User Tag List

Results 1 to 8 of 8

  1. #1
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default General Science and Algebra I/II books.

    So I am trying to keep the breadth of my knowledge from deteriorating any further (the things I've studied in college are soooooo variable.) I am looking for some general books sort of like high school books that I can use as a tool to relearn a lot of the stuff that I have sort of forgotten but vaguely remember what to do.

    Two textbooks that I really want are General Science and Algebra I/II textbooks.

    Topics that I want included for General Science would be something like ecology, biology, general physics, temperature and chemistry. Like a temperate forest versus a deciduous forest, terms like velocity and momentum, temperature conversion of C and F (probably don't need this) understanding chemical make-up of atoms (EX: H2O, HCL, CO2.... yada yada.)

    Topics that I want included in Algebra are linear algebra (like binomials,) graphs, and geometry.

    A lot of the stuff I vaguely remember, and I can't find any of my Algebra or Science books.... I only have Trigonometry and Calculus books. Won't help much.

  2. #2
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Maybe I am being a little cryptic on what I am asking for?

  3. #3
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,877

    Default

    I say previous edition community college textbooks are particularly useful. I'll give you a list of the ones I kept for their clarity and ease of reading when I get home.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  4. #4
    FigerPuppet
    Guest

    Default

    Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering: A Comprehensive Guide

    This is the economical choice for a comprehensive undergraduate mathematics textbook, which hitches onto and recapitulates US high school curriculum to give students the same baseline of knowledge before moving on to more advanced subjects. I used it myself in my first year of university for linear algebra and complex numbers. Excluding price, comprehensive guides are in general not as good as books written on a single subject, but they do a good enough job when you want to go over a broad range of related subjects and your starting point isn't advanced.

    An Introduction to Error Analysis: The Study of Uncertainties in Physical Measurements (aka The Bible)

    I know you didn't request anything related to statistical methods, but this is an easy-and-fun-to-read book that will teach you concepts that are absolutely priceless to any natural scientist. The book's teachings are at the core of the modern scientific method, and I definitely think it will be helpful to you even if you don't plan on going into any sciences.
    You can download the entire book here if you don't want to buy it without a preview.

  5. #5
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SmileyMan View Post
    Mathematical Methods for Physics and Engineering: A Comprehensive Guide

    This is the economical choice for a comprehensive undergraduate mathematics textbook, which hitches onto and recapitulates US high school curriculum to give students the same baseline of knowledge before moving on to more advanced subjects. I used it myself in my first year of university for linear algebra and complex numbers. Excluding price, comprehensive guides are in general not as good as books written on a single subject, but they do a good enough job when you want to go over a broad range of related subjects and your starting point isn't advanced.

    An Introduction to Error Analysis: The Study of Uncertainties in Physical Measurements (aka The Bible)

    I know you didn't request anything related to statistical methods, but this is an easy-and-fun-to-read book that will teach you concepts that are absolutely priceless to any natural scientist. The book's teachings are at the core of the modern scientific method, and I definitely think it will be helpful to you even if you don't plan on going into any sciences.
    You can download the entire book here if you don't want to buy it without a preview.
    Ohhh god..... that math book is expensive @.@.

  6. #6
    Emperor/Dictator kyuuei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    MBTI
    enfp
    Enneagram
    8
    Posts
    13,877

    Default

    Alright! Here's what I use in order from least to most expensive:

    - Free: Khan Academy and coursera and youtube. They're really awesome for basic math skills especially.

    https://www.khanacademy.org/ I especially like Khan Academy, they're really easy to use, and they have details and the way the 'courses' are set up are really easy--you can skip to sections you need to re-learn. I find it more beneficial than just a math book alone--and, you can always research questions online via google for practice quizzing, but they have some quizzes on the site I believe. I know coursera does that.

    Coursera has more structure to it, and lots of quizzes and professor-style assistance and help when you need it, so you can sign up for any number of classes and participate in them on a weekly basis.

    Youtube is great for specific questions--there are professors, students, and normal people that love this stuff teaching on there for free all the time. You look up how to calculate ABGs, they show you how to get it right every time without fail.

    - Cheap: Renting Amazon books.

    The Nutrition manuals from Amazon are great for brushing up on the basics of proteins, carbs and sugars, and vitamins and such. I liked this one a lot: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and it's only $15 for 60 days of rental. Enough to work through a chapter, write down the main points, and go on.
    That's just one example. You can rent textbooks on there all the time for 30-90 days for a fraction of the cost of a new textbook.

    - Cheap, but requires leg work: Previous edition textbooks.

    Go to your local college bookstore. Look at the books they have available for the classes they're teaching: biology, for example, or microbiology. Then, look up that author's previous editions. 1 edition or 2 back will MASSIVELY drop in price and be widely available because of the textbook market being a total mess. You can capitalize on this and get a $160 textbook for like $20-40 dollars because students won't be able to buy old editions.

    Textbooks that I love that I'm sure if they don't have new editions yet, they will soon:
    - Medical Terminology A living Language by Fremgen
    - Human Anatomy and Physiology by Maneb
    - Pathophysiology: A biological basis for disease in adults and children .. I have the 4th edition, but the 3rd edition has mostly correct information
    - Personal Nutrition by Boyle
    - Microbiology: With diseases by body system by Bauman

    - Less reliable but still cheap: Half Price Books
    They usually sell "X subject made easy!" books there, or CLEP study books which have the added benefit of having CDs sometimes, and they usually get straight to the main teaching points.

    - Expensive but affordable: The Kaplan MCAT crunch series and HESI exam study guides.

    After you've worked your way through some free online courses, you can always go to the local library for HESI books. You can buy them too, they're expensive, but they do a great job of teaching from the very bottom up, depending on how advanced you want to go--entrance HESI exam study guides are WAY easier than further editions for like the NCLEX or something.. So just browse through the different kinds.

    I highly recommend the entrance HESI because, while the math is far too easy in it, it does a very thorough job of teaching each section in its absolute basics. Physics, grammar, vocabulary, math.. it literally starts from addition and subtraction and works its way up the ladder. So if you're starting from zero with a subject, and they have it, it's a great place to start, and most colleges have it for free to rent for a few days at a time.

    The MCAT study books are pretty good too. I ordered them when I was determined to study to take the MCAT as a back up plan for nursing. I use this series for the basics of things, and I love it because it's really a summary of subjects in order. it doesn't go far into detail, it just refreshes the memory of what you were taught--if I get confused on a particular section, I can look it up on youtube, and then check the block and move on. And they have quizzy questions too.
    Kantgirl: Just say "I'm feminine and I'll punch anyone who says otherwise!"
    Halla74: Think your way through the world. Feel your way through life.

    Cimarron: maybe Prpl will be your girl-bud
    prplchknz: i don't like it

    In Search Of... ... Kiwi Sketch Art ... Dream Journal ... Kyuuei's Cook book ... Kyu's Tiny House Blog ... Minimalist Challenge ... Kyu's Savings Challenge

  7. #7
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    @kyuuei Just started messing around with khan academy, I might make it my go to source for math related studying. I will probably borrow a relative's book when it comes to biology and chemistry late May.

    But yes, I can look up on course schedules for beginning biology and chemistry and just buy those books. The bookstore doesn't care if you are in the course or not to buy the books.

  8. #8

    Default

    Khan Academy and corsera are good.

    There's a huge list of books I think are great. Dover publication republishes a lot of great cheap books(that Amazon often price cuts for Kindle versions)

    I also recommend:
    6 easy pieces
    6 not so easy pieces
    How to Solve it
    What to Solve
    The Chemical History of a Candle
    The Art of Electronics
    Godel, Echer, Bach
    Mathematical Theory of Communication
    Dirac's lectures on quantum mechanics
    Einstein's popular lectures on relativity
    A brief history of time
    Origin of Species
    Stryer's Biochemistry
    Biochemical calculations
    Pauling's General Chemistry
    The Business of Software
    Design Patterns

    The list is pretty long, but that, I think, is a really good start. The first 4 is a really good start on algebra based science and math. There's some calculus in Dirac's lecture, Shannon's information theory, and the art of electronics, but the most just uses algebra.

Similar Threads

  1. [Fi] What does Fi look like and what are ii'ts strengths and applications?
    By burningranger in forum Myers-Briggs and Jungian Cognitive Functions
    Replies: 68
    Last Post: 09-21-2017, 02:44 PM
  2. Hi! Generally struggling and confused...
    By wolfsbane in forum What's my Type?
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-11-2014, 01:43 PM
  3. Science and Morality
    By Epiphany in forum Science, Technology, and Future Tech
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-24-2010, 07:33 PM
  4. Clarence Darrow v G.K. Chesterton on evolution, science, and religion
    By Sniffles in forum Philosophy and Spirituality
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 08-03-2009, 06:47 PM
  5. Science and Love
    By Pseudonym_Alpha in forum The Fluff Zone
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 01-07-2008, 11:24 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO