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  1. #51
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dissonance View Post
    Why?
    Because he'd be rich, probably, lol
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  2. #52
    EvanTheClown (ETC) Clownmaster's Avatar
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    To the OP: Good parenting and a healthy lifestyle for the child should be incentive enough to make good grades imo. If your kid inherited excessive rebellion, force them to eat vegetables or some other healthy torture for if they get C's XD

    Because you can't spell "Slaughter" without "Laughter"

  3. #53
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    I don't think it's a good idea to pay kids for grades, though I don't think it's particularly terrible either, and it might work out well for some kids. I don't think it would have worked well for me, I was too stubborn to have been bribed, plus the cost:benefit ratio is far too high.

    Quote Originally Posted by Gen View Post
    Most Ns non-SJs in the U.S.north america would probably IME agree that the system feels extremely S Si biased with all its emphasis on rote learning.
    Fixed. I can't speak for all SPs but I certainly wasn't thrilled with the excitement of my classes, in grade school at least.

    Really though, I've seen about 2/3 of classes in grade school/early university as mainly focused on rote learning and 1/3 where the rote knowledge is assumed and you have to solve more creative problems using that knowledge to get any marks. In the more advanced classes of university the latter is more common.

  4. #54
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
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    I can see Xavier's p.o.v.. I guess it highly depends on our value system/how we were raised.. I grew up poor. Money was never an option for bribery. Bringing home good grades was always something to be 'expected.' It was all tough-love.

    Growing up, I never even got a single praise for bringing home straight A's from my mom. Whenever I did, she would glare at me and say, "That's what you're Supposed to DO!" Even if she would have bribed me with money, I probably wouldn't accept it because when I earn my A's, it's usually because I thoroughly enjoy the subject. Heck, nowadays, whenever she offers me money, I rarely accept it. I'd just feel too guilty (not unless it's for traditional gift-giving holidays). Other than that, I just can't (not unless if I really really need it).

    Besides, taking money from another person actually makes me feel inferior. It's like the master-slave theory. I choose to live my life my own way. If I were to soley depend on her for my everything, I wouldn't quite live an own authentic life, because beyond the acceptance holds issues of expectations/conforming to others' wishes/desires.

  5. #55
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    I haven't read but the OP and the post I quote below, so maybe I'm repeating something already said.

    I don't see anything negative with paying kids to get good grades. Sure, one could argue that being a good student is for the kid's own good, but it really isn't necessary for the kid to get high grades in every single subject. Actually it isn't necessary for the kid to get good grades to most of the subjects, but the ones that interest them and at an advanced level and older age.

    So if parents are expecting their children to get high grades, they're actually expecting them to do a job and all jobs should be paid. More motivation and more self confidence for the child, because they have a reason to work and get good grades, it's not just that their parents force them. And a bit more reason to parents' expectations from their children.

    Quote Originally Posted by Viv View Post
    I can see Xavier's p.o.v.. I guess it highly depends on our value system/how we were raised.. I grew up poor. Money was never an option for bribery. Bringing home good grades was always something to be 'expected.' It was all tough-love.
    Money was not an option for me either (not that anyone did care about my grades, anyway), but I believe the value to pay someone to do their best is a good value. Especially for subjects the kids aren't interested at. To do an effort on something you don't care about has to have a reward.

  6. #56
    movin melodies kiddykat's Avatar
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    Good point. I didn't read the other posts other than the OP's either & the one above.. :blushing: If I repeat something that's already been said, then my bad..

    IMHO It boils down to intrinsic/extrinsic values & personal rewards. One could gain strong work ethics from getting paid for good grades (which can then develop into an internal value), but may lose core importance for education if the rewards are persistently external. One can also gain deeper values for education for the sake of learning as their own personal rewards system without the financial gains, but may lose integral values for artificial compensation.

    One can also learn for the sake of learning for their own pure enjoyment/get paid for it if they wish to (and if their parents can afford to). In this case, they get the benefits of both worlds (if it's done without expectations to conform on their parents' behalf in other aspects of their lives- such as their genuine respect for their child's interests/true personality).

    Bottom line: It depends on the individuals values/lifestyle/upbringing. Not everyone has rich parents who can afford to pay them for good grades. If they do, then good for them. If they don't, then oh well.

  7. #57
    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Provided nothing else works, is it better to teach them to be motivated by something distasteful like money, or to allow them to cycle through their schooling unmotivated and do poorly?

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hmm View Post
    Provided nothing else works, is it better to teach them to be motivated by something distasteful like money, or to allow them to cycle through their schooling unmotivated and do poorly?
    The problem here is that people don't usually eat money.

    I think I would have benefited from getting paid for good grades. I don't think it's a bad idea, at all. I mean to get good grades is hard work, so shouldn't you get paid for your work?

  9. #59
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    I improved dramatically from the near bottom of the class to the near top during one exam back in the 8th grade. Part of the motivation was that my father had promised to buy me roller-skates if I should improve. When the time came to buy me the gift, he said he had changed his mind and he would buy them for me if I maintained that position during the next exam. It was a little heart-breaking and I dropped dramatically once more.

    I don't think kids should be necessarily paid in money for good grades but a physical reward when they're working hard goes a long way in both increasing their motivation and teaching them the invaluable relationship between hard work and reward.

  10. #60
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uberfuhrer View Post
    The problem here is that people don't usually eat money.

    I think I would have benefited from getting paid for good grades. I don't think it's a bad idea, at all. I mean to get good grades is hard work, so shouldn't you get paid for your work?
    Exactly. That's your child's career. People work because they get money. Why shouldn't kids learn about money and the value of working hard over a long period of time for it?

    My dad sat me down, and explained how I should use money and the value of it, once I someday work at a job and receive it. I think I would have been a bit better with it (albeit I was better than most kids my age) if I learned it in a more literal way.
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