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  1. #51
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    Depends. Computer Science and Engineering at San Jose State? You are sure as hell going to have Silicon Valley right beside you even with other more "prestigious" institutions like Stanford being close by and Cal Poly being nearby Los Angeles.
    More apt would be getting an MBA at Santa Clara University. Santa Clara University is considered a 'regional college or university' according to US World News and Report etc. rankings. However, it is respected in Silicon Valley (I live here, I know :P) and it's a joke that an MBA from SCU and some visionary from Stanford always team up to make some dream team start up. The SCU person is seen more as more the bread and butter, bookeeping, COO role and the Stanford grad is seen as the idea juice.

    Also, prestige is important, it's as important as you make it. It is very real. If you only plan on doing undergrad, then your undergrad's prestige is more important than the grad school you never go to. Trump's kids "studied business at Wharton" but at the undergrad level only but they still use that name to effect.

    When I talked to someone at the USC b-school she mentioned regionalism is a factor. East coast schools are better known for business, a b-degree from NYU Stern is nationally recognized and will open doors for you because the network is everywhere. She said the grads from USC tend to stay more in CA, and if that's what I wanted then great, but it was a factor to consider...or maybe it was UCLA...I forget now. :P
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  2. #52
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CzeCze View Post
    More apt would be getting an MBA at Santa Clara University. Santa Clara University is considered a 'regional college or university' according to US World News and Report etc. rankings. However, it is respected in Silicon Valley (I live here, I know :P) and it's a joke that an MBA from SCU and some visionary from Stanford always team up to make some dream team start up. The SCU person is seen more as more the bread and butter, bookeeping, COO role and the Stanford grad is seen as the idea juice.

    Also, prestige is important, it's as important as you make it. It is very real. If you only plan on doing undergrad, then your undergrad's prestige is more important than the grad school you never go to. Trump's kids "studied business at Wharton" but at the undergrad level only but they still use that name to effect.

    When I talked to someone at the USC b-school she mentioned regionalism is a factor. East coast schools are better known for business, a b-degree from NYU Stern is nationally recognized and will open doors for you because the network is everywhere. She said the grads from USC tend to stay more in CA, and if that's what I wanted then great, but it was a factor to consider...or maybe it was UCLA...I forget now. :P
    USC is more regional, UCLA is more national. But if it was a CS/Engineering field, I would still stay around Silicon Valley anyhow.

    I mean, you can technically just work in Silicon Valley for a few years before moving somewhere else without worrying about debt while the other might have to worry about a 100k+ debt. But if an MBA is sought for, that is when I think people should decide to go for a more prestigious college like Stanford or Berkeley(or maybe an MBA that is payed for by your employer .) As long as you go for the internships, employers will see that you might have interned at Cisco, Intel, or Google and during that process, you can network with those you worked with while as an intern to get to other places/branches. No matter if someone goes to a prestigious college or not, internships and networking make all the difference.

    And wow, somehow SJSU went 20 blocks down in the ranking.

    I know nothing about Law Colleges though... except Harvard and Yale.... lol.

    ----------------
    (owwwww confusing myself trying to put the right words.)

    What I am saying is

    Further down the road with an undergraduate degree, employers will more likely look at your job experience rather than where you get your degree. If you are going to get a degree at Stanford or Berkeley and not work your butt off compared to that guy at USC (or even SJSU) chances are is that employers would rather have that guy at USC rather than the prestigious college. Prestige does not make a big difference if you decide not to put in the time and effort.

    And another note, if I were allowed to pick between USC or Stanford I would pick Stanford since both cost about the same (and Berkeley cost less for in state students.)

  3. #53
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    Yeah, I'm not trying to say in the long run it's all about your college name. it's about your job experience/history other successes, but college and networking and prestige can definitely help open doors at the beginning and down the road. I do remember though that kinda what you are saying ^^ You have to look at everything in the whole - however, at 17 or 18 as undergrad is your first 'adult step' and you have no work history, that's why where you go is considered so important. Of course, the equation changes by the time you are thinking of grad school, especially as certain grad programs almost require (or outright require) you to have related work experience. I remember someone who works at Cisco or...who's that defense contractor? LOL on of "those" places. They would pay for your masters and you could choose to go to Stanford Or literally walk down the hallway to have SJSU (San Jose State University) literally teach the classes you need at work. Super convenient. I remember thinking, well dang, SJSU sounds convenient but Stanford is definitely more prestigious and higher ranked overall. HOWEVER, then I realized, well dang, you're working at Cisco and your employer values you enough to pay for your masters and bring the classes to you, hmmm, probably 'prestige' is not as big of a deal here. It's more like getting a job certificate for your existing career while you're on an upwar trajectory, just something you kinda check in to do.

    That kind of 'I'm just checking this off my list because I need to do it for my job" btw is why a lot of people from feeder companies get MBAs and that's also why a lot of admissions boards hate that kind of passionless, almost entitled kind of application.

    That wasn't a tangent. It is *related*! :P

    Oh, and I disagree tha education is similar across the board at the undergraduate level. Sometimes an education is just abou conveying technical data or historical survey of all the important cases/names/dates etc., but the real quality of an education comes in how much critical thinking etc. is encouraged. That's why some people prefer liberal arts colleges that offer smaller classes and have a certain philosophy about a broad education etc. So it also depends on what you are looking for. My experience at my liberal arts undergrad and summer school at UC Berkeley and then later career training in community college where all very different terms of the learning environment and way you accessed your education and the way it's transmitted to you. Different strokes for different folks and for different phases of your life/career.

    Again though, I think most 17 year olds don't even really know or care about these things - 'differences in educational environments and teaching philosophies'. At least, that's my impression and also memory of things from that age and the college selection process. But, if you know what you want in terms of major/career already or learning environment styles and preferences, definitely factor that in.
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  4. #54
    Senior Member You's Avatar
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    Cheap state school.
    Oh, its
    You
    ....

  5. #55

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    If you go to an Ivy, make sure someone other than you pays (not your parents either). If your transcripts are stellar, you should have no problem getting a scholarship.

    Having gone to both a state school (a rather good one), and an Ivy equivalent (it out ranks most Ivy League schools), I must admit there can be a difference. But I think it is hard for that difference to show up in a typical undergrad experience. You'll have more interesting choices in an Ivy. But if you were doing engineering or a hard science, I would say it makes little difference in undergrad. Accredited programs in these follow pretty much the same curriculum. In the liberal arts, things may be different.

    If you plan to do a lot of undergraduate research or go on to grad school/professional school... Doing research or being an apprentice with the people leading their fields is quite different from a mentoring perspective than simply working with researchers or practitioners in the field. That being said, there are great researchers and practitioners at state schools too.

    Also, your competition will be tougher at a top 10 school. If you are used to being at the head of the class, things may be different for you. From a planning perspective, getting into Harvard Law after State U liberal arts is better than Harvard Undergrad followed by State U Law. Of course two Ivys back to back is better still.

    Another thing I noticed is that Stanford had a lot more people with entrepreneurial aspirations than Virginia Tech. But if you join the right clubs, and hang out with the right crowd, you could be part of a college start-up anywhere.

    Whatever you decide, try your best to get scholarships.

    Quote Originally Posted by Burning Rave View Post
    [...]networking make all the difference.
    I wish i had known how true this is. I am a horrible networker. Even if you go to Stanford, and work for Intel for some time, if you don't keep in touch with the people you meet, finding jobs becomes a difficult task.

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  6. #56
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    I was accepted to several state schools, a couple of prestigous private schools and the Ivy of my choice back when I applied for college (I tested well, and somehow growing up in a blue collar background in a rural area made me more appealing )... I chose the state school that bribed me the best and spent my first 4 years with a full scholarship that covered even textbooks and room and board, which was awesome

    really, in the end, it's what you make of your educational possibilities that matter the most, not where you went. Get involved in research, study abroad, WORK abroad, get involved with the student government... when you are involved in things you are associating with the people who ARE the motivated kids who are going to get somewhere! A lot of my college friends are now in Ivy League schools (or equivalents) for grad school on full scholarship thanks to what they accomplished as undergrads... meaning that they don't owe a ton of money on thier educations as they would had they gone the Ivy League for everything route... plus, at a state school you get more experiences that way because everyone ISN'T rushing to be the top dog in everything all of the time... that means that you'll end up getting to do and try a lot more, which will look good on your resume if nothing else, not to mention that the experience is a lot of fun and such

    I'm glad that I chose to attend the state school, because I got to do a lot of things that I wouldn't have been able to have afforded had I attended an Ivy League
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  7. #57
    Intergalactic Badass mujigay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    If you go to an Ivy, make sure someone other than you pays (not your parents either). If your transcripts are stellar, you should have no problem getting a scholarship.

    Having gone to both a state school (a rather good one), and an Ivy equivalent (it out ranks most Ivy League schools), I must admit there can be a difference. But I think it is hard for that difference to show up in a typical undergrad experience. You'll have more interesting choices in an Ivy. But if you were doing engineering or a hard science, I would say it makes little difference in undergrad. Accredited programs in these follow pretty much the same curriculum. In the liberal arts, things may be different.

    If you plan to do a lot of undergraduate research or go on to grad school/professional school... Doing research or being an apprentice with the people leading their fields is quite different from a mentoring perspective than simply working with researchers or practitioners in the field. That being said, there are great researchers and practitioners at state schools too.

    Also, your competition will be tougher at a top 10 school. If you are used to being at the head of the class, things may be different for you. From a planning perspective, getting into Harvard Law after State U liberal arts is better than Harvard Undergrad followed by State U Law. Of course two Ivys back to back is better still.

    Another thing I noticed is that Stanford had a lot more people with entrepreneurial aspirations than Virginia Tech. But if you join the right clubs, and hang out with the right crowd, you could be part of a college start-up anywhere.

    Whatever you decide, try your best to get scholarships.



    I wish i had known how true this is. I am a horrible networker. Even if you go to Stanford, and work for Intel for some time, if you don't keep in touch with the people you meet, finding jobs becomes a difficult task.
    Doesn't bother me in the slightest. I rank pretty high, but my school is absolutely cutthroat, I know my worth. We get "prodigy" kids on a regular basis, the kind that make the news for solving thirty-year old math problems, or working with prestigious research institutions and sweeping world competitions.

    I like the advice about networking, that's definitely something I'm going to work to improve, after all the things I've heard here.

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by mujigay View Post
    Doesn't bother me in the slightest. I rank pretty high, but my school is absolutely cutthroat, I know my worth. We get "prodigy" kids on a regular basis, the kind that make the news for solving thirty-year old math problems, or working with prestigious research institutions and sweeping world competitions.

    I like the advice about networking, that's definitely something I'm going to work to improve, after all the things I've heard here.
    What school do you attend, if you don't mind me asking?.
    Last edited by ygolo; 07-05-2011 at 05:57 AM. Reason: Just realized you are some place in Texas

    Accept the past. Live for the present. Look forward to the future.
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  9. #59
    Senior Member INTPness's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ygolo View Post
    What school do you attend, if you don't mind me asking?.
    Quote Originally Posted by INTPness View Post
    She dun like to tell you.
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  10. #60
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    In most cases, where you go to college doesn't matter that much unless its your dream to work in some prestigious law firm or something similar. What matters is that you have the degree and some relevant work experience.
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