User Tag List

12 Last

Results 1 to 10 of 14

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    4/9
    Posts
    37

    Default Mathematics Major

    Anybody majoring in mathematics? I wanted to major in the field and i wanted to know if the workload is massive? if the problem solving is highly difficult? and what types of courses you took? I know I ask alot of questions please answer.
    Hip! Hip! BOO!

  2. #2
    redundant descriptor netzealot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    MBTI
    ISTP
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Knew a guy who majored in math and regretted doing it. He said the only work he could get was as a math teacher. All of the ways math is applied at advanced levels have their own field, like engineering, physics, etc. Kind of like a degree in philosophy.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Yes I Had taken mathematics as a subject for majors, but I couldn't continue it as the syllabus was very difficult and the workload was massive. I would suggest you go for some easier subject and not mathematics.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Socionics
    spso
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LevelZeroHero View Post
    Knew a guy who majored in math and regretted doing it. He said the only work he could get was as a math teacher. All of the ways math is applied at advanced levels have their own field, like engineering, physics, etc. Kind of like a degree in philosophy.
    I wouldn't say it's as bad as philosophy; I'd say a degree in physics is even more useless actually (because its so abstract that it can't be applied to anything else after awhile) whereas a mathematician could always go into financial industry without a PhD if they did adequate statistics etc. This is more applied than pure math; I'd wager pure math is as useless as a physics degree (all theory= no one cares).

    Either way engineering is far better.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    MBTI
    INFJ
    Enneagram
    5w4
    Socionics
    spso
    Posts
    130

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cryonium View Post
    Anybody majoring in mathematics? I wanted to major in the field and i wanted to know if the workload is massive? if the problem solving is highly difficult? and what types of courses you took? I know I ask alot of questions please answer.
    I recommend combining it with like electrical engineering so you aren't stuck HAVING to get a PhD to be lucrative. And yes, it is demanding.

  6. #6
    Senior Member KDude's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    8,263

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LevelZeroHero View Post
    Knew a guy who majored in math and regretted doing it. He said the only work he could get was as a math teacher. All of the ways math is applied at advanced levels have their own field, like engineering, physics, etc. Kind of like a degree in philosophy.
    There's always Wall Street..

  7. #7
    Permabanned
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,338

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cryonium View Post
    Anybody majoring in mathematics? I wanted to major in the field and i wanted to know if the workload is massive? if the problem solving is highly difficult? and what types of courses you took? I know I ask alot of questions please answer.
    I would just get into engineering.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Ism's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    MBTI
    INTP
    Enneagram
    9w1
    Posts
    1,103

    Default

    I agree - shoot for engineering, computer science, economics, etc. if you're good at math. Or, do it in addition to a math major.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elocute View Post
    I wouldn't say it's as bad as philosophy; I'd say a degree in physics is even more useless actually (because its so abstract that it can't be applied to anything else after awhile) whereas a mathematician could always go into financial industry without a PhD if they did adequate statistics etc. This is more applied than pure math; I'd wager pure math is as useless as a physics degree (all theory= no one cares).

    Either way engineering is far better.
    I entered college as a math major and finished as a math/physics double. I then went on to grad school for additional training physics, materials science, and electrical engineering.

    I am not personally aware of any schools where being a math major double majoring as an engineer as well is possible. It sure wasnt the places I went to school.

    If you want to stay in math jobwise, or stick to math/computing stuff in related applied areas, I would say focus on either operations research, statistics, or maybe partial differential equations. Statistics is very broadly applicable.

    I will keep my own personal experiences to this topic to myself, but let me just say that it was common talk among my grad school physics peers that while a physics person *should* be extremely employable in more or less any kind of tech/engineering position the practical reality when dealing with hiring managers and companies and such was that, basically, people 1) didnt know what you were talking about, 2) didnt care what you were talking about, 3) thought you didnt have enough "relevant experience", or 4) didnt know what a physicist is or does and just stuck with the tried and true engineering people. Wit that said, if you want to work at a dedicated research lab, which would probbaly be largely full of PhD physicists and maybe chemists and related things, that is open, but there aren't THAT many research labs out there.

    If you like math because it helps you udnerstand technology/engineering, than the practical thing to do is to go straight into tech/engineering major. If yyou want to do that eventually but want more math first major in math and then jump at the grad school level. If you like computers and programming, consider studying both.

    Math is definitely effortful, there is no way around that. What instructors told us is that if you were smart enough to do well with math in high school then you "had enough" to be a math major. But it would take plenty of work and studying. Some people find a level fo math where they "top out" and just cant really comprehend beyond that level. For me analysis [real, intermediate: the formal proving of calculus] is about where I topped out. Looking back now I could do it, but at the time with all that was going on it was too much and I stuck with more science/applied math [complex analysis, PDE's, fourier stuff]. I learned many years later that many math majors struggle with analysis, and in many schools they changed what and how they teach that subject. Maybe if I had started college 5-8 years later???

    I worked in tech for a number of years, and interfaced with people from various science/tech/engineering backgrounds. Both in work and in school I was frequently surprised by how not-deep many engineers and scientists understanding of math was/is. I think working in engineering/since is much more about wanting to "think" and "solve puzzles" than it is about doing/using/understanding math. I decided that "puzzles" and "thinking" weren't especially my thing, there wasnt enough math, the math wasn't "cool" enough, and that I preferred working with "nicer" more warm and friendly people, so I left tech behind. I'm not sure I'd ever be willing to go back.

    There is much math that I know of, and know some details of, and wish I knew more about. Perhaps in another lifetime???

    If you have other questions feel free to ask.
    Likes N/A liked this post

  10. #10
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    MBTI
    INFP
    Enneagram
    4w5
    Posts
    2,899

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Elocute View Post
    I wouldn't say it's as bad as philosophy; I'd say a degree in physics is even more useless actually (because its so abstract that it can't be applied to anything else after awhile) whereas a mathematician could always go into financial industry without a PhD if they did adequate statistics etc. This is more applied than pure math; I'd wager pure math is as useless as a physics degree (all theory= no one cares).

    Either way engineering is far better.
    I entered college as a math major and finished as a math/physics double. I then went on to grad school for additional training physics, materials science, and electrical engineering.

    I am not personally aware of any schools where being a math major double majoring as an engineer as well is possible. It sure wasnt the places I went to school.

    If you want to stay in math jobwise, or stick to math/computing stuff in related applied areas, I would say focus on either operations research, statistics, or maybe partial differential equations. Statistics is very broadly applicable.

    I will keep my own personal experiences to this topic to myself, but let me just say that it was common talk among my grad school physics peers that while a physics person *should* be extremely employable in more or less any kind of tech/engineering position the practical reality when dealing with hiring managers and companies and such was that, basically, people 1) didnt know what you were talking about, 2) didnt care what you were talking about, 3) thought you didnt have enough "relevant experience", or 4) didnt know what a physicist is or does and just stuck with the tried and true engineering people. Wit that said, if you want to work at a dedicated research lab, which would probbaly be largely full of PhD physicists and maybe chemists and related things, that is open, but there aren't THAT many research labs out there.

    If you like math because it helps you udnerstand technology/engineering, than the practical thing to do is to go straight into tech/engineering major. If yyou want to do that eventually but want more math first major in math and then jump at the grad school level. If you like computers and programming, consider studying both.

    Math is definitely effortful, there is no way around that. What instructors told us is that if you were smart enough to do well with math in high school then you "had enough" to be a math major. But it would take plenty of work and studying. Some people find a level fo math where they "top out" and just cant really comprehend beyond that level. For me analysis [real, intermediate: the formal proving of calculus] is about where I topped out. Looking back now I could do it, but at the time with all that was going on it was too much and I stuck with more science/applied math [complex analysis, PDE's, fourier stuff]. I learned many years later that many math majors struggle with analysis, and in many schools they changed what and how they teach that subject. Maybe if I had started college 5-8 years later???

    I worked in tech for a number of years, and interfaced with people from various science/tech/engineering backgrounds. Both in work and in school I was frequently surprised by how not-deep many engineers and scientists understanding of math was/is. I think working in engineering/since is much more about wanting to "think" and "solve puzzles" than it is about doing/using/understanding math. I decided that "puzzles" and "thinking" weren't especially my thing, there wasnt enough math, the math wasn't "cool" enough, and that I preferred working with "nicer" more warm and friendly people, so I left tech behind. I'm not sure I'd ever be willing to go back.

    There is much math that I know of, and know some details of, and wish I knew more about. Perhaps in another lifetime???

    If you have other questions feel free to ask.

Similar Threads

  1. [NF] What would it be like if NF's were the majority?
    By sych0 in forum The NF Idyllic (ENFP, INFP, ENFJ, INFJ)
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 09-24-2014, 03:26 PM
  2. What type do you think a majority of mafia/mobsters would be?
    By swordpath in forum Popular Culture and Type
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 03-07-2010, 11:05 AM
  3. Trusting intuition regarding major life decisions
    By ThatsWhatHeSaid in forum General Psychology
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 08-18-2008, 03:57 AM
  4. Possible Majors
    By prplchknz in forum Academics and Careers
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-12-2008, 07:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO