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  1. #1
    Senior Member prplchknz's Avatar
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    Default Do you learn in a traditional setting?

    I mean like a classroom in the traditional mannner? Or are you different. I don't learn in the classroom, I tend to learn best with a combination of hands on seeing how it relates to my life (it can be loosely related, but there needs to be a connection, or else forget it) and one on one. I get bored and feel like the teacher goes too slow in a classroom setting, so i'll pay attention for a little bit then get bored wander off in my mind come back and have missed 3-4 important key points. I also don't learn from reading, unless it's my interest of the month. I need to either do it, hear it, see it physically, or speak it.

  2. #2
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I learn well in a traditional setting. When I was in elementary school I did not. Or maybe I did, but they kept going over the same stuff repeatedly and I got bored and zoned out. I'm not sure. I never got good grades but I did well on the standardized tests in every subject except for math. I learned how to cram effectively in high school and I've done okay when I wanted to ever since then.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  3. #3
    Senior Member Habba's Avatar
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    Naturally. I almost never had to read for any exams and I got to go to the college I wanted. There I had read a little bit more since not everything was being discussed at lectures. But I'm pretty sure my studying is much more relaxed compared to others. I thimk it's Si.
    "The present is theirs; the future, for which I have really worked, is mine."
    -Nikola Tesla

  4. #4
    Phantonym
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    Quote Originally Posted by prplchknz View Post
    I get bored and feel like the teacher goes too slow in a classroom setting, so i'll pay attention for a little bit then get bored wander off in my mind come back and have missed 3-4 important key points.
    This happens to me all the time.

    To me, taking classes in person is usually just a huge waste of time. I either get hypersensitive to the people and the surrounding environment, or completely space out with my thoughts. Either way, it's very distracting and not good for learning.

    But I do like when the teachers are enthusiastic, passionate about their subject matter, exhibit their great personalities and make the subject interesting. Then it feels great, and I can remember the oddest little things that are interesting to me. Unfortunately, these are mostly not the things asked on the exams.

    I like online classes when I have complete control over my schedule. I learn best by writing out the important information I've read or heard. Once I've seen something in a book or on handouts, I can easily remember it during exams.

  5. #5
    Senior Member cafe's Avatar
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    I take notes as a way to stay focused on the lecture. If I don't do something active to divide my concentration up, I will get bored with the rate of information and my mind will wander. I may never look at the notes but if I didn't take them, I'd either have to fidget in some other way or I would only recall about a fourth of what was said in class. Taking notes works best because in addition to not being distracting to other students, it makes you look studious to the instructor, which can never hurt.

    I have a very difficult time staying on task with things that don't fully engage me. If I'm doing chores, I listen to audiobooks or I'll think of something else I meant to do and wander off and leave things half done. Music does not engage enough of my brain to work for more than a few minutes. I have to have my brain engaged enough that my body can go on auto-pilot for washing dishes and stuff like that. Wireless headphones are lifesavers for me.
    “There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs.”
    ~ John Rogers

  6. #6
    Unapologetic being Evolving Transparency's Avatar
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    Depends on your definition of learning.

    If you mean: commit to memory by repetition, then no, I don't learn in that fashion, or that setting.

    I can learn in the sense of: gaining the theoretical or practical understanding of a subject, in an environment where I'm able to have the questions "why" and "what" answered.

    Not by being told "how" to learn it.

    I will learn it if I'm curious to learn it.

    If you tell me I have to learn it for such an such reasons that I care little for, then I will barely read the chapter, pass the test/class with an A, and remember nothing longterm.

    I find the idea of homework to be worthless

    I also don't like umbrella testing. Nor do I understand how anyone can thrive in either one of those environments.

  7. #7
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    Sure, as long as no one bothers me. I learn even better on my own, but I procrastinate more. I have to do everything right there and then, then sleep on it, then the next day think deeply about it, then I've learnt it forever.

  8. #8
    Entertaining Cracker five sounds's Avatar
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    I definitely have my own little tricks to making it work for me.

    I tend to participate a lot in class just to keep myself actively engaged. I also must be doodling or have some kind of like side-project i can turn to if my concentration is starting to fade. Study-wise, I'm a crammer, but I usually retain a lot from lectures just from sitting in the room, so I'm generally just cramming the little facts and details and am pretty good at catching the overall ideas. I also happen to be a good test-taker, and don't get nervous about them, so I think that helps.

    I hate having to give presentations and group projects generally. I'd much prefer to write papers. Homework is really hard for me to keep up on. I don't think I've ever had perfect attendance.
    You hem me in -- behind and before;
    you have laid your hand upon me.
    Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
    too lofty for me to attain.

  9. #9
    ndovjtjcaqidthi
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    Hate the idea of institutionalized education. Always did.

    To quote my man Schopenhauer again:

    "The ordinary method [of education] is to imprint ideas and opinions, in the strict sense of the word, prejudices, on the mind of the child, before it has had any but a very few particular observations. It is thus that he afterwards comes to view the world and gather experience through the medium of those ready-made ideas, rather than to let his ideas be formed for him out of his own experience of life, as they ought to be."

  10. #10
    Ginkgo
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    In a way, I had to learn how to learn. As a kid, I tended to absorb information through osmosis. Somewhere around my junior year in high school, I realized that I would have to crank it up a notch in order to succeed. I fiddled with different educational tools in order to reverse process information. Once you can reverse process a concept, you've evaluated it and can apply it to other solutions and problems. For instance, if you understand the basics of biology, then you can see how the information serves as a subset of biochemistry. If you prompt yourself to teach others what you've learned, then everything ought to click.

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