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  1. #11
    Google "chemtrails" Bush Did 9/11's Avatar
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    The terminology makes the parents feel special, for sure. And kids are so malleable that terminology plays a role in their self-image, too.

    'Gifted' is hard to define. Not in a Kumbaya sort of way, either. It's just way too general to be meaningful.

    It ought to be broken down further. Offer second grade-level reading periods for first graders who excel at reading, or advanced high school courses in calculus that offer college credit. Lots of districts take that approach, and it's more palatable.
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  2. #12
    Wake, See, Sing, Dance Cellmold's Avatar
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    I wasn't in a gifted program, but I did enjoy my "dangerous and unpredictable behaviour unsuitable for normal classrooms" classes.
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  3. #13
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
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    I wasn't in a gifted program when I was a kid, because I went to a very small private K-8 school where everyone got a lot of individual attention. That was GREAT for me. In a way I think it functioned as a gifted program, because almost all of us (in my graduating class of 12 people) ended up taking AP courses together when we got to high school. I'm almost certain that if I hadn't had that individual attention, and if the school hadn't pushed me intellectually, I would have acted out a lot more than I did. (I was an insufferably arrogant child -- if a teacher wasn't "smarter than me", then I'd lose respect for them and make their lives more difficult.) I certainly wouldn't have cared as much about my schoolwork, and wouldn't have learned as much as a result.



    Edit: It's worth mentioning that there was another benefit to having that individual attention, besides the fact that it challenged me intellectually. Every single one of my teachers made a point of connecting what they were teaching us to the real world. In math class, we studied the Pyramids, and the appearance of fractals in nature. Our English and History classes were combined into one class, where we did creative writing based on assigned historical fiction reading. IMO this is the sort of thing that all kids, "gifted" or otherwise, can benefit from.
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  4. #14
    Google "chemtrails" Bush Did 9/11's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    I wasn't in a gifted program when I was a kid, because I went to a very small private K-8 school where everyone got a lot of individual attention. That was GREAT for me. In a way I think it functioned as a gifted program, because almost all of us (in my graduating class of 12 people) ended up taking AP courses together when we got to high school. I'm almost certain that if I hadn't had that individual attention, and if the school hadn't pushed me intellectually, I would have acted out a lot more than I did. (I was an insufferably arrogant child -- if a teacher wasn't "smarter than me", then I'd lose respect for them and make their lives more difficult.) I certainly wouldn't have cared as much about my schoolwork, and wouldn't have learned as much as a result.

    Edit: It's worth mentioning that there was another benefit to having that individual attention, besides the fact that it challenged me intellectually. Every single one of my teachers made a point of connecting what they were teaching us to the real world. In math class, we studied the Pyramids, and the appearance of fractals in nature. Our English and History classes were combined into one class, where we did creative writing based on assigned historical fiction reading. IMO this is the sort of thing that all kids, "gifted" or otherwise, can benefit from.
    That's freaking cool. I want to see if I can get my kid the same deal when he comes of age.
    J. Scott Crothers
    aka "Bush Did 9/11"
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  5. #15
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    I don't know. I know my brother was in optional in elementary school, and on top of that clue. he was one of those kids that if he got bored he'd cause problems and i could see him getting into way more trouble if he was in a non-gifted program. so perhaps that aspect is good. one day after school him and his friends bought feeder mice and popsicle sticks and built an obstacle course/tree house for them out of the 3rd floor window and realeased them into the course. my mom freaked out I don't remember this. I was I think 11 (so he would've been 13) and my mom told the story recently and i told her that I didn't remember that. and she was like I remember it.
    In no likes experiment.

    that is all

    i dunno what else to say so

  6. #16
    this is my winter song EJCC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jscrothers View Post
    That's freaking cool. I want to see if I can get my kid the same deal when he comes of age.
    I hope you can -- it was freaking awesome.

    The only real downside was the middle school part of it. Imagine a class of 13 kids forming cliques and starting to date each other.
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  7. #17
    Paranoid Android Video's Avatar
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    I've got nothing. True to complaints about underdeveloped gifted programs, my school told me I was in it, but absolutely nothing changed about my classes and coursework. I've been in a few elevated classes because i chose them of my own accord, but mostly mixed - just like most of my peers. My lack of confidence might also have held me back and discouraged instructors from placing too much challenge on my shoulders, although the best ones saw through that, and I thrived disproportionately in their classes. I don't believe that intelligence constitutes a gift on its own. It needs a backbone of emotional discipline to balance it and make it work.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member paisley1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nixie View Post
    I've got nothing. True to complaints about underdeveloped gifted programs, my school told me I was in it, but absolutely nothing changed about my classes and coursework. I've been in a few elevated classes because i chose them of my own accord, but mostly mixed - just like most of my peers. My lack of confidence might also have held me back and discouraged instructors from placing too much challenge on my shoulders, although the best ones saw through that, and I thrived disproportionately in their classes. I don't believe that intelligence constitutes a gift on its own. It needs a backbone of emotional discipline to balance it and make it work.
    Totally agree with you! Well said Nixie!

    Not just intelligence and emotional discipline, but the type of intelligence and the type of emotional discipline, makes a huge difference to a persons development. Different approach for different folks. A person with excellent spatial reasoning and eye-hand coordination that's going to enter the trades needs a different type of intellectual and emotional development than a kid who has literary and creative strengths. I suppose getting like minded children together to help them focus would foster a sense of belonging and develop their sense of self worth, hopefully without pitting such divisive groups against each other and not creating unwanted clicks.
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  9. #19
    Theta Male Julius_Van_Der_Beak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lexicon View Post
    My experiences in gifted student programs were always positive. The class size was smaller, which was less hyper-stimulating for me. I felt constantly challenged/motivated. A few kids would jeer at students in either the accelerated or the slow classes, but kids find any reason to pick on one another. Having a combination of 'blended' courses (P.E., music, art, health, etc) - gave us an opportunity to interact & work together with everyone on the same level. Overall, I feel like the experience benefited my education (& my psychological development) more than anything else.
    Same here. If we get rid of them, can we get rid of varsity sports, too?
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  10. #20
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
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    Mine was pretty negative. I got out of the program in high school. I actually had VERY positive results with the G&TP all through elementary and middle school, and I was in it so early that I just didn't notice it was any different from normal school.

    Until I got to high school.

    I think a lot of this was the teachers I had, honestly. They were wretched ladies that just hated their jobs and it was plain as day. I couldn't get out of their class into another class unless I quit the program.. but they piled unnecessary amounts of homework on us, and during my freshman year the first 2/3rds of the year I was up until midnight doing homework, then waking up at 6am and doing it all over again. I ended up crying a few times over it, because I'd feel so bad to not complete homework and get a zero on it when I knew how to do it, I just didn't have time for it all.

    The situation that put it over the edge was one where I actually had trouble with an English assignment. My mother helped me, and we spent all night working on it and went to bed finally at 1:30am. The next day, she put it in my backpack herself to ensure I'd take it with me. I handed the paper in. I got a zero on it. The teacher claimed I never turned it in. I told my mom what happened, and mother went up there to explain that I absolutely did the assignment and brought it to school with me. The teacher pretty much did a "I'm not calling you a liar.. but you're lying." My father went up to the school. My paper magically appeared the next day. My dad always had a way with words and getting things done. It was the military in him.

    Anyways, that teacher scrutinized my work from that day on, wouldn't leave me alone, and I needed English to go on to the next grade level. I was actually going to be held back because of this teacher. The teacher had tenure, and pretty much nothing could be done to her, so the school counselor asked if I wanted to drop to on-level classes to complete the semester and whatever grade I made in there he'd apply to the school year for me. I took that opportunity... and I actually learned more in on-level classes. They were a slower pace, which bored me to death, but I had time to DO all of the work without rushing it and memory-dumping everything. I could enjoy spanish class, and take a science class that didn't help my future at all but expanded my mind. I could actually participate in history class, and ask questions, instead of feverishly writing everything down. Those advanced-level teachers acted like that shit was life-or-death.. and while I understand ramping kids up for college... I was still 14 years old and just coming into high school.

    TLDR: I think they're great, and I would encourage them despite the fact I had a terrible experience with them in high school when they arguably mattered a bit more. If I were a parent, I'd push for it, but I'd also be receptive to the fact that it might be more encouraging for a kid's education overall to make decent grades without so much struggle in on-level classes versus being a zombie in advanced special sexy classes.
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