really upset or guilty about something, I talk a long nap and wake up with a clear conscience. I'm great at compartmentalizing.

Anyway, I have a lot of depression in my family, and I think a good tip to beat it is to share your problems with someone else. As INTJs, we don't like to do that. But I think that keeping your depression to yourself is one of the worst ways to cope. Trying to fix your problem on your own (a huge tendency of INTJs) can be very detrimental. I love typology and everything, but I don't think the answer to depression lies in MBTI or Enneagram alone. I'll stop before I begin sounding like a Prozac commercial.

bscheff90
04-02-2011, 09:03 PM
Yeah, how's that work out? Just wondering how you INTJs have avoided or coped with depression within your own life.

well, it depends on what is causing my feelings of depression.. Usually its a present circumstance that is bothing me, so i try to look to the future and realize that I ultimatly have control of where I end up in life

YWIR
04-02-2011, 10:46 PM
This thread is depressing me.