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  1. #1
    Senior Member Meek's Avatar
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    After many years of trying to figure out what I would absolutely adore doing, I decided I would enjoy being a scientist and enjoy is an understatement.

    I like being the brain behind things, or at least one of the brains.
    Painting to sell art won't work for me. I will never be good enough, I know it.

    I am not settling for science, though but something about it has always excited me.

    Math is an awful subject for me and boring so I assume science requires a lot of math? The details are fuzzy with this.

    See, my 'dream' job is an astronomer but that shit requires way too much math and I am very forgetful with maths.

    Fear holds me back, though but right now, I am a house keeper and I enjoy it due to the lovely staff I work with who are always so very kind to me and appreciate me. Otherwise, the job would start looking very bleak and useless.

    Has anyone ever heard of an Infp scientist? :P

  2. #2
    Senior Member wildcat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meek View Post
    After many years of trying to figure out what I would absolutely adore doing, I decided I would enjoy being a scientist and enjoy is an understatement.

    I like being the brain behind things, or at least one of the brains.
    Painting to sell art won't work for me. I will never be good enough, I know it.

    I am not settling for science, though but something about it has always excited me.

    Math is an awful subject for me and boring so I assume science requires a lot of math? The details are fuzzy with this.

    See, my 'dream' job is an astronomer but that shit requires way too much math and I am very forgetful with maths.

    Fear holds me back, though but right now, I am a house keeper and I enjoy it due to the lovely staff I work with who are always so very kind to me and appreciate me. Otherwise, the job would start looking very bleak and useless.

    Has anyone ever heard of an Infp scientist? :P
    Try simple equations on your own, without a guide book or a teacher.
    You either solve them or then you don't.
    If you do not solve them, forget about science.
    You will find other things.

  3. #3
    The Eighth Colour Octarine's Avatar
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    I disagree with Wildcat - his 'test' shows that you aren't suited for pure math, not that you aren't suited towards science. Depending on the field, the math can often be more data-analysis oriented (using computers and sometimes programming models), rather than solving mathematical proofs on paper.

    You still need a strong interest in whatever field you choose though. You must find discussing the intricacies of a particular field very interesting if not exciting. The question is what field will most keep your interest.

    Being 'forgetful' of small details is not such a big deal, so long as you have a conceptual understanding of what you are doing - if you are working with a mathematical model, then you will work with it until it works properly - you can learn to spot your mistakes. Astrophysics for example does typically require some high level programming skills. Often with specialised applications that make the job easier - you are not programming applications in the typical sense.
    Here is an example of such a (highly cited) astrophysics paper: http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/...3006.text.html
    The math itself is not that sophisticated, it is the scientific modelling that is sophisticated. Such papers are difficult for non-specialists (including myself) to understand, but not that difficulty for those trained in the field.

    Biology and medical research is becoming increasingly math based too, but in these fields, research is very much team based and the math/programming is usually performed by specialists.

  4. #4
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wildcat View Post
    Try simple equations on your own, without a guide book or a teacher.
    You either solve them or then you don't.
    If you do not solve them, forget about science.
    You will find other things.
    EQUATIONS?!? Please don't. Science isn't about equations, just like literature isn't about spelling. You need to have some mathematical insight, but that can be learnt, just as spelling can be learnt.

    I've met lots of people who tell me "whoa, you're scientist? I've never understood that." And further in the conversation they ask me how soap works, and I tell them, and they wonder why they never liked science in school. "That's easy, if the teacher at school explained it like that...!"
    There are two problems with "science at school". One is the way it's taught and especially, how it's tested. The teacher can explain everything, but if the tests are all about the equations, the students will study the equations and remember science as being all about equations. The other is that, in this occasion, the "student" asked a specific question he's interested in, it's always more fun to get an answer on something you already wondered than to be flooded with knowledge you never asked for.

    The second isn't a problem at all for you. After all, you want to be a scientist.
    The first... well, you'll need the math, of course. But the math will become easy and even fun as soon as the scientific insight is there. I promise.

    Let me try a few science questions. You don't need to get them "right" at first sight, just see if they tickle you.

    (1) You've got two balls, equal diameter, one made of wood and the other of iron. Both are painted with the same paint. You let them fall. Which one will land first?

    (2) You glue the balls of question (1) together. How fast will the combined ball fall, compared to the separate ones?

    (3) You've got two identical light bulbs. Firstly, you connect one of them to a battery. Then you add the second in series. Will the first lamp burn brighter, less bright, or equally bright after you added the second bulb?

    If science interests you, please don't hesitate. Try. Don't let the maths scare you. If you can grasp concepts like force and velocity, the mathematical concept of vectors will suddenly be easy. Heck, even the relativity equations are... just equations. You can look them up if you need them. Relativity isn't about E = mc^2, to take the best known (and easiest) equation of relativity, but about inertia (the property of resisting against change) and energy (the property of being able to cause change) being one and the same. See the difference?

    Never mind type. I can't name a well-known INFP scientist (though I suspect some of my former colleagues), but why would that stop you? If there aren't INFP scientists yet, there should be!

    Last but not least: if you started to do experiments in order to answer my questions, you don't have to become a scientist. Then you are one already.
    Got questions? Ask an ENTP!
    I'm female. I just can't draw women

  5. #5
    Senior Member Meek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamske View Post
    EQUATIONS?!? Please don't. Science isn't about equations, just like literature isn't about spelling. You need to have some mathematical insight, but that can be learnt, just as spelling can be learnt.

    I've met lots of people who tell me "whoa, you're scientist? I've never understood that." And further in the conversation they ask me how soap works, and I tell them, and they wonder why they never liked science in school. "That's easy, if the teacher at school explained it like that...!"
    There are two problems with "science at school". One is the way it's taught and especially, how it's tested. The teacher can explain everything, but if the tests are all about the equations, the students will study the equations and remember science as being all about equations. The other is that, in this occasion, the "student" asked a specific question he's interested in, it's always more fun to get an answer on something you already wondered than to be flooded with knowledge you never asked for.

    The second isn't a problem at all for you. After all, you want to be a scientist.
    The first... well, you'll need the math, of course. But the math will become easy and even fun as soon as the scientific insight is there. I promise.

    Let me try a few science questions. You don't need to get them "right" at first sight, just see if they tickle you.

    (1) You've got two balls, equal diameter, one made of wood and the other of iron. Both are painted with the same paint. You let them fall. Which one will land first?

    (2) You glue the balls of question (1) together. How fast will the combined ball fall, compared to the separate ones?

    (3) You've got two identical light bulbs. Firstly, you connect one of them to a battery. Then you add the second in series. Will the first lamp burn brighter, less bright, or equally bright after you added the second bulb?

    If science interests you, please don't hesitate. Try. Don't let the maths scare you. If you can grasp concepts like force and velocity, the mathematical concept of vectors will suddenly be easy. Heck, even the relativity equations are... just equations. You can look them up if you need them. Relativity isn't about E = mc^2, to take the best known (and easiest) equation of relativity, but about inertia (the property of resisting against change) and energy (the property of being able to cause change) being one and the same. See the difference?

    This proves that science is my calling. I've had two hours of sleep and I have to go to a shitty job today. I can't drink coffee or anything to stimulate me or I have panic attacks. Reading over the balls theory and the light bulb theory woke me up, it was like reading caffeine , lol. That is the best part for me. The fun part of science, which is why I love "Young Einstein" the movie so much. It was very fun to watch. "Roll and rock!" Lols. The problem I have is forming answers in my head along with questions because sometimes, it's difficult to picture certain things and then I forget easily. I may be add or adhd, I'm not sure.

    That is why I can't write stories, I get too add and go off somewhere else and get way too distracted. :/
    I hated school. I hated science class because all of the teachers I knew were jerks and treated me like crap
    for wanting to do things at my own pace.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Meek's Avatar
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    I was starting to wonder where I fall into this category and started getting a little sad. Then, I saw the last square and laughed so hard and it made me feel better. : )

    It really came as a huge surprise haha

  7. #7
    Senior Member Meek's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamske View Post
    EQUATIONS?!? Please don't. Science isn't about equations, just like literature isn't about spelling. You need to have some mathematical insight, but that can be learnt, just as spelling can be learnt.

    I've met lots of people who tell me "whoa, you're scientist? I've never understood that." And further in the conversation they ask me how soap works, and I tell them, and they wonder why they never liked science in school. "That's easy, if the teacher at school explained it like that...!"
    There are two problems with "science at school". One is the way it's taught and especially, how it's tested. The teacher can explain everything, but if the tests are all about the equations, the students will study the equations and remember science as being all about equations. The other is that, in this occasion, the "student" asked a specific question he's interested in, it's always more fun to get an answer on something you already wondered than to be flooded with knowledge you never asked for.

    The second isn't a problem at all for you. After all, you want to be a scientist.
    The first... well, you'll need the math, of course. But the math will become easy and even fun as soon as the scientific insight is there. I promise.

    Let me try a few science questions. You don't need to get them "right" at first sight, just see if they tickle you.

    (1) You've got two balls, equal diameter, one made of wood and the other of iron. Both are painted with the same paint. You let them fall. Which one will land first?

    (2) You glue the balls of question (1) together. How fast will the combined ball fall, compared to the separate ones?

    (3) You've got two identical light bulbs. Firstly, you connect one of them to a battery. Then you add the second in series. Will the first lamp burn brighter, less bright, or equally bright after you added the second bulb?

    If science interests you, please don't hesitate. Try. Don't let the maths scare you. If you can grasp concepts like force and velocity, the mathematical concept of vectors will suddenly be easy. Heck, even the relativity equations are... just equations. You can look them up if you need them. Relativity isn't about E = mc^2, to take the best known (and easiest) equation of relativity, but about inertia (the property of resisting against change) and energy (the property of being able to cause change) being one and the same. See the difference?

    Never mind type. I can't name a well-known INFP scientist (though I suspect some of my former colleagues), but why would that stop you? If there aren't INFP scientists yet, there should be!

    Last but not least: if you started to do experiments in order to answer my questions, you don't have to become a scientist. Then you are one already.
    What do you think of this? http://wuphys.wustl.edu/~katz/scientist.html

  8. #8
    Senior Member Scott N Denver's Avatar
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    I have a MS in physics and recently had my 5 year working anniversary.

    "Science" is pretty broad, do you have a more particular idea of what kind of science you would like to do?

    Any science research I've ever heard of will require a 4 year university degree, and often additional years and degree(s) beyond that as well. That's a significant amount of time to invest.

    Realize that there isn't exactly a particularly broad group of MBTI types that get drawn to science, and of those who start down that road only a subset will stick through with it. I TA'ed for years, not everyone that goes in thinking its what they want still feels that way after they see what it takes to get there and what it takes to stay there.

    The experience of others may differ perhaps, but in my experience there is not a very wide group of MBTI types who stick with science. If you don't like the types who do populate the field, or you don't function very effectively in their culture/workplace, those can be very big issues. In my experience, INT's form the majority of researchers, and usually NTJ's are the ones in the management positions.

    When you say "science" are you thinking specifically of being a "researcher" of some sort or other, or would you include "technology" and applying science/technology as well? Engineers learn a decent amount of science, thought they are much more on the applied side of things.

  9. #9
    Writing... Tamske's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meek View Post
    This is also true. But then again, what do you mean by "becoming a scientist"?
    I've studied physics until I was 22, then did a PhD for four years. Trying to work out other people's ideas, indeed - though I DID sometimes, almost secretly, try out a few things myself. They never worked out. But then again, that is research - if you don't try, you don't know it doesn't work. Only the working theories will get known. I did one year of postdoc afterwards. This is the only year I consider "lost", with hindsight - I worked long and hard to obtain zero new insights. Frustrating, yes. But it could also have worked...
    After that I became a teacher.
    So instead of at 22, I got my teacher's diploma at 28 years old. I could have done that earlier. True. But I don't consider those PhD years as lost. I did lots of science, I was really immersed and interested in it, I earned money and I was happy.

    My greatest dream is becoming a professional writer. If I ever become one, would those previous careers - a physics researcher, a teacher - be lost? Of course not. Only if you see the last thing as something ultimate, as something you should have geared to from the beginning, yes.
    I'm not resentful of the strange path I've taken to becoming a high school teacher. And if I become a writer, I'll have lots of science and teaching experience to mine inspiration from.

    So again, what is "becoming a scientist" to you? Do you want to be a researcher? A teacher? A learner? Do you just want to know how everything works because that's just cool? I'm a geek scientist too! :-)
    And not a researcher any more, because I was fed up with the way academics worked . And because I need deadlines to be productive. That doesn't take away any of my interest in science.
    Got questions? Ask an ENTP!
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  10. #10
    insert random title here Randomnity's Avatar
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    scientist = 4-5 years undergrad, then 4-7 years phd, depending how slow you are (and whether you need a masters first). If you do that, very very early in the undergrad part of it, try to work for at least a summer in a lab and see what it's like. The daily job is nothing like the undergrad (like any job, I guess). And it's a lot of school if you're not certain that you actually want the career.

    What kind of science do you spend your free time learning about? That'll give you a clue as to undergrad direction. What is your favourite science class in high school (you will need to take all three in many cases)

    <--grad student in science

    I'm not planning to be a prof, but that path has additional difficulties that you definitely should research if that's your plan.

    edit: while you will need varying amounts of math at the end job (anywhere from almost none to lots of addition/basic algebra to complex equations, depending on the field/specific job), you definitely need to pass several classes of it in undergrad, preferably with a decent mark. Math is just practicing for the most part, though.
    -end of thread-

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