User Tag List

First 12345 Last

Results 21 to 30 of 74

  1. #21
    You are what you love themightyfetus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    MBTI
    ESFJ
    Enneagram
    3w2 so/sx
    Socionics
    ESE Si
    Posts
    2,626

    Default

    English has always been my favorite by far. The English teachers were the ones who actually had a clue about what was going on in my life. Consequently, I was sent to guidance a lot.

    Math has brought me to tears. It baffles me how numbers can have such a powerful effect on my mood.
    Yet I know, if I stepped aside
    Released the controls, you would open my eyes
    That somehow, all of this mess
    Is just my attempt to know the worth of my life
    .

    Mercury - Sleeping At Last

    3w2 // 6w7 // 9w1
    Likes Punderstorm liked this post

  2. #22
    climb on Showbread's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    MBTI
    ESFJ
    Enneagram
    3w2 so/sp
    Posts
    2,323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by themightyfetus View Post

    Math has brought me to tears. It baffles me how numbers can have such a powerful effect on my mood.
    I relate SO much.

    I have always absolutely hated math. I've cried over math homework an embarrassing number of times. I just never found it interesting, numbers feel very empty and boring to me. Especially compared to history or literature which are full of people and events. I have ADHD, so focussing on things I don't find interesting is extremely difficult for me. This made math class excruciating because I would get bored, drift off, then come back and have no idea what we were talking about, get frustrated, then give up. This pattern has repeated itself for pretty much my entire education. To make matters worse, being a 3 I really hate doing things I'm bad at in front of others. Math class was generally a place of failure and humiliation.

    I've always loved giving presentations and pretty much anything related to communication/verbal skills. Before college I would say English was probably my favorite, even though I'm awful with grammar.
    Friends, waffles, work

    "The problem is, when you depend on a substitute for love, you can never get enough" - Louis Cozolino

    3w2 6w7 1w2
    *Gryffindor*

    Likes themightyfetus, Punderstorm liked this post

  3. #23
    AK Video's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    MBTI
    ISFP
    Enneagram
    4w5 sx/sp
    Socionics
    ESI Fi
    Posts
    3,029

    Default

    English: Very good at it, but I didn't see it that way because I was personally invested and expected perfection from myself. Could not stand to make mistakes.

    Creative writing: The good part of English. At a certain point in one class, I could just turn in anything I felt like writing, whether related to the assignments or not, and it wouldn't bring down my 110+ grade.

    Math: No. Except for statistics and geometry. Once it became too abstract to apply visuals to the learning, it was over. Calculus in particular never even began to make sense.

    Science: This one brought the most tears. I was very interested and found the subjects beautiful in theory, but just not good at them, especially the more they intersected with math and as they became more theoretical in ways that defied tactile representation. I gave it my best but burned out messily.

    History: It was boring until I met an ENTP teacher in high school who made it one of my favorite subjects by emphasizing a narrative feel and infusing it with a dark sense of humor. Never lost interest again.

    Art: Much like English. Good at it, yet took it personally and died over every failure. Silently seethed in envy over/crushed on one other student in particular, a comparatively uninhibited 4w3 sx.

    Sports: Was not confident enough when I was young to get anywhere with these. I am way more coordinated now as a healthier adult. For the longest time, I thought I wasn't an athletic type, but really just didn't believe in myself enough to know myself.
    4w3 6w5 1w2 sx/sp ISFP

    RLOAX (don't do it)
    Melancholic Hufflepuff
    A lonely island where only what is permitted to move moves, becomes an ideal. Jung

    Kiss Kiss [johari] Bang Bang [nohari]

  4. #24
    Sweet Summer Child yama's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    MBTI
    ISFJ
    Enneagram
    2w1 so/sp
    Posts
    7,049

    Default

    I'm with @themightyfetus and @Showbread on math. I get so frustrated with math so quickly. It just doesn't click and made me cry a lot. I remember in my high school woodworking class the teacher gave us an assignment where we had to add and subtract fractions and I had a breakdown because I just did not understand at all. And the way schools push math nowadays, it's like if you don't understand it they treat you like you're stupid.
    @Nixie -- creative writing was one of my favorites!! It's soooo much more interesting than regular old boring English classes! So much more freedom, imagination and fun!!
    Likes themightyfetus, Punderstorm liked this post

  5. #25

    Default

    Why so many people don't like math? For me it were the most inspiring classes. It wasn't about memorizing things but about solving puzzles. Who doesn't like that?
    My second favourite was chemistry. But I also liked very much literature and philosophy classess.

    I never liked history. The only interesting part was why something happened, but to remember what and when... not so easy
    “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes." A.C. Doyle



  6. #26
    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    MBTI
    NP
    Enneagram
    964 sp/sx
    Posts
    6,847

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kas View Post
    Why so many people don't like math? For me it were the most inspiring classes. It wasn't about memorizing things but about solving puzzles. Who doesn't like that?
    My second favourite was chemistry. But I also liked very much literature and philosophy classess.

    I never liked history. The only interesting part was why something happened, but to remember what and when... not so easy
    Right!? I always liked math, never really liked the homework parts of it and generally avoided it as best as I could, but on the whole I thought that math was pretty interesting. It really does depend on how it is taught though, if you are stuck in a class where you are just given formulas to blanketly use to solve problems then sure math can be a chore and you will probably not be able to retain much or really further your understanding needed for more advanced math.

    But I had one guy who would explain the history behind all of the math terms, what each of the formulas meant, and why you used a certain method as opposed to another. Math can be really cool when you actually try to understand it wholly instead of of just blatantly accepting what you are told and then just plugging and chugging. Anyone can understand math, it just generally is not taught right in schools.

    Loved philosophy, loved psychology, disliked creative writing (Just the way it was taught, the teacher who taught it would have these dramatic crying fits weekly where she would talk about how she was going to burn in hell and how she was going to die alone and how her father used to hit her with beer bottles and stuff like that and I would always get sent to the office for laughing, sounds bad but I mean if you saw her...), loved chemistry, marketing, and I loved spanish.

    I hated gym though. I never really understood why I had to take it, it wasn't like I was completely enoromous or anything and I needed it for my health. And the standards seemed as if they were based off of the performance of the incredible hulk, 50 pushups? No thanks, I can maybe do 2. Aerobics was the worst because we had to do all these different complicated poses that I could never do. I forgot my gym clothes on a near daily basis because he had a rule that if you didnt bring them then you couldn't participate.

    Honestly though if I have kids I most likely would not put them in public schools. Too much emphasis is placed on quantity of information instead of quality. I would like to let them purse whatever they were interested in and explore it along side them. Homeschooling is just so much better, you can really go in depth and focus so much more on the individual and help to turn those gears.

  7. #27
    Meta Hard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    MBTI
    ENFJ
    Enneagram
    1w2 sp/so
    Socionics
    EIE Fe
    Posts
    7,613

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kas View Post
    Why so many people don't like math? For me it were the most inspiring classes. It wasn't about memorizing things but about solving puzzles. Who doesn't like that?
    My second favourite was chemistry. But I also liked very much literature and philosophy classess.

    I never liked history. The only interesting part was why something happened, but to remember what and when... not so easy
    I for one, hate puzzles. They can solve themselves.
    MBTI: ExxJ tetramer
    Functions: Fe > Te > Ni > Se > Si > Ti > Fi > Ne
    Enneagram: 1w2 - 3w4 - 6w5 (The Taskmaster) | sp/so
    Socionics: β-E dimer | -
    Big 5: slOaI
    Temperament: Choleric/Melancholic
    Alignment: Lawful Neutral
    External Perception: Nohari and Johari

    Likes Showbread, yama liked this post

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kas View Post
    Why so many people don't like math? For me it were the most inspiring classes. It wasn't about memorizing things but about solving puzzles. Who doesn't like that?
    My second favourite was chemistry. But I also liked very much literature and philosophy classess.

    I never liked history. The only interesting part was why something happened, but to remember what and when... not so easy
    The problem I had was a focus on process vs. results. I'm a guru at anything involving writing becuase the mental "algorithm" I have for writing is pretty much perfect -- just gather the facts your class is asking for, plug them into the writing formula, and you've produced a paper.


    Math classes require you to learn several processes very quickly and apply them to brief instances involving little information. You can't think creatively in numbers unless you have an expertise in them. You can't develop expertise because the classes don't go very in-depth about how to apply each formula or technique into a broad range of real-world scenarios -- they touch on a formula, drill you through a list of problems, and move on to the next process, all far too quickly for comfort. There's nothing "scientific" about it -- it's like making you do push-ups and then telling everyone you're automatically a soldier. You can't retain knowledge for long unless there's a meaning tied to it. A number has no meaning -- it's a quantity. Nothing more.


    You can't solve a puzzle when there's too little general knowledge on which to brainstorm.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Frosty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    MBTI
    NP
    Enneagram
    964 sp/sx
    Posts
    6,847

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cygnus View Post
    The problem I had was a focus on process vs. results. I'm a guru at anything involving writing becuase the mental "algorithm" I have for writing is pretty much perfect -- just gather the facts your class is asking for, plug them into the writing formula, and you've produced a paper.


    Math classes require you to learn several processes very quickly and apply them to brief instances involving little information. You can't think creatively in numbers unless you have an expertise in them. You can't develop expertise because the classes don't go very in-depth about how to apply each formula or technique into a broad range of real-world scenarios -- they touch on a formula, drill you through a list of problems, and move on to the next process, all far too quickly for comfort. There's nothing "scientific" about it -- it's like making you do push-ups and then telling everyone you're automatically a soldier. You can't retain knowledge for long unless there's a meaning tied to it. A number has no meaning -- it's a quantity. Nothing more.


    You can't solve a puzzle when there's too little general knowledge on which to brainstorm.
    What about classes like statistics which answers are generally open to more interpretation? If math is taught in a way where the reasoning behind what exactly the basis is for solving a certain problem is made clear, as in it is taught more in the way one would tell a story, do you think that would make math more appealing? It seems that so many people struggle with math, I myself did not like algebra not because I couldn't do it but because it was taught in a way where as long as you could remember what the teacher told you to do, you never really had to understand what you were actually doing. If the calculator is doing the work, then your brain is not. Anyway, do you think there is some sort of way to improve the way math is taught in schools, and change peoples perception of math in general, without losing the groups that really 'learn' by rote memorization and applied formulas?

  10. #30

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty6226 View Post
    What about classes like statistics which answers are generally open to more interpretation? If math is taught in a way where the reasoning behind what exactly the basis is for solving a certain problem is made clear, as in it is taught more in the way one would tell a story, do you think that would make math more appealing? It seems that so many people struggle with math, I myself did not like algebra not because I couldn't do it but because it was taught in a way where as long as you could remember what the teacher told you to do, you never really had to understand what you were actually doing. If the calculator is doing the work, then your brain is not. Anyway, do you think there is some sort of way to improve the way math is taught in schools, and change peoples perception of math in general, without losing the groups that really 'learn' by rote memorization and applied formulas?
    Calculators should be prohibited from the more basic of arithmetic equations. You should learn to multiply and long-divide large numbers in your head. In the wild, there is no paper and pencil.



    Curriculum should have a greater focus on actively associating each individual technique and scenario with multiple instances of real-world application, an understanding of how the problems are used and why logic dictates that they function this way, otherwise the techniques will inevitably fade from student memory upon even slight disuse. All learning is by Association. Association must have meaning.





    You know why we're typing right now on computers, right? We were taught how to write. We only gained ability to write lucratively when we understood the meanings behind all words said, all comparisons drawn, all abstractions made. All of these things are tied to words we learned to associate with objects or ideas, not because we chose to, but because the stimulus was constant, because we needed to identify everything in order to understand everything.


    Similarly, you can't take mathematics to a higher level unless the students are regularly practicing every technique as commonly as we practice speaking and writing in daily life. To do this, we must be directed and trained how to associate higher and higher types of equation with broader and broader fields of problems. Once we learn how to apply equations to scenarios, we can learn to figure out to associate new equations to new problems in new ways, and mathematics will indeed become like a language.
    Ditto for Physics.
    Likes Kas, Punderstorm liked this post

Quick Reply Quick Reply

  • :hi:
  • :bye:
  • :)
  • :hug:
  • :happy2:
  • :smile:
  • :wubbie:
  • :D
  • :wink:
  • ;)
  • :newwink:
  • :(
  • :cry:
  • :mad:
  • :dry:
  • :doh:
  • :shock:
  • :huh:
  • :shrug:
  • :blush:

Similar Threads

  1. what core subjecs would you have in school?
    By Zergling in forum The Bonfire
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-23-2016, 09:43 PM
  2. [ISFP] What were/are you like in school?
    By Quinlan in forum The SP Arthouse (ESFP, ISFP, ESTP, ISTP)
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 03-03-2009, 12:38 PM
  3. Taxes and the Middle Class in America
    By Samuel De Mazarin in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 08-24-2008, 12:40 PM
  4. [NT] How well did/do you do in school?
    By The Ü™ in forum The NT Rationale (ENTP, INTP, ENTJ, INTJ)
    Replies: 125
    Last Post: 08-20-2008, 01:40 AM
  5. Giftedness in school
    By Splittet in forum Politics, History, and Current Events
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: 08-13-2008, 05:06 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO