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  1. #11
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    I don't like the idea at all.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    I don't like the idea at all.
    What do you find particularly off-putting? Please, expound.

  3. #13
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    It would be great for reasons that you and others have pinpointed.

    The setback is society hasn't yet recognized much value/returns from an understanding of psychology, inner and outer, and so there's not much incentive to teach it. Hopefully, that will change.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bologna View Post
    It would be great for reasons that you and others have pinpointed.

    The setback is society hasn't yet recognized much value/returns from an understanding of psychology, inner and outer, and so there's not much incentive to teach it. Hopefully, that will change.
    Yes, hopefully, it will. Especially in light of the increasing number of school tragedies. I am astounded that some people don't think psychology is relevant or beneficial to these children. It might not be a hard science, but there is plenty of valuable research into the minds and behaviors of people to warrant serious consideration of its value to the education of jr (high school) students.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    What do you find particularly off-putting? Please, expound.
    I don't think psychology is in a position to be prescriptive as opposed to descriptive...especially if it is mandated.
    I don't like the thought that my child would be taught the "right" way to think, feel, be....I'm not too sure that a right way exists...I think the better or "healthier" way can be limiting.
    Limits are good, but not on children, and not so early in life.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by xisnotx View Post
    I don't think psychology is in a position to be prescriptive as opposed to descriptive...especially if it is mandated.
    I don't like the thought that my child would be taught the "right" way to think, feel, be....I'm not too sure that a right way exists...I think the better or "healthier" way can be limiting.
    Limits are good, but not on children, and not so early in life.
    I don't think psychology necessarily teaches right or wrong ways to think, in terms of ethics, if that is your concern. Although, I would support schools teaching philosophy, as well, to urge kids to think for themselves and consider various outside perspectives.

    A lot of teenagers deal with self-esteem issues that lead to unhealthy behaviors. Perhaps, many haven't engaged in enough introspection to discern the underlying motivations for their actions, nor even know how to.

    Peer pressure is a big factor in the decision-making process of many young people. Social hierarchies are formed and outsiders are ostracised. Certainly, an understanding of social conditioning and the overwhelming influence to conform may help naive kids put things into perspective and make better decisions.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    I think it would be beneficial for children to have an understanding of mental and emotional health, as well as coping strategies, during their formative years. The cruelties of school in childhood and adolescence will influence what kind of adults students grow up to be; and many kids are scarred for life with unhealthy thinking patterns and defense mechanisms that may lead to trouble in the professional world or possibly a life of violence. With the prevalence of bullying and school tragedies, it is clear that our youth are not receiving the emotional care they need. We teach kids the fundamentals of math, science and english, but leave them to fend for themselves when it comes to psychological development. Some of the most intellectually gifted students are lacking in emotional intelligence and struggling with mental health issues.
    I think we should make children take classes in finance. Most teens coming out of high school have no concept of money.

  8. #18
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    I just really doubt that an intellectual understanding of psychology could have an impact on the emotional lives of kids, at-risk or not. It's only minimally successful with adults most times.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moniker View Post
    What do you find particularly off-putting? Please, expound.
    As a counselor in training (about a year away from my masters) I also think this is off-putting.

    My problem isn't that I'm against teaching kids emotional skills. That's a no-brainer. The question is how this to best teach emotional skills.

    Most teachers who teach psychology, and indeed most teachers who teach psychotherapy/counseling, don't really teach it at a beneficial level because (1) they don't always understand what they're teaching and (2) if they do, they don't really know how to teach it in a way that it can be used skillfully. Generally, what you find is that teachers will just recite what's in a book which is abstract and theoretical. That's not going to help kids. It rarely even helps adults. It's rare that the information is really digested or internalized...or retained. I say this based on personal experience. Part of the reason is that teachers aren't paid well and aren't selected based on the right criteria.

    I think you have the right idea but the wrong strategy. The way I think social skills are taught are by example. Teachers who are emotionally intelligent teach their students emotional intelligence by virtue of vicarious learning and modeling. Small interactions can teach students a lot, especially those that are challenging. Ideally, at some point, you hire teachers who really know how to connect with students and explain some of these things, but without that, traditional teaching is useless, even possibly harmful.

  10. #20
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    Most of the classes in primary school have extremely little time to dedicate to other subjects unfortunately. It'd be rather difficult to teach more of the theories so that the children truly understand, but I don't see any harm in exposing them to these concepts.

    I think memory for example (60% of any undergraduate psychology course and what most students found boring) would probably be quite useful to these children. I also like the idea of explaining to children that they view the world in a different way to the other child, but that can be taught through other subjects as well such as English literacy.

    The only issue I've stumbled upon was whether it is good to be teaching children these short-cuts and strategies at such an early age. I remember explaining to one kid about how to add 9, by first adding 10 and then subtracting 1 since it's a lot easier for the younger ones to work in 5s and 10s. While the teacher was happy that I was explaining it to the kid, she also mentioned that it's important for these children to have the basics down first. The ability to count it out, perhaps do it mentally rather than going straight to the shortcuts.

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