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  1. #21
    Analytical Dreamer Coriolis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    I think it would be beneficial for children to have an understanding of mental and emotional health, as well as coping strategies, during their formative years. The cruelties of school in childhood and adolescence will influence what kind of adults students grow up to be; and many kids are scarred for life with unhealthy thinking patterns and defense mechanisms that may lead to trouble in the professional world or possibly a life of violence. With the prevalence of bullying and school tragedies, it is clear that our youth are not receiving the emotional care they need. We teach kids the fundamentals of math, science and english, but leave them to fend for themselves when it comes to psychological development. Some of the most intellectually gifted students are lacking in emotional intelligence and struggling with mental health issues.
    These kids should not be blamed or punished for being targets of bullying. If we teach psychology as effectively as we teach math and science, we will surely do more harm than good. If anything, they should be left alone to develop their natural talents. This leads to success and self-confidence, which are natural antidotes to bullying and intimidation.

    Quote Originally Posted by skylights View Post
    I absolutely agree. I think there should be a sort of "life coping" class taught in schools in general - stress management, holistic wellbeing, developing healthy coping mechanisms, and encouraging independence (ie financial management, etc). Of course elementary is early to start learning Freudian defense mechanisms or 401ks, but tailoring focus on wellbeing to students of any age could be incredibly beneficial.
    I like the idea of coping skills, but would focus more on objective content, like financial management and critical thinking. The former can be taught even to very young children, as they learn the value of money, interest, credit, and debt. The latter itself is a good way to counteract peer pressure and avoid many of the common pitfalls of tween and adolescent years. Psychological theory is useless except as an academic study for older students. Standards of professional behavior and even negotiating skills (skills, not so much theory) would be more useful.

    Quote Originally Posted by decrescendo View Post
    Sorry for the pessimism, but I've been through D.A.R.E., bullying seminars, "character-building" classes, etc. and I'm positive that anything good I see in my peers is not a result of those programs. I realize that kids would be more receptive to something that could directly benefit them, but it's hard to imagine that they'd take it that seriously. Public awareness still has a long way to go - kids are conditioned to see mental/emotional health issues as a joke.
    Don't be sorry. DARE specifically has been soundly discredited as a way to keep kids off drugs. The fact that so many schools continue to use the program says much about their priorities and ability (desire) to make rational decisions. (And these are the folks to teach kids life coping skills???) There is a one-size-fits-all aspect to these programs worthy of the TSA, in that students who never touched an illicit drug and never will were bombarded with the same type and amount of propaganda as those truly at risk of doing so. No wonder it didn't work.
    I've been called a criminal, a terrorist, and a threat to the known universe. But everything you were told is a lie. The truth is, they've taken our freedom, our home, and our future. The time has come for all humanity to take a stand...

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coriolis View Post
    I like the idea of coping skills, but would focus more on objective content, like financial management and critical thinking. The former can be taught even to very young children, as they learn the value of money, interest, credit, and debt. The latter itself is a good way to counteract peer pressure and avoid many of the common pitfalls of tween and adolescent years. Psychological theory is useless except as an academic study for older students. Standards of professional behavior and even negotiating skills (skills, not so much theory) would be more useful.
    What do you think "critical thinking" curriculum should cover, specifically?

  3. #23
    Level 8 Propaganda Bot SpankyMcFly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    I think it would be beneficial for children to have an understanding of mental and emotional health, as well as coping strategies, during their formative years. The cruelties of school in childhood and adolescence will influence what kind of adults students grow up to be; and many kids are scarred for life with unhealthy thinking patterns and defense mechanisms that may lead to trouble in the professional world or possibly a life of violence. With the prevalence of bullying and school tragedies, it is clear that our youth are not receiving the emotional care they need. We teach kids the fundamentals of math, science and english, but leave them to fend for themselves when it comes to psychological development. Some of the most intellectually gifted students are lacking in emotional intelligence and struggling with mental health issues.
    An intriguing idea. First thing that poped into my head is that kids barely learn right from wrong usually around 7-8? Depends on the parents and other factors but that's a good benchmark. Secondly, schools are for teaching academics, not raising kids and instilling values (it's bad enough school is daycare for some families, yay for two earners?) . I mention values because there are some parents who would question the use of psychology at all, let alone in their kids school. Lastly, I think the coddling started back in the early 80's and this is an ongoing thing I sometimes deal with, see photo




    I do think something like school counselors for primary education would be a good step in the right direction. Formal classes though? Naw.

    P.S. I was shy in my later years of highschool. My first job working in retail cured that , mostly.

    P.S.S. I am a father of two girls, 12 & 9 both are still in primary education

    P.S.S.S. Watching Elmer Fudd chase Bugs Bunny around with a shotgun, strangely, did not make me want to commit mass murder. Go figure!
    "The most merciful thing in the world, I think, is the inability of the human mind to correlate all its contents... Some day the piecing together of dissociated knowledge will open up such terrifying vistas of reality, and of our frightful position therein, that we shall either go mad from the revelation or flee from the light into the peace and safety of a new Dark Age. " - H.P. Lovecraft

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    I think it would be beneficial for children to have an understanding of mental and emotional health, as well as coping strategies, during their formative years. The cruelties of school in childhood and adolescence will influence what kind of adults students grow up to be; and many kids are scarred for life with unhealthy thinking patterns and defense mechanisms that may lead to trouble in the professional world or possibly a life of violence. With the prevalence of bullying and school tragedies, it is clear that our youth are not receiving the emotional care they need. We teach kids the fundamentals of math, science and english, but leave them to fend for themselves when it comes to psychological development. Some of the most intellectually gifted students are lacking in emotional intelligence and struggling with mental health issues.
    There was a saying I once heard, "the things we learn in a lifetime were the things we were taught in kindergarten." One thing that comes to my mind in particular is the saying "everyone is different." You'd think the sheer amount of fucking idiots who project onto others would be lower than it is. I still can't believe there are people out there who think everyone thinks just like they do. Maybe the idea needs to be expounded upon.

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