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  1. #11
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    Sat in the back so I could slip out if it got deathly boring. Not an auditory learner although I can learn this way by forcing myself to focus on the droning. Did what was considered to be very well but not from being taught. More from reading and research.

    Part of my problem is disliking being directionally herded. My preference is to draw my own conclusions from materials including course materials and other non-approved perspectives.

  2. #12
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    I was a first row or first few rows sitter. Sitting in the back made me less engaged and more distracted by the people around me. Graduated with an A average.

    I've had some back-row sitters who've made As, but generally speaking, the farther back you sit, the less likely you are to make an A. Back row sitters just tend to be less engaged and less willing to pay attention, as well as more likely to text, chat with their neighbors or sneak computer time. That's been my experience as a teacher.
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  3. #13
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    ^ Agree with what back-row sitters are most likely to do (more likely to be less engaged), but that's precisely why I would sit in the back in pretty much all of my college lectures - the nature of the lectures was that the professors mostly just went through the lecture notes which were already printed out for everyone, so attending lecture wasn't really a value-add. There were of course exceptions, and it was imperative to attend some classes because a lot of extra stuff WAS gained in the lecture.

    It was such a case-by-case basis in college; I would always attend the first few weeks of every semester, and then decide whether there was a point in my continuing to attend the remaining lectures. And, of course, it depended too on how easy the subject matter was for me; for example, I attended all of the organic chem lectures, but I attended zero of the Stats 100 lectures (got a B in Organic Chem, because my brain didn't naturally and easily understand the material enough to ever be able to get into the A range on the exams, whereas I got an A+ in Stats 100 because it was... insanely easy). There were other classes where I'd attend one or two lectures a week and skip the third.

    Small class formats, though - attending a classroom in more of a discussion-mixed-with-lecture format - I always attended. I suppose I tended to sit halfway to the back on either the left or right side of the room. Never right in the center though.

    (I ended w/ a 3.6 gpa in undergrad. I blame it fully on the 1 semester freshman yr of 4 C's - due to my being in computer science, electrical engineering, and calc of several variables, all of which were very much NOT effortless for me. I also didn't really study like I should have.)

    In high school I was a 4.0 gpa, but back then the teachers would assign seats in all classes and switch that up a few times a year.

    Final comment - for me, at least, seating never impacted a whole lot. In the end I was/am always the sort to learn and study all on my own at home, without relying so much on the teacher, and if the coursework is really hard I'll attend classes for sure, but even then, it doesn't make a difference where I sit - if I know I need to be there to learn, then I'll pay attention. I'm not there to screw around. (If I were just going to screw around, I wouldn't be there in class)
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

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  4. #14
    Blah Orangey's Avatar
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    In my experience seating order has made a difference only in courses which require group discussion. When I taught public speaking or ran discussion sections as a TA for a large lecture course, the kids in the back were far less likely to voluntarily participate. As a result, I changed it so that the kids would arrange their desks in a circle (in the classrooms where I could...some could not be tampered with), and that seemed to make a huge difference in their willingness to discuss. It actually surprised me, as I would not have normally thought that the physical arrangement of the room could have so drastic an impact on the behavior or the students.
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  5. #15
    4x9 cascadeco's Avatar
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    ^ Interesting point, but makes sense.

    Although -I was always kind of resentful of forced participation. I vehemently dislike having to participate in class, and always disliked the teachers who would factor in participation as part of the grade. I mean I see the purpose in a few types of classes (i.e. foreign language classes, classes like philosophy, etc), but for most classes -- eh. I'm there to learn the material. I don't see why I have to be obligated to participate. From a teachers' perspective - I absolutely understand though why participation is desired; makes it less lecture-y, for one.
    "...On and on and on and on he strode, far out over the sands, singing wildly to the sea, crying to greet the advent of the life that had cried to him." - James Joyce

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  6. #16
    nee andante bechimo's Avatar
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    It sounds like people had small class sizes instead of lecture halls like some of us did.

  7. #17
    Glycerine
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    Yes, for me anyways, I space out too much in the back. The front helps me get A's.

  8. #18
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    In the front, you see better, you hear better, and because of those two...you write better/faster. It was shown somewhere that being able to see, hear, and write improves your memory of what went on that day + getting better grades. Sometimes people wonder why I get good grades even though I don't study as hard as them, it is because my mind has studied quite a bit already by the end of the day. But seeing the link that you gave, I feel sorry for those desperate people trying to get a good grade... even though they were smack dab in the front of the class. Maybe they thought they could magically get a good grade by just being in the front (like the blog... maybe they did lol.)

    I usually try to get a seat somewhere in the first couple of rows. The closer to the center/where the professor lectured or wrote(on the board/screen), the better. Nevermind the center if the professor uses a projector that is not at the center of the classroom or if the desk in front of the class is blocking the way. Best place for me? Where I can see the professor, where I can hear the professor (without other people talking,) and where I can follow and copy the lecture notes at a fast pace (instead of trying to see what is being written on the board.)

    I've only have 2 lecture halls so far, but no matter the class size, I just rather sit somewhere in the front. That is, unless the class is painstakingly... easy.

  9. #19
    not to be trusted miss fortune's Avatar
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    Most of the classes that I took had a door in the front side of the classroom... I always sat as close to the door as possible because I tended to arrive a bit late. I graduated with an A average
    “Oh, we're always alright. You remember that. We happen to other people.” -Terry Pratchett

  10. #20
    Senior Member IndyGhost's Avatar
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    really depended on the class size and the teacher, i suppose.

    suppose i have a teacher that likes to randomly call out students for answers. i'd sit farther back.

    suppose the class is packed full. i'd sit farther pack and preferably to the side.

    if it's a smaller classroom with less students. most likely more towards the front, but still closer to the side.

    i'm a shy kid, so anything near a wall is preferred, be it front, side, back.

    my grades ranged a lot. :/ i'd say i'm an average student overall. i get a lot of classroom anxiety.
    "I don't know a perfect person.
    I only know flawed people who are still worth loving."
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