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dynamiteninja
05-12-2009, 05:36 PM
ISFP
Percy Shelley
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Ana´s Nin
Ian Fleming
Nick Hornby
Jeanette Winterson
Daphne Du Maurier

ESTP
F Scott Fitzgerald
Ernest Hemingway
Norman Mailer

ISTP
Dan Simmons

J M Barrie and Mario Puzo are SPs. Maybe Sinclair Lewis and Christina Rossetti?


I want to hear agreements/disagreements with the above list and other suggestions...

riel
05-13-2009, 08:57 AM
I can't really tell for sure for I haven't read any of their works, but I already heard their names. Can you suggest the personality type of some famous writers today like J.K. Rowling(Harry Potter), Dan Brown(The Da Vinci Code; Angels and Demons), and others? I'm jparticularly interested on whether these writers have personality types in common.

dynamiteninja
05-28-2009, 09:02 PM
I can't really tell for sure for I haven't read any of their works, but I already heard their names. Can you suggest the personality type of some famous writers today like J.K. Rowling(Harry Potter), Dan Brown(The Da Vinci Code; Angels and Demons), and others? I'm jparticularly interested on whether these writers have personality types in common.

JK: ENFP
Dan Brown: INFJ

Search for the author thread I made for more.

Sidewinder
06-26-2009, 02:24 AM
I want to hear agreements/disagreements with the above list and other suggestions...

I'm fairly confident that John Irving is ISFP. You have him as ISFJ, but his bio marks him as an SP. He had some trouble in school and conventional learning was difficult for him, but he became interested in wrestling, and gained confidence that way. And he really appreciates the craft of writing. You might think he's SJ because he starts with the last sentence. But that's more of a technique, I think.

William Wordsworth is definitely ISFP as well. C'mon, he's the original "nature boy"! :cheese: He was also well known for his skill in landscape/garden design, which is a very ISFP interest. Many of his quotes are filled with concrete terms, and The Prelude reads like an ISFP memoir. Oh, and check the first stanza of Michael. :yes:

I think Mr. "Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know" Lord Bryon was ESTP. I'm not as sure about that one. The heroic adventures seem SP, the eccentricity less so.

I'd add Colin MacInnes ("Absolute Beginners") to ISFP. The one biography I found paints him that way, and the book is full of imagery, slang, and street life. Ed Vulliamy on writer Colin MacInnes | UK news | The Observer (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2007/apr/15/britishidentity.fiction)

There's not many SP writers, really. We've probably found most of them. Nice idea for a thread. :)

dynamiteninja
06-26-2009, 01:14 PM
I'm fairly confident that John Irving is ISFP. You have him as ISFJ, but his bio marks him as an SP. He had some trouble in school and conventional learning was difficult for him, but he became interested in wrestling, and gained confidence that way. And he really appreciates the craft of writing. You might think he's SJ because he starts with the last sentence. But that's more of a technique, I think.

William Wordsworth is definitely ISFP as well. C'mon, he's the original "nature boy"! :cheese: He was also well known for his skill in landscape/garden design, which is a very ISFP interest. Many of his quotes are filled with concrete terms, and The Prelude reads like an ISFP memoir. Oh, and check the first stanza of Michael. :yes:

I think Mr. "Mad, Bad and Dangerous to Know" Lord Bryon was ESTP. I'm not as sure about that one. The heroic adventures seem SP, the eccentricity less so.

I'd add Colin MacInnes ("Absolute Beginners") to ISFP. The one biography I found paints him that way, and the book is full of imagery, slang, and street life. Ed Vulliamy on writer Colin MacInnes | UK news | The Observer (http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2007/apr/15/britishidentity.fiction)

There's not many SP writers, really. We've probably found most of them. Nice idea for a thread. :)

Very interesting. I've responded here: http://www.typologycentral.com/forums/popular-culture-type/13672-dn-s-author-type-list-iii-16.html

dynamiteninja
09-09-2009, 03:36 PM
Update:

ISFP
John Steinbeck
Laura Ingalls Wilder
Ian Fleming
Jeanette Winterson
Daphne Du Maurier
Mario Puzo
John Irving
William Wordsworth
Colin MacInnes
Dorothy Parker
Quentin Blake
F Scott Fitzgerald

ESTP
Ernest Hemingway
Norman Mailer

ISTP
Dan Simmons


J M Barrie was probably some sort of SP. Possibly Don DeLillo (IxFP) and Charles Bukowski (IxFP).

brainheart
09-09-2009, 04:43 PM
Walt Whitman has to be on there somewhere... "And the cow crunching with depressed neck surpasses every statue.../ And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger trillions of infidels."

I would peg him an ISFP, although I can't be certain. He seems to be quite heavy with the introverted feeling, especially considering how he worked as a nurse during the Civil War.

Laura Ingalls Wilder, I want to say ISFP (because as a child I worshiped those books and related to them tremendously), but I think that might just be her writing style and topic vs who she really was. I read an article about her recently and she seemed to be extremely SJ (very conservative, traditional). Her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, who was much more of an adventuresome free spirit helped her considerably in the writing of her books. I think Ma in the books is more Laura while Laura (the character) is more Rose, if that makes any sense...

I second John Irving and John Steinbeck. Ooo, and I hope Dorothy Parker! I've also heard Sylvia Plath as an ISFP, but not positive. I've read a lot of her work and she was very physical, sensual. She wrote pages about how her body felt after taking a shower. I could see some tertiary Ni in there skewing her perspective of the world, which could have led to her mental illness. Her intuition didn't seem to be of the well-developed, healthy sort. It basically led to her jumping to unhealthy, irrational conclusions.

What about Oscar Wilde? I'm not saying yay or nay, but is it possible? He was kind of a trend-setting epitome of cool, not to mention he wrote a whole book about someone who was obsessed with getting old. ESFP?

TickTock
09-09-2009, 06:42 PM
JK: ENFP
Dan Brown: INFJ

Search for the author thread I made for more.

Rowling is definately an Introvert. Most likely an infj

the state i am in
09-09-2009, 07:28 PM
whitman is a dominant intuitive entp. i thought isfp for steinbeck but in discussion i am getting convinced infp makes more sense. i could see either. i thought dynamite's enfj reading on john irving made a lot of sense too, more than isfp. anais is definitely inj, probably infj.

dynamiteninja
09-09-2009, 07:40 PM
whitman is a dominant intuitive entp. i thought isfp for steinbeck but in discussion i am getting convinced infp makes more sense. i could see either. i thought dynamite's enfj reading on john irving made a lot of sense too, more than isfp. anais is definitely inj, probably infj.

Explain why INFP for Steinbeck. Can't an ISFP champion the rights of the worker? When did I type Irving as ENFJ? Maybe I just can't remember although I did type Updike as ENFJ. I think Anais is INFJ, you're looking at the out of date list at the top of the page. The newer one is midway down.

the state i am in
09-09-2009, 09:30 PM
When did I type Irving as ENFJ? Maybe I just can't remember although I did type Updike as ENFJ.

misreading on my part. i read it as updike, and meant it for updike.

i'd probably leave steinbeck as isfp tho i'm still not completely satisfied. an intj was trying to convince me of infpness, tho his overall direction seems more Se to me than Ne, and he does write in general truisms frequently which feels more isfp than infp. he does seem like his perceptions are his perceptions more than infps, who feel like they question their own perceptions more often, see them from more angles, etc.

brainheart
09-09-2009, 09:41 PM
whitman is a dominant intuitive entp.

Explain to me why, please.