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    No moss growing on me Giggly's Avatar
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    Default Greed

    Big business has been demanding both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence in their employees for decades, yet they are still whining about not being able to find both of those things in one person so easily. I wonder why they bother to keep demanding this. I mean like, you can't make some dry, cold person become more authentically social or warm, and you can't make a squishy social butterfly become more calculating with killer instincts. By the time people become balanced their career is almost over anyway. They just sound like a broken record. I think it's funny that they still don't put "Must have Emotional and Social intelligence" in job descriptions. Why is that, I wonder?

    http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/10/the_...hip_skill.html

    The Must-Have Leadership Skill

    3:19 PM Friday October 14, 2011
    by Daniel Goleman
    Daniel Goleman is Co-Director of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations at Rutgers University, co-author of Primal Leadership: Leading with Emotional Intelligence, and author of The Brain and Emotional Intelligence: New Insights and Leadership: Selected Writings.


    "We hired a new CEO, but had to let him go after just seven months," the chairman of an East Coast think tank complained to me recently. "His resume looked spectacular, he did splendidly in all the interviews. But within a week or two we were hearing pushback from the staff. They were telling us, 'You hired a first-rate economist with zero social intelligence.' He was pure command and control."

    The think tank's work centers on interlocking networks of relationships with the board, staff, donors, and a wide variety of academics and policy experts. The CEO urgently needed to manage those relationships, but lacked the interpersonal skills that organizations increasingly need in their leaders. A CEO who fails to navigate those relationships artfully, the think tank's board saw, could torpedo the organization.

    Why does social intelligence emerge as the make-or-break leadership skill set? For one, leadership is the art of accomplishing goals through other people.

    As I've written with my colleague Richard Boyatzis, technical skills and self-mastery alone allow you to be an outstanding individual contributor. But to lead, you need an additional interpersonal skill set: you've got to listen, communicate, persuade, collaborate.

    That was brought home to me yet again reading "Making Yourself Indispensable," by John H. Zenger, Joseph R. Folkman, and Scott E. Edinger, which makes the strong point that a leader's competencies are synergistic. The more different competencies a leader displays at strength, the greater her business results.

    But there's another critically important rule-of-thumb: some competencies matter more than others, particularly at the higher levels of leadership. For C-level executives, for example, technical expertise matters far less than the art of influence: you can hire people with great technical skills, but then you've got to motivate, guide and inspire them.

    While Zenger, Folkman, and Edinger make a strong empirical case that competencies matter, it overlooks a crucial point: some competencies matter more than others. Specifically, there are threshold competencies, the abilities every leader needs to some degree, and then there are distinguishing competencies, the abilities you find only in the stars.

    You can be the most brilliant innovator, problem-solver or strategic thinker, but if you can't inspire and motivate, build relationships or communicate powerfully, those talents will get you nowhere. What Zenger and colleagues call the "interpersonal skills" — and what I call social intelligence — are the secret sauce in top-performing leadership.

    Lacking social intelligence, no other combination of competences is likely to get much traction. Along with whatever other strengths they may have, the must-have is social intelligence.

    So how do you spot this skill set? An executive with a long track record of satisfactory hires told me how his organization assessed social intelligence in a prospect during the round of interviews, group sessions, meals, and parties that candidates there routinely went through.

    "We'd watch carefully to see if she talks to everyone at the party or a dinner, not just the people who might be helpful to her," he said. One of the social intelligence indicators: during a getting-to-know you conversation, does the candidate ask about the other person or engage in a self-centered monologue? At the same time, does she talk about herself in a natural way? At the end of the conversation, you should feel you know the person, not just the social self she tries to project.

    I wouldn't use such subjective measures alone — you're better off to combine them with best practices on hiring without firing. But don't ignore your gut.

  2. #2
    Administrator highlander's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    Big business has been demanding both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence in their employees for decades, yet they are still whining about not being able to find both of those things in one person so easily. I wonder why they bother to keep demanding this. I mean like, you can't make some dry, cold person become more authentically social or warm, and you can't make a squishy social butterfly become more calculating with killer instincts. By the time people become balanced their career is almost over anyway. They just sound like a broken record. I think it's funny that they still don't put "Must have Emotional and Social intelligence" in job descriptions. Why is that, I wonder?

    http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/10/the_...hip_skill.html
    The reason they bother is because it relates directly to performance - both of the individual and of the team or organization they lead. Poor leadership results in lower productivity, morale problems and turnover. Even if those things are not immediately apparent and the person gets short term results, the impacts are definitely felt over time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by highlander View Post
    The reason they bother is because it relates directly to performance - both of the individual and of the team or organization they lead. Poor leadership results in lower productivity, morale problems and turnover. Even if those things are not immediately apparent and the person gets short term results, the impacts are definitely felt over time.
    +7
    business is business. those without the skills should get different jobs.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly View Post
    Big business has been demanding both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence in their employees for decades, yet they are still whining about not being able to find both of those things in one person so easily. I wonder why they bother to keep demanding this. I mean like, you can't make some dry, cold person become more authentically social or warm, and you can't make a squishy social butterfly become more calculating with killer instincts. By the time people become balanced their career is almost over anyway. They just sound like a broken record. I think it's funny that they still don't put "Must have Emotional and Social intelligence" in job descriptions. Why is that, I wonder?

    http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2011/10/the_...hip_skill.html
    you would be surprised what people are capable of when they are forced to learn skills to survive. when your ability to eat is on the line, most people are capable of much more than they previously realized.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Jaguar's Avatar
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    But to lead, you need an additional interpersonal skill set: you've got to listen, communicate, persuade, collaborate.
    Exactly.

    Even someone like myself, who is basically autonomous in nature, knows that in business you have to collaborate to get things done. It might take some extra energy to do it, but it's a must if you want to make something fly. It's that simple. As far as why they are demanding it, Giggly, it's because it's doable. That's why. In the past few decades, I have known many people like myself who can do it all. I disagree that it's difficult to find people who can. Where there's a will, there's a way.

    Quote Originally Posted by Giggly
    I mean like, you can't make some dry, cold person become more authentically social or warm, and you can't make a squishy social butterfly become more calculating with killer instincts.
    In the business world, I don't come across those stereotypical extremes.

  6. #6
    Artisan Conquerer Halla74's Avatar
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    The technique you described in the OP has two purposes:

    (1) It is the same tactic used by a person about to buy a new car. The dealer wants to sell you something on the lot. If you have any brains, you will quickly assess what the dealer DOES have on the lot, and when the sales rep asks you what you are looking for, ask to test drive a model that they do not have as part of their inventory. If you want a red car with black leather interior, and they have one, you tell them that you want a blue car with white leather interior (since they don't have it, they will then be forced to start discounting/offering "incentives" (cash back, better financing, etc.) to compel you to purchase out of their inventory.

    When corporations do this, they create a false sense of dissatisfaction on their part that "hardly any" of the job seekers in the labor market have *EXACTLY* the skill they want to hire for a given position, so they will tell candidates that are "almost qualified" that they will *DO THEM a FAVOR* and hire them in as a "growth opportunity* but at a lower salary than what is asked for by the interviewee, because they are not "exactly what the employer was looking for." It's a smoke and mirrors game.

    (2) Even if employers found the EXACT blend of both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence it wouldn't do them much good because more likely than not that company's organization culture and organizational design are not ready to utilize multi-talented/skilled staff.

    For instance, for years employers have been beating their chests that they want workers who (a) Think "Out of the Box", (b) Have "Natural Leadership Skills", and (c) are willing to "Wear Many Hats" as rapidly changing business needs require.

    BULLSHIT. I exhibit all of the traits above (a, b, and c) and no employer I've worked for in the past 9 years has allowed me to fully utilize my natural skill set along with my education/work experience to create new efficiencies and make significant improvements to the way things have always been done.

    It's double speak.

    If you want to realize your full potential in the job markett create your own work, and don't limit yourself with the antiquated precedents of other people's dysfunctional companies/organizations.



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    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    The way I see it is this:

    In general:

    There are "leader" personalities, who are gifted to lead, and there are those who have proven themselves through competency and tactfulness. They land in the successful leadership roles. Some people naturally have a combination corporations are looking for, and they move ahead of the pack. They are built-to-last, when everyone else fails. During a time like we are seeing now of economic downturn, they are the people left standing.

    (I think a person who is naturally gifted in leadership, or anyone else in a leadership position, has to adapt to these roles. The key here is adaptability. You CAN bring out the best in people. No you can't make a person who is cold and calculating into someone who is of a different nature, but the person can adapt and grow into a positive role, and move toward a more positive personality that people like. You have to make yourself fit into the company culture; it will not change to suit you. You can't waltz in and do it your way, and this is where many people fail. Many people are unwilling to listen and adapt.)

    Below them are people who need to be managed. Some of these include great minds who don't do well in leadership positions, but are worthy thinkers and/or doers. Competent in some aspects, but failures at leading. (Many of them have been tested at it.) It's very possible to be one of these, and not be too easy to get along with. It takes having a great or good mind, and performing jobs that everyone couldn't - being specialized.

    And then there are the people who don't last; the ones who, when the economy sinks, they aren't needed to keep the ship running. The ones who don't learn well and don't listen, and/or don't get along. The ones that other people have to follow around with a mop to clean up their messes. The ones where, their skills are not enough to be worth the trouble, and messes they make.

    I think corporations are demanding both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence because it does exist; it's just rather rare. Businesses are letting people know what they want, and in-which direction to move and grow. They are showing you what they need to fill positions that are left open, many times, and some poor soul is working three people's jobs to fill them all, because they can't find anyone who fits the bill. LoL....... My S.O., for instance, has not been able to find anyone to hire for years that fits all of the qualifications, since it is a specialized skillset. So he continues handling all of these jobs himself, because he has no time to train anyone new. If you are lucky enough to find a situation where you can be mentored and trained properly, and you are adaptable and willing to listen and grow, there is nothing holding you back but yourself and your own issues. The sky's the limit. You can be that in-demand person that corporations are looking for, and you can be paid big for it.

    I don't know why they don't put "must have social and emotional intelligence" in the job descriptions, but I think it may be because some people are hired who don't have it, and their skills are such that people do work-arounds in order to deal with it. Sometimes, that's the best you can find, when you need a specialized skillset or a good mind, is someone who is pretty terrible socially. In fact, great minds tend to come along with poor social skills lol.... I think some people are hoping to mentor those skills into people, or successfully manage what they have.

    EDIT: The S.O. said that everyone would tell you they have social and emotional intelligence anyway lol, which they would, and the interview is supposed to flush out the ones who don't have it. I suppose the interviews aren't very successful.......hahaha. Truly, alot of people who end up in thinking positions, don't seem to have much of it. The corporate world is one big clusterfuck, from what I've seen.
    Last edited by ICUP; 10-16-2011 at 01:32 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Halla74 View Post
    The technique you described in the OP has two purposes:

    (1) It is the same tactic used by a person about to buy a new car. The dealer wants to sell you something on the lot. If you have any brains, you will quickly assess what the dealer DOES have on the lot, and when the sales rep asks you what you are looking for, ask to test drive a model that they do not have as part of their inventory. If you want a red car with black leather interior, and they have one, you tell them that you want a blue car with white leather interior (since they don't have it, they will then be forced to start discounting/offering "incentives" (cash back, better financing, etc.) to compel you to purchase out of their inventory.

    When corporations do this, they create a false sense of dissatisfaction on their part that "hardly any" of the job seekers in the labor market have *EXACTLY* the skill they want to hire for a given position, so they will tell candidates that are "almost qualified" that they will *DO THEM a FAVOR* and hire them in as a "growth opportunity* but at a lower salary than what is asked for by the interviewee, because they are not "exactly what the employer was looking for." It's a smoke and mirrors game.

    (2) Even if employers found the EXACT blend of both top-notch skill/expertise AND social/emotional intelligence it wouldn't do them much good because more likely than not that company's organization culture and organizational design are not ready to utilize multi-talented/skilled staff.

    For instance, for years employers have been beating their chests that they want workers who (a) Think "Out of the Box", (b) Have "Natural Leadership Skills", and (c) are willing to "Wear Many Hats" as rapidly changing business needs require.

    BULLSHIT. I exhibit all of the traits above (a, b, and c) and no employer I've worked for in the past 9 years has allowed me to fully utilize my natural skill set along with my education/work experience to create new efficiencies and make significant improvements to the way things have always been done.

    It's double speak.

    If you want to realize your full potential in the job markett create your own work, and don't limit yourself with the antiquated precedents of other people's dysfunctional companies/organizations.



    -Alex
    Exactly. Great post.
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    Senior Member ICUP's Avatar
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    So, 1) You think that every corporation who ever places an ad, is playing smoke-and-mirror games?
    2) Every company's culture and organizational design are not ready to utilize multi-talented/skilled staff? I agree that it can be a waiting game, but there are positions available right now, for people with the right skillsets.
    3) You think that XSTP's have natural leadership skills? Because they most certainly do not, imo. There are types who are interpersonally and socially-gifted, and that's what I consider a natural leader, in a corporate capacity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ICUP View Post
    <...Noise...>
    A few weeks ago you told me that I was on your ignore list.
    Looks like you took me off.
    I'm not going to waste my time and compromise the joy of posting here by interacting with you.
    In my opinion, your demeanor is close minded and irritating.
    I've also noticed that you never seem to write anything that's informative or enlightening with regard to what your opinion is.

    You typically respond to other people's posts/replies with critical whining that is highly subjective and devoid of significant factual material.
    Any fool can criticize the work of others, you've mastered that trick.
    Now go and try to write something of your own, I'm sure you'll get the hang of it at some point.

    Until then, don't bother responding to anything I write here.
    You do not exist as far as I am concerned.

    <----Me when I read your posts

    Thanks,

    -Alex
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