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  1. #1
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    Default Critique of Community College

    Having just completed community college I feel as though I have not really completed college per se. It feels as though I completed an extended high school, and there are certain elements of community college that still bother me. Now that isn't to say I totally hate community college, on the contrary there are several factors that I like about it and whatnot. I just feel as though that certain parts of it need to be addressed for critique and review. Here I will present my own personal dislikes of community college:

    -It's major program is ridiculous; I majored in philosophy; I took a grand total of five actual philosophy courses (24 classes total).
    -It was required of me to take math, science, writing, and other classes. Why though so many? I'm majoring in philosophy there was no reason I needed to take courses in biology, geology, etc.
    -The courses are far too short and all of them are treated like intro level courses.
    -Most textbooks are often those expensive 500 pg. intro level texts, that are written in the most simplistic manner possible yet somehow take hourse to read through. (except for the philosophy books, they were dirt cheap and took minutes to read).

    I would appreciate any feedback on my critique as well as any other complaints of community college in general. I may possibly add more critiques later.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Brain View Post
    I'm majoring in philosophy there was no reason I needed to take courses in biology, geology, etc.
    It's called Natural Philosophy.

  3. #3
    Emerging Tallulah's Avatar
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    I teach at a community college, but I teach freshman-level classes, so I can't speak to the rest of it. I personally feel that at my school, we coddle the students too much--teachers are expected by administration to meet the students more than halfway. I feel like they're kind of wanting us to be high school teachers, and we, the teachers, would much rather treat them like adults. Coddling students fosters a sense of entitlement and irresponsibility, from my experience. It's frustrating.
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    The "real" Universities are almost as bad. They cost more too.
    The MBTI types me as an INFP, however, SOCIONICS calls me an Logical Intuitive Extram (called an ENTj in our terms.)

  5. #5
    RETIRED CzeCze's Avatar
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    I got a BA from a liberal arts college (supposedly has some of the highest hours of studying in the country) and also studying for a year at a community college after some years of working. I would say there are pros and cons of community college. The pros are that it can be much cheaper than a traditional college and can offer great pre/professional training. The cons are that the standards for traditional education (english, biology, etc.) are generally not as high or stringent.

    Community college is really a mixed bag, I think you really get out of it what you put in and its best use is for working adults going into second or third careers (pre/professional training), people taking classes for recreation, and for trad college aged students who lack the funds or are otherwise not ready for traditional college. An AA is the highest degree you can get at a community college, the ultimate academic goal is to do well enough and 'prove yourself' to go to a 4 year institution. It's a training ground. The experience at a commuter school is completely different from a trad college with I went to a huge community college and was surrounded by all sorts of students, different ages, different maturity levels, different levels of focus and studiousness.

    Your criticism about having to take a lot of classes - that's the same at most universities. The idea is to make you a well-rounded person. Or at least a person who is not illiterate or academically handicapped. If you hated taking those classes, it might be a blessing that you completed those requirements at community college where it is cheaper and usually faster and less painless than at a traditional college.

    Since I haven't taken a whole lot of 'traditional' undergrad courses at community college, I would say that most of my teachers held students to professional standards, even though there were lots of young/immature students and even students who were frankly odd (or more likely had psychiatric/emotional disorders).

    I actually really enjoyed my community college experience, it was flip opposite in many ways from my traditional college experience. A lot of it had to do with my own perspective though.

    I think with a field like philosophy, I could see how you might find your experience unfulfilling. I think the best bets for community college are classes that are straightforward and it's more about the information itself than how it's taught...if that makes sense. Like taking accounting.

    Okay, I'm rambling, I might ramble some more later.
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  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Peguy
    It's called Natural Philosophy.
    Even so, at 24 classes max one, mabye two classes for sceince should have been it. Besides I've already learned the elementary basics of bio, geo, and whatnot; I don't really need another whole class on it.

    Originally posted by Tallulah
    I teach at a community college, but I teach freshman-level classes, so I can't speak to the rest of it. I personally feel that at my school, we coddle the students too much--teachers are expected by administration to meet the students more than halfway. I feel like they're kind of wanting us to be high school teachers, and we, the teachers, would much rather treat them like adults. Coddling students fosters a sense of entitlement and irresponsibility, from my experience. It's frustrating.
    I know what you mean; I mean as a student I was fairly independent, but observing some of my other peers it seemed as though they still were kids in a certain respect, and at times it seemed as though the teacher treated them that way as well. Hell sometimes it doesn't surprise me that school admins would expect teachers to treat students that way; there were time in my philosophy courses where the instructor would initiate some socratic thinking, waiting eagerly for students to respond back. Most of the time it was dead silence from a full class of thirty students, almost no one would ever respond back and I would think to myself 'why did these people all take philosophy course anyway? If they don't understand the material then why do they take these classes?'.

    Originally posted by Nameless Hero
    The "real" Universities are almost as bad. They cost more too.
    Oh you've gotta be kidding me. Well, looks like I have another reason not to go to four year college.

    Originally posted by Cze Cze
    I got a BA from a liberal arts college (supposedly has some of the highest hours of studying in the country) and also studying for a year at a community college after some years of working. I would say there are pros and cons of community college. The pros are that it can be much cheaper than a traditional college and can offer great pre/professional training. The cons are that the standards for traditional education (english, biology, etc.) are generally not as high or stringent.

    Community college is really a mixed bag, I think you really get out of it what you put in and its best use is for working adults going into second or third careers (pre/professional training), people taking classes for recreation, and for trad college aged students who lack the funds or are otherwise not ready for traditional college. An AA is the highest degree you can get at a community college, the ultimate academic goal is to do well enough and 'prove yourself' to go to a 4 year institution. It's a training ground. The experience at a commuter school is completely different from a trad college with I went to a huge community college and was surrounded by all sorts of students, different ages, different maturity levels, different levels of focus and studiousness.
    Oh yeah, the pros are definitely something important that I have considered, I mean community college has been easier in terms of money and the idea of jumpin straight into a four year college was not something that I was intially ever prepared for.

    Your criticism about having to take a lot of classes - that's the same at most universities. The idea is to make you a well-rounded person. Or at least a person who is not illiterate or academically handicapped. If you hated taking those classes, it might be a blessing that you completed those requirements at community college where it is cheaper and usually faster and less painless than at a traditional college.

    I think with a field like philosophy, I could see how you might find your experience unfulfilling. I think the best bets for community college are classes that are straightforward and it's more about the information itself than how it's taught...if that makes sense. Like taking accounting.
    Still though, a couple more philosophy courses in thier philosophy department would have been nicer. Although now that you mention it, getting the other basic courses out of the way first will probably be more helpful for 4 year college (granted that I do go there).

  7. #7
    Freaking Ratchet Rail Tracer's Avatar
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    Yes, I felt like community college was a continuation of high school. I did more in this one semester of my current college than I ever did in high school and community college combined.

    I believe what you are annoyed about are those general education courses . You have to take general education, even at a regular college, at least around these parts. It's probably to get you to continually think in a different way. It's like that whole expression of language "Use it or lose it" and all those other things they "teach" you like critical thinking.

    Most of your lower division courses could be considered intro courses. It is pretty much getting you ready for what is suppose to be the upper division courses.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Savage Brain View Post
    Even so, at 24 classes max one, mabye two classes for sceince should have been it. Besides I've already learned the elementary basics of bio, geo, and whatnot; I don't really need another whole class on it.
    I'm not necessarily disagreeing with you. You also have to take into consideration the predominance of thinking supposedly derived from the natural sciences on much of contemporary philosophy as well. This is the basis of the Analytic tradition for example, which predominates within Anglosphere countries. Then also there's the sad trend towards cutting many humanities courses from college as a whole.

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    There's also the lingering influence of Postivist thinking within academic and everyday discouse as well. Especially Logical Positivism(we this for example with the New Atheists), even though it's fallen out of favor in philosophical circles for quite some time.

  10. #10
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    I think Chris Rock called Community College a nightclub with books.
    "Here's ten dollars; let me get my learn on!"

    Seriously,
    Quote Originally Posted by CzeCze View Post
    I think you really get out of it what you put in
    This is absolutely true, and it goes for all learning institutions. Trust me.
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