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  1. #21
    Member foxonstilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nicodemus View Post
    I got two out of ten of the worst. Who can beat me?
    I've got two out of ten as well. One of which is the top worst to have (and I have two degrees in that field!)

    Do I get a prize? No? Crippling despair? Oh, I have enough already, thanks.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Nicodemus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxonstilts View Post
    I've got two out of ten as well. One of which is the top worst to have (and I have two degrees in that field!)

    Do I get a prize? No? Crippling despair? Oh, I have enough already, thanks.
    You win. For now!

  3. #23
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Haha, I have my degree in political science, so, meh. Previously, I was aiming for the number 3, but now I can do most of the programming stuff on my own time, while learning more of the theoretical stuff researching online.

    The top 10 is usually accurate. There are still some uses for most degrees, it just depends on how you are going to use them that makes the biggest difference. Even an archaeologist/anthropologist can make some big bucks going into forensics, which is in par with most of those top 10 degrees.

    English is still in demand for most of the world, even though teaching, especially English, might be overabundant in places like the US and UK, there are still a lot of programs and governments overseas that are willing to pay a decent wage for one to live at their place. As a side bonus, you get to be place smack-dabbed in the middle of another country and get the chance to learn their language and culture. That makes it an easy route for some people to get a degree in English or ESL.

    But I digress

  4. #24
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kullervo View Post
    I can imagine many research projects in demand for biochemists (molecular biology, such as genetics)
    Yeah, but you normally need a PhD to get access to those, and research funding is heavily volatile. Considering the amount of work you need to put into getting a degree in such field, I believe the ratio job security + pay / effort is way too low.

    and geologists (anything earth/environment related).
    AFAIK civil engineers are always preferred over geologists for those kind of jobs, and the latter often works as an "assistant" to civil engineers. The exception being those geologists working for oil companies, but not everyone is cut out for that.


    Like you maybe, I was surprised that medicine and law weren't mentioned, but perhaps there is an oversupply of young graduates in these professions.
    Law took a big hit after the "financial" crisis of 2008. Medicine is surprising, perhaps the cost of such degree is way too high in the US.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  5. #25
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EJCC View Post
    . Even work study jobs doing data entry for the admissions office will count as office experience later on.
    To be completely honest, I know this philosophy is fairly widespread among employers but I think it's fundamentally wrong. I learnt far more during an insurance / financia modeling 3 months course than during years of data-entry like work. As long as college courses have at least 50% of a "practical" bent, they can be far more valuable than work experience.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  6. #26
    Senior Member wildflower's Avatar
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    i don't think it makes sense to pick a major based solely on what is practical i.e. money-making or solely on one's passion. a bit of both depending on the particular industry and the current economic climate is necessary. just because one industry is hot now doesn't mean it will be in 15 years so making a purely practical decision can leave you miserable in the future. of course, if you go into the fine arts it may well be hit or miss so you have to make sure you have a way to eat. overall, i think it is smart to pursue your passion even if that only happens as a side endeavor to a 9-5 job in a related field if possible. squelching your passions is a good recipe for unhappiness. as @Jaguar said entrepreneurship is a great way to go too. i come from an extended family of successful entrepreneurs. they all worked very hard but got to be their own bosses doing things they loved.

  7. #27
    Member foxonstilts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rail Tracer View Post
    Even an archaeologist/anthropologist can make some big bucks going into forensics, which is in par with most of those top 10 degrees.
    Unfortunately, that is like the most oversaturated field in anthropology right now (THANKS, BONES). And most states only have 2-3 forensic anthropologists, tops, and they're usually just called to consult rather than full-time workers. It's easier to get a job in arch as an osteologist (basically forensic anth but on archaeological remains) than it is forensics. JPAC-SIL is a huge full-time employer of forensic anth if you can get on there and move to Hawai'i, though.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Qre:us's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    To be completely honest, I know this philosophy is fairly widespread among employers but I think it's fundamentally wrong. I learnt far more during an insurance / financia modeling 3 months course than during years of data-entry like work. As long as college courses have at least 50% of a "practical" bent, they can be far more valuable than work experience.
    Where I live, there are two broad streams: colleges and universities. Colleges set you up for certification in an application-based field (generally), while, a lot of undergraduate courses in universities, are only just the first stepping stone. You need something *more* to really enter that field. Either a masters or, even, PhD. Unless the university degree is application based from the start (like Engineering, Computer Science, etc), all other university majors, as an undergraduate degree, are pretty useless in terms of translating to "hireability".

    Which is where the experience from internship, or doing an undergrad degree with a thesis component, or summer jobs that are aligned to that field, really help. Not just with giving one better prospect after graduating from undergraduate studies, but with admission to post-graduate studies.

    For example, a B.Sc. in Life Sciences from an university - what is that? What does that really prepare one for, in terms of skills to offer to the world? All the people I know who had that degree, chose it to have a clean, simple undergrad where they could better achieve higher GPA because their ultimate goal was med school.

    One must know what they're doing with their degree, and whether a degree from an university is even worth it - for their ultimate goal in life. If one has the funds, great, get a degree in Philosophy, but not all can afford to choose passion/interest over practicality. Then, there's also the issue that at that age, not everyone has a clear, long-term plan about their life all mapped out, or what the hell they'll do the next day, let alone for the rest of their life. I know I changed my major twice, because I was still figuring myself out. Until I finally settled on something "practical".....

    For that reason, my major for undergrad was something that prepared me for my postgrad education, and because I didn't want to compromise my interests, as well, all my electives, I used to get a minor in my field of interest (English). Having my cake and eating it too, so to speak....

    Then, there are people, one even a friend of mine (much older but we were classmates), who are perpetual students. Getting one degree after the other, less-so for the sake of the degree and to enter the workforce, but more to just keep learning. It's commendable but not a realistic choice for everyone. My friend has an undergrad degree in a science-related field, a nursing degree, he is an MD, he also has a masters in another science-related field, then another PhD in the same field he got his masters, and is thinking about another PhD degree (Philosophy of Science or something). I don't even know........

  9. #29
    pathwise dependent FDG's Avatar
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    Of course, but I can't see how a data entry job could truly help your skill development regarding everything you say.
    ENTj 7-3-8 sx/sp

  10. #30
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by foxonstilts View Post
    Unfortunately, that is like the most oversaturated field in anthropology right now (THANKS, BONES). And most states only have 2-3 forensic anthropologists, tops, and they're usually just called to consult rather than full-time workers. It's easier to get a job in arch as an osteologist (basically forensic anth but on archaeological remains) than it is forensics. JPAC-SIL is a huge full-time employer of forensic anth if you can get on there and move to Hawai'i, though.
    Lol, I think that is why lawyer and medicine/doctor isn't up on that list because it is either over-saturated (lawyers), or it requires insurance/is really hard to get into (the last time i check, lots of doctors have to get insurance just in case a patient screams malpractice.) The ones that do make large amounts of money are few and far-between compared to the people who only make an average salary compared to the time, money, and effort put into the degree.

    Also, it seems that the amount an osteologist gets by being employed still seems quite decent compared to what Forbes is telling us about anthropologists.

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