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  1. #11
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    My mom was a nurse for her entire adult career (and the same hospital), until she retired a few years ago. She's ISFJ -- very I, very S, and very F. She was very well-suited for the position; she loved being able to care for the tangible needs of others and helping them to feel better, and she was very good at carrying out learned routines even if she did have trouble knowing what to do if she had to operate on the fly.

    Some of the work can be unpleasant (bedpans, dealing with difficult patients, etc.), but her desire to help others feel better seemed to make those lesser issues, and she never really complained about it.

    She worked periods of both day shift and night shift over the years. She actually said she liked night shift better because things were quiet and no one bothered her or distracted her from her routines.

    What are some of the toughest parts?
    For my mom, probably dealing with mean patients, mean doctors, and mean bosses.

    Do you have to be a people person?
    My mom is one of the most quietest, introverted people I know. She is also one of the kindest, she rarely says anything bad about anyone even when deserved. She loves people but it comes out more through quiet one-on-one conversation about daily events and in her gift of "helps" -- she's good at doing tasks to help someone else out.

    Are most of your patients "old" people?
    I'm going to guess it depends on where you work -- not just the facility, but the floor. My mom dealt with cancer patients a lot, and I think they tended to be older.

    Is it really a "S" field and N's generally find it boring/repetitive/mundane?
    I can't speak for other N's, but I've seen SF's excel at it and I know I would be horribly bored. A big factor of what my mom did consisted of following a daily routine to the letter, making sure everything was checked and double-checked, and just chatting with people and making sure they felt okay and had their needs met. I respect that sort of job, but it's not one that I find enjoyable.

    Are most nurses ESF's?
    I think you will find many SF types in nursing, more than others, but that's a guess.

    Is being a IN starting off on the wrong foot?
    It doesn't matter what your type is; it matters how YOU feel about the job duties.

    Is being "smart" seen as a bad thing?
    Well, I felt like my mom's job was to make sure the doctor's orders were carried out. She had to be smart enough to get through school, understand how to give meds, and recognize when a patient might have something wrong going on with them, since she was the one who saw them and talked to them regularly. But there's a hierachy (doctors are in charge), and basically you have the instructions told to you on how to handle a patient, it's not like you have authority to diagnosis things or change treatments, as far as I know.

    Are doctors often rude/condescending?
    My mother described a variety of experience. She said some of the doctors were wonderful and very people-centric while being smart, while some other doctors were arrogant and had no people sense whatsoever. The only time I ever heard her backbite people is when she was describing doctors she felt were not considerate of their patients; it was very important to her.

    What makes you want to quit the most?
    My mom felt bad if she thought the patients were not being treated well. She also did not like her supervisor for some years; she felt she was not fair in her reviews, and also felt this woman catered to her favorites in terms of who got what days off and who got promoted.

    How serious is "burn out"?
    Well, my mom did it 40+ years, but she's very diligent and apt to push through a lot of adversity. I think if the hospital is understaffed (as many are), you might find yourself overworked, and if the staff is not pleasant to do with and the patients make too many demands consistently, you could easily run yourself down.

    Quote Originally Posted by gromit View Post
    shortnsweet is in that field... wish I knew how to do that thing where you mention somebody.
    @gromit: what, like this?
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  2. #12
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    Well, to be honest, I have no idea what it would REALLY be like, as I have no personal experience with nursing. Although the thought has crossed my mind to get involved with it as well.

    I think it can be incredibly rewarding to be able to help people. But people are probably going to be the main cause of frustration and cause an immense amount of stress. I think I'd take wiping off body fluids over dealing with sick cranky people and their other, not immediately medical issues any time.

    I think being an ER nurse would be the busiest and most stressful, considering the urgency, skills and effort put into that. There's going to be difficulties with any field of nursing, that's for sure. Dealing with people always is difficult, and in some fields being able to deal with things psychologically is going to be a challenge.

    Being a people person is definitely a huge plus. But so is not taking things into heart too much. Sick people can get really cranky, no matter what their age is or what ailments they have, and they might start seeing the nurse as sort of a servant, so it takes some serious people skills to manage those kinds of situations. Not that these are the norm, of course. I think.

    If one can deal with these things and can concentrate more on the things that make nursing really rewarding, then it is definitely worth the trouble put into it.

  3. #13
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    I am not a nurse. But I basically was one for 5 months last year when I took care of my mom, and since I am a fellow (fella?! whateva) INFP, maybe I can help a tiny bit. (I also have several nurse friends and relatives.)

    My answers/Friends and Relatives "answers" based on what they have said.

    1- It's a lot of little things. You have to be extremely careful because you are dealing with a human body most of the time. (I don't say this to be Captain Obvious, but the sheer amount of ways you can accidently kill someone or harm them is rather overwhelming at times.) It's tough, can be draining, very rewarding, but also feels like there is little thanks given. People see "Doctor" and assume that they are the thinkers and that nurses are the Oompa Loompas of the healing world. When certain types like Nurse Pracitioner are pretty much doctors for small clinics and have many of the same responsibilities.

    2- When someone is REALLY sick and not going to get better. You know that all you are doing is easing the way a bit, and maybe helping keep the quality of life up as much as possible. When you see patients for years and you watch them do stupid things, or not listen to your advice, or not take their meds...

    3- I think it helps. I really wouldn't consider myself much of a overtly people person. I like to hide in the wings of caring . My nurse friends/relatives are: ESTJx2, INTJx1, ESFJx1, IXFP.4- My first and only was 59. Nurse Practitioner: She sees all ages at a small clinic. She treats anywhere from babies to teens to the elderly. R/N: She nursed in a variety of situations in the hospital she worked at.

    5- I think there is room for both "S" and "N". My INTJ friend is a Nurse Practitioner, and I think she enjoys it because she gets to make decisions and have control like a doctor. The other "regular" nurses and RN are all the SJs. There is A LOT of repition and detail work that needs to be done. *delicate cough @ INFPs*

    6- Not necessarily. I think you will want to research the different types that you can go into, and different fields. I am sure there will be something that will be a great match for your skills!

    7- When is "smart" ever a bad thing . Personally, when I was dealing with my mom's illness, I wanted to see smart nurses, not slack jawed morons (both types I met). I want to feel like I am in good, capable hands with someone... that they are "on the ball". Instead I frequently encountered people who somehow were nurses but couldn't understand simple requests such as "Hi, my mom's bandage fell off. Can you or someone else replace the bandage please?" And that simple request took an hour and 6 different nurses to get done.

    8- This one I can't answer .

    9- Speaking as a patient advocate, the answer is YES. I frequently had moments where I thought, WTF I am 10 times smarter than you because you are missing obvious, glaring things. Example, my mom had intestinal cancer and so food wasn't getting absorbed into her body and she was wasting away, lost about 20-30 lbs in a matter of weeks. And I had to be the one to ask "well, how do you keep people in a coma alive? isn't there some way to get nutrients into her body via another way?!" Doctor: Oh! That's a great idea! Me: Seriously?! Depends on the individual.

    10- INTJ NP: When people don't listen to her. ESTJ: When people don't listen to her. ESFJ: When people die on her watch. ISFP: When things get boring.

    11- N/A

    12- From what I have observed, it is easy to sink too deep into it and get your entire being involved. (It's easy to do because you are doing great work for the world.) I think some good advice is to make sure to pace yourself.

    13- I think it's an awesome profession that is undervalued by people at times. Some people look down on the whole "oh you're a nurse, you just wipe body fluids off of people." Which is part of the job at times - but if you are someone who is so sick and cannot do that for themselves... It is a whole different kind of love having someone do that for you so that the sick person can be clean, taken care of, and their quality of life maintained as high as possible. So go forth little INFP! Do great things with the world! *bestows crown of idealism upon your brow*

  4. #14
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beargryllz View Post
    Truthfully, I hope I never own a lawn

    And I do recycle dishes, but after a while something simply has to be done
    Indeed! I never mow lawns either but that's more due to my hayfever. (At least it is good for something, hey?)
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  5. #15
    @.~*virinaĉo*~.@ Totenkindly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by saturned
    My INTJ friend is a Nurse Practitioner,
    Yeah, I wasn't considering them in my response. I have an INFJ female friend who is a nurse practitioner; she decided she didn't want to spend the years training to be a doctor, but still has some autonomy. Also, my primary care physician is actually a nurse practitioner -- I think she's an ESTP, actually -- and is very autonomous, she simply needs doctor oversight behind the scenes but otherwise my interactions with her are just like they are with an actual doctor.

    I guess I just see nurse practioners to be less like nurses and more like doctors.
    "Hey Capa -- We're only stardust." ~ "Sunshine"

    “Pleasure to me is wonder—the unexplored, the unexpected, the thing that is hidden and the changeless thing that lurks behind superficial mutability. To trace the remote in the immediate; the eternal in the ephemeral; the past in the present; the infinite in the finite; these are to me the springs of delight and beauty.” ~ H.P. Lovecraft

  6. #16
    Anew Leaf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer View Post
    Yeah, I wasn't considering them in my response. I have an INFJ female friend who is a nurse practitioner; she decided she didn't want to spend the years training to be a doctor, but still has some autonomy. Also, my primary care physician is actually a nurse practitioner -- I think she's an ESTP, actually -- and is very autonomous, she simply needs doctor oversight behind the scenes but otherwise my interactions with her are just like they are with an actual doctor.

    I guess I just see nurse practioners to be less like nurses and more like doctors.
    Yeah, that makes sense. I was viewing the nursing as a whole because to get to be an NP you have to get your nursing degree first. I think if I went the nursing route I would have to do the NP (ahah) route as well. But as a non J with no Ti or Te in sight, I think I would be not so great.

  7. #17
    Nips away your dignity Fluffywolf's Avatar
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    Damnit. I thought I could, but I can't keep it in any longer...

    ...Before or after they grow their milk teeth?
    ~Self-depricating Megalomaniacal Superwolf

  8. #18
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fluffywolf View Post
    Damnit. I thought I could, but I can't keep it in any longer...

    ...Before or after they grow their milk teeth?
    After. Definitely after.
    NTJ's are the only types that have ever made me feel emo.
    ENP's are the only types that have ever made me feel like a sensor.


    There are two great days in a person's life - the day we are born and the day we discover why. --William Barclay

  9. #19
    Senior Member King sns's Avatar
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    I'm an RN, and have been for a year. CNA for three years before that. So i've been in healthcare for a total of four years. Right now I'm in long term care and skilled rehab. (Lots of people coming from surgeries and in need of strengthening, but some other cases too, lots CHF's, pneumonias, wounds, arterial and venous insufficiencies, well, a little bit of everything.) I'm probably going to go for my NP and remain in healthcare for my life. I digresss.

    So what is nursing REALLY like?
    It has it's ups and downs. You have to be committed to it like a marriage, you have to give it your all. And if you like it and do a good job at the end of the day, it's very satisfying and fulfilling work. It will become a big part of your identity.

    What are some of the toughest parts?

    In the beginning, for me, it was all the "abuse" or, more sincerely, sick people getting upset. After a while, you can read further past that into their suffering and effectively make them better. Now, it's the loads and loads of paperwork. Some of it can be repetitive. You have to cover all your bases all the time and be focused on mundane details, making sure that your i's are dotted and your t's are crossed.

    Do you have to be a people person?
    You should like people. Do you have to be an extravert? It helps, I can't say much for introverts as I really enjoy 8 hours of constant talking.

    Are most of your patients "old" people?

    In my field? Yes. In the hospital floors? Still yes. We have a growing population of chronically ill baby boomers so the people who are admitted onto the floors have more than just flu-bugs and broken bones. It's diabetes and renal failure heaven nowadays. It really depends on where you go though. I'm planning on being a Family Nurse Pratitioner, will probably end up in a cushy office focusing on both illness and wellness throughout the lifespan. (A generalist.) You can choose to work with any population you want, though.

    Is it really a "S" field and N's generally find it boring/repetitive/mundane?
    There are aspects of the job that are very repetitive and routine. But the nurse is taught to "think like an RN" and that means to look at the whole picture of people's care. Psychologically, spiritually, physically, emotionally. You develop "nursing judgement" if you have your RN, and that means that you can look at the patient as a whole picture and know what to do. The science can be interesting, too. The more you know about the human body, illness, and wellness, the better you will be. Creative ability shines the most when talking to patients and planning their care, making suggestions to the MD, and many more. It's all evidence-based, though, so you won't be coming up with wildly imaginative and flowery plans, as whatever you are doing needs to be proven to work. (Well, we hope doctors and nurses are all doing things that work, anyways!!!) Repetitive and routine things are more along the lines of med administration, treatments, discharges, admissions,(though they can be fun because there is a lot of planning involved) tasks, transcribing orders.

    Are most nurses ESF's?
    There are a lot of us, yes. In nursing school in our last semester we actually took a color test, (that went along with the four types.) It was interesting to see how 56 of us nurses divided up. It was similar to the general population, though, and since a lot of people in general are ESF's, a lot of nurses are ESF's, if that makes sense. About half the class was gold, (SJ), 25 percent was blue, (NF), followed by SP's, and finally about 5 NT's. (Rough guesstimate on all counts.) That was my lil' study. Like I said, you can go into any field, doesn't have to be strongly skill and task based. Oh, and if you were curious about how many made it into the field, all of us eventually passed and got jobs, I think most everyone is practicing somewhere now a year later.

    Is being a IN starting off on the wrong foot?
    Nope, not at all. Every nurse has something to bring to a healthcare team. There were plenty of those in my class, there are all different viewpoints. They struggled through school for their own reasons, I struggled through school for my own reasons. It's a very tough and eye-opening experience, not for the weak-willed. It has little to do with type, though.

    Is being "smart" seen as a bad thing?
    Being smart is seen the same way it is in any educational program or job. I quickly gained respect for it, but I'm also a people person combined with being smart, so that helped me too. You'll be more successful and gain more enjoyment if you're smart with all the learning opportunities and power over patient's well being.

    Do you have to remember and frequently use your anatomy/physiology training?
    Not constantly, but often enough. You'll use more or less of it depending on the patient population. A cardiac floor will use a lot of cardiac, and so on. Seems like the ICU needs to be heavier on the science end, assessing all systems all the time. Being with a more chronically ill but stabilized population, I use it on a lighter level, but on a lot higher patient load, and benefit from increasing my knowledge.

    Are doctors often rude/condescending?
    Not if you are charming, know how to talk to them, (they teach you that in school), and are a good nurse. They seem to be good then. I've had a little trouble in the beginning, since you don't put it into practice a lot in school, but now I have a very good relationship with all the doctors that I work with. The one that I work with the most is difficult at times, but now I know him better and we get along good. (Side note: There is actually a sector at my work that wants me to date him, despite the fact that I always feel like he's lecturing me/ being condescending!- More digression.)

    What makes you want to quit the most?
    An insanely busy and thankless night when it is impossible to do my job well, and finish all the odds and ends that I need to. This is combatted by a lot of support from co-workers, prioritization, and good communication at report.

    What do you wish someone had told you before you started?
    Nothing, when you're already in healthcare you just "get it" so to speak. The only advice I would have to you is to become an aid first. I did that, so I had a warm up to the big deal.
    How serious is "burn out"?
    It's bad. I've had burn out a few times but came out of it. It effects your whole state of being. You hurt, you feel like you're a hundred years old, you hate people, you don't care, you dread going back to work. I've come out of it, though, you need to take excellent care of yourself outside of work to be a good nurse. Obviously, there is the possibility of burnout beyond relief if you don't know how to deal with burnout.
    Anything else you wanna pass along?

    No, but if you have any questions, I'm a good resource. I love to teach and help new nurses and students succeed. I have a lot of people in real life asking a lot of questions about school and the field and love answering them.
    Oh, and lots of people management/delegation. If you know what you're talking about, that comes naturally, though.


    Edit: Before going into healthcare, I didn't think I was going to do anything science related. Most other people thought I should be a professor or writer, because teaching and writing are where most of my skills are. I personally wanted to be a lawyer or go into advertising, (the creative side of it). God only knows why I became a nurse in the end and decided to stay in the profession. You never know who's meant to be a nurse!
    06/13 10:51:03 five sounds: you!!!
    06/13 10:51:08 shortnsweet: no you!!
    06/13 10:51:12 shortnsweet: go do your things and my things too!
    06/13 10:51:23 five sounds: oh hell naw
    06/13 10:51:55 shortnsweet: !!!!
    06/13 10:51:57 shortnsweet: (cries)
    06/13 10:52:19 RiftsWRX: You two are like furbies stuck in a shoe box

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    My Johari
    by sns.

  10. #20
    unscannable Tigerlily's Avatar
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    How incredibly inspiring! Thank you shortnsweet for your excellent post!!
    Time is a delicate mistress.

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