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  1. #1
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Default common core: kids must know how read to leave kindergarten

    Report: Requiring kindergartners to read — as Common Core does — may harm some - The Washington Post

    what do you think about this? me I don't like I didn't learn how to read til end of first grade or beginning of second but once I did I caught up with my peers and even surpassed them and I ended up being a child that would get in trouble for reading til 3/4 am when I was suppose to be sleeping on school nights. and first 6 months probably drove everyone in the cars nuts as i insisted on reading every sign we passed out loud especially to and from school so they probably heard the same ads from me at least 5 times a week

    The Common Core State Standards call for kindergartners to learn how to read, but a new report by early childhood experts says that forcing some kids to read before they are ready could be harmful.

    Two organizations that advocate for early childhood education — Defending the Early Years and Alliance for Childhood — issued the report titled “Reading in Kindergarten: Little to Gain and Much to Lose.” It says there is no evidence to support a widespread belief in the United States that children must read in prekindergarten or kindergarten to become strong readers and achieve academic success.

    The authors — Nancy Carlsson-Paige, Geralyn Bywater McLaughlin and Joan Wolfsheimer Almon — found that:

    Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten, yet the Common Core State Standards require them to do just that. This is leading to inappropriate classroom practices.
    No research documents long-term gains from learning to read in kindergarten.
    Research shows greater gains from play-based programs than from preschools and kindergartens with a more academic focus.
    Children learn through playful, hands-on experiences with materials, the natural world, and engaging, caring adults.
    Active, play-based experiences in language-rich environments help children develop their ideas about symbols, oral language and the printed word — all vital components of reading.
    We are setting unrealistic reading goals and frequently using inappropriate methods to accomplish them.
    In play-based kindergartens and preschools, teachers intentionally design language and literacy experiences which help prepare children to become fluent readers.
    The adoption of the Common Core State Standards falsely implies that having children achieve these standards will overcome the impact of poverty on development and learning, and will create equal educational opportunity for all children.

    The report says that kindergarten has since the 1980s become increasingly academic — with big pushes from President George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind and President Obama’s Race to the Top — and that today many children are being asked to do things they are not ready to do. It says:

    Under the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) the snowball has escalated into an avalanche which threatens to destroy appropriate and effective approaches to early education. The kindergarten standards, in use in over 40 states, place huge emphasis on print literacy and state bluntly that, by the end of kindergarten, children are to “read emergent-reader texts with purpose and understanding.” Large amounts of time and money are being devoted to this goal, and its impact is felt strongly in many preschools as well.

    Many children are not developmentally ready to read in kindergarten. In addition, the pressure of implementing the standards leads many kindergarten teachers to resort to inappropriate didactic methods combined with frequent testing. Teacher-led instruction in kindergartens has almost entirely replaced the active, play-based, experiential learning that we know children need from decades of research in cognitive and developmental psychology and neuroscience.

    When children have educational experiences that are not geared to their developmental level or in tune with their learning needs and cultures, it can cause them great harm, including feelings of inadequacy, anxiety and confusion. A grandmother from Massachusetts told this story:

    My 5-year-old grandson adored his play-based preschool, but it was a different story when he started an all-day, very academic, public kindergarten. From the first day he had mostly worksheets and table tasks, which he said were “hard.” On the fifth day of kindergarten he refused to go to school, locked himself in his bedroom, and hid under his bed!

    Here from the report are some examples from the Core that the authors cite as inappropriate for many kindergartners:

    The CCSS website states, “Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each year’s grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.” However, there is no evidence that mastering these standards in kindergarten rather than in first grade brings lasting gains. To achieve them usually calls for long hours of drill and worksheets — and reduces other vital areas of learning such as math, science, social
    studies, art, music and creative play.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  2. #2
    Senior Member Ene's Avatar
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    I think many, probably most, teachers I know would agree with the article.

    Unfortunately, the ones setting these policies specialize in government, not brain, emotional or social development. And sadly, some of the writers of these standards have absolutely NO background in early childhood development. They know how to write policies, but not how to address the child as a "whole" person. They only take into consideration part of the variables that go into early childhood learning.

    The policy makers' main concerns weren't really students or their families. Their concerns were far more political than that.

    Thank you for sharing this article.
    A student said to his master: "You teach me fighting, but you talk about peace. How do you reconcile the two?" The master replied: "It is better to be a warrior in a garden than to be a gardener in a war." - unknown/Chinese

    http://www.typologycentral.com/forum...=61024&page=14
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  3. #3
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    This one of the unfortunate situations where science has no say or claim. Science can say all day long play is the most important part of education in a child's life, and no one gives a hoot. Parents want their kids smart to the point they lack patience, and schools are trying to look like they're doing something instead of telling misguided people to fuck off and do things the way that actually works and let those people come back with real evidence otherwise.

    Compound this issue with the absolutely ridiculous "after sept 1st they have to wait an entire extra year for school" rule and you've got a recipe for feelings of shame and inadequacy in the child. And people wonder why I'm all for private and charter schools now a days.
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    Likes prplchknz, Hard, Ene, Redbone liked this post

  4. #4
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    (did not read article)

    One of my smartest children did not read nor write until he was 9. We homeschooled.

    I really think the days of the one room schoolhouse were better. When kids were in a class with all ages and they focused on the core things, like reading, writing, arithmetic, and history with a heavy emphasis on memorization, spelling, etc.

    We live in a goal-oriented, power hungry, success-driven, sexual-minded society, so having unrealistic expectations for our kids is just a part of our culture perhaps. Thing is, I doubt teachers or parents really want it to be so demanding on the kids. It seems to be more of a bureaucratic issue?
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  5. #5
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ene View Post
    I think many, probably most, teachers I know would agree with the article.

    Unfortunately, the ones setting these policies specialize in government, not brain, emotional or social development. And sadly, some of the writers of these standards have absolutely NO background in early childhood development. They know how to write policies, but not how to address the child as a "whole" person. They only take into consideration part of the variables that go into early childhood learning.

    The policy makers' main concerns weren't really students or their families. Their concerns were far more political than that.

    Thank you for sharing this article.
    yeah I had lot of shame in childhood cuz of expectations to be able to read and probably even more if i had been kept in kindergarten til almost 8
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  6. #6
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kyuuei View Post
    This one of the unfortunate situations where science has no say or claim. Science can say all day long play is the most important part of education in a child's life, and no one gives a hoot. Parents want their kids smart to the point they lack patience, and schools are trying to look like they're doing something instead of telling misguided people to fuck off and do things the way that actually works and let those people come back with real evidence otherwise.

    Compound this issue with the absolutely ridiculous "after sept 1st they have to wait an entire extra year for school" rule and you've got a recipe for feelings of shame and inadequacy in the child. And people wonder why I'm all for private and charter schools now a days.
    I get our education system sucks but you'd think policy makers would listen to the researchers and be like ok soooo lets listen to them. I think that would be better I mean work on improving the learning enviroments but instead of forcing everyone to learn stuff they're not ready for at 6 like i said didn't read til almost 8 now i have a higher vocabulary and a faster reader naturally than most people i know. i didn't fail highschool because i didn't learn how to read in kindergarten
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    We live in an SJ dominated, goal-oriented, power hungry, success-driven society, so having unrealistic expectations for our kids is just a part of our culture perhaps. Thing is, I doubt teachers or parents really want it to be so demanding on the kids. It seems to be more of a bureaucratic issue?
    I have no intention of derailing into some shitstorm here, but this whole Keirseyen gerrymandered SJ category is fallacious. Se (and, to a lesser, more specified extent, Te) is the function more tightly associated with competition, striving for success, and power than is Si. Si is about being at a resting state, not "conformity" and certainly not physical power or ambition.

    If you look into Socionics you'll see Se-dominants characterized by remarkable willpower and farsightedness while Si/Ne types tend to be more indolent and/or given to analysis paralysis.
    There's even a Reinin dichotomy Decisive vs. Judicious defined expressly by Se/Ni vs. Ne/Si respectively; all Se/Ni types, SP or NJ, are Decisive: they waste little time making decisions and prefer to complete tasks from start to finish with little planning, their natural state is in motion (don't confuse this with Farsighted vs. Carefree which is about regard to future goals vs. focus on the present); SJ/NP types are Judicious and put much more emphasis on the planning stages before taking action, often dividing up tasks into segmented periods marked by intervals of rest.


    If anything, "power-hungry, success-driven" culture is marked by Se, and in more extreme cases Se - Te (Gamma Quadra).

  8. #8
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    Oh wow. Yes! Thanks for calling me out on that . That was a completely habitual and rote, and, as you pointed out, fallacious statement made by myself! I hate that I got drawn into that thinking at all.

    You really know your stuff.
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    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by AphroditeGoneAwry View Post
    Oh wow. Yes! Thanks for calling me out on that . That was a completely habitual and rote, and, as you pointed out, fallacious statement made by myself! I hate that I got drawn into that thinking at all.

    You really know your stuff.
    Is this sarcasm? I had no intention of being insulting, if you'll forgive me.

  10. #10
    failure to thrive AphroditeGoneAwry's Avatar
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    No.

    And you were not insulting.
    Ni/Ti/Fe/Si
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    The more one loves God, the more it is that having nothing in the world means everything, and the less one loves God, the more it is that having everything in the world means nothing.

    Do not resist an evil person, but to him who strikes you on the one cheek, offer also the other. ~Matthew 5:39

    songofmary.wordpress.com


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